#1
I want to learn how to fingerpick well..to add some diversity to playing. Played guitar so using a pick feels normal but are there any suggestions or a technique for 2 finger(index and middle) fingerpicking?

Bought my first bass a week ago. It wasn't hard at all switching over from guitar because the neck is specially made to cater to guitar players(I know I'm gonna be insulted for comparing a guitar to a bass and how I don't have a true bass and wont get the real experience
#3
I'm playing guitar and bass sometimes but the best tip is to try slower and try to increase the speed when you feel confortable. Try to push your limits. That's what I've got to say for this.
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#4
Quote by JKHC
the neck is specially made to cater to guitar players(I know I'm gonna be insulted for comparing a guitar to a bass and how I don't have a true bass and wont get the real experience

I assume you mean you're playing a short scale? There's nothing wrong with that at all.

Practice using a metronome, and really work on keeping your fingers moving consistently and evenly. Start off slow and build up speed (slowly), your main focus should be on accuracy and consistency, speed will come as a by-product later.
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#5
Quote by Tostitos
I assume you mean you're playing a short scale?



Not a short scale.
#6
Quote by JKHC
Not a short scale.


Then how else could it be "specially made?"
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#7
the profile might be specifically catered to feel like a strat neck or something, who knows?

the one thing you have to remember is that no matter how good you are at guitar you are starting from scratch. its gonna be frustrating and annoying to get finger picking down, don't let that discourage you, finger picking is amazing.
no sir away a papaya war is on
#8
Quote by the_perdestrian
the profile might be specifically catered to feel like a strat neck or something, who knows?


I.... think i understand.

Anywho, if you want to build up your fingerpicking strength, I found an exercise (i think it was on this site actually)

Play this: down to the G string, then back up (do it across all twelve frets)

E[-1111-2222-3333-4444-]
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
Last edited by vampirelazarus at Apr 18, 2011,
#9
Quote by vampirelazarus
I.... think i understand.

Anywho, if you want to build up your fingerpicking strength, I found an exercise (i think it was on this site actually)

Play this: down to the G string, then back up (do it across all twelve frets)

E[-1111-2222-3333-4444-]


This is good but try variations as well such as:

G------------------------------
D------------------------------
A------------------------------
E-1111-3333-2222-4444-

Or:

G-------------------------
D-------------------------
A-------------------------
E-1111-2-2-3333-4-4-

(Again across all strings) - Good luck!
#10
Quote by JKHC
I don't have a true bass and wont get the real experience


What the hell is a true bass!? I bet this guy can groove harder on a $30 washtub bass than I can on a $2000 Fender American Deluxe P Bass.

As far as technique find one that feels good. Some people like to use a floating technique. Others like to anchor to the pickup, pickguard, edge of the neck, pull bar, pretty much anything they can find. Eventually you'll want to be able to use any technique. But for now just find something that feels right. The best advise I have ever heard "If you don't feel it, dont play it!"
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Well played, sir, well played.
Last edited by TheMooseKnuckle at Apr 18, 2011,
#11
Try to make it a habit to alternate between the two fingers all the time. Sometimes when I practice a certain riff I can't play fast enough I tend to use the same finger for consecutive notes on the same string, but I hammered it into me to alternate my fingers and the results made it sound smoother and easier for me to play.
#12
Quote by TheMooseKnuckle
What the hell is a true bass!? I bet this guy can groove harder on a $30 washtub bass than I can on a $2000 Fender American Deluxe P Bass.

As far as technique find one that feels good. Some people like to use a floating technique. Others like to anchor to the pickup, pickguard, edge of the neck, pull bar, pretty much anything they can find. Eventually you'll want to be able to use any technique. But for now just find something that feels right. The best advise I have ever heard "If you don't feel it, dont play it!"



People on other sites have told me that you only get a "'true bass experience"(don't know what that is either) unless you fingerpick(I despise it) .

I prefer anchoring to the pickup and it's surprisingly easy to fingerpick now(still hate it) although I doubt enough practice will allow me to play faster than I would with a pick.
#13
Quote by JKHC
People on other sites have told me that you only get a "'true bass experience"(don't know what that is either) unless you fingerpick(I despise it) .

I prefer anchoring to the pickup and it's surprisingly easy to fingerpick now(still hate it) although I doubt enough practice will allow me to play faster than I would with a pick.


traditionalists. they are stupid. the ony way to get a true bass experience is to employ as many styles and genres as you can.
no sir away a papaya war is on
#14
To sum up what's been said:

Fingerpicking is not the only true way to go. Many bassists prefer it (myself included). But Perdestrian is onto something, in that learning many different styles is always a good thing (though I'd disagree that even that is the ONLY way to get a true bass experience).

Digressing, getting consistent with alternating your two fingers is key. Not only is it easy to accidentally start 'swinging', but without practice you'll find that your two fingers will give you two very different tones. Being able to play fast without either of these two things happening is a big step in your bass skill.

Also practice playing on different strings. I use a classic method: playing scales and arpeggios, and variations on these. You will find a whole new world opened up to you once playing between strings becomes second nature.

Hope I helped.
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