#1
I finished all three of Alfred's Essentials for music theory books and now I am looking for something more advanced.
Any suggestions?
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#2
I know these are dvd's but lick library have some advanced theory dvd's that helped me a lot. Just go to their site and look for them. There should be 3 levels, Basic, Intermediate and Advanced.
#4
The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine is awesome, just putting it out there. Sorry, I don't actually know what level of books Alfred's essentials are
#5
the jazz theory book is really good, if you want to get real advanced theres a book called Contemporary Harmony, by (spelling of this name will probably be wrong) ludmila uhela. if you want to go beyong the alfreds, but stay relatively safe, theres a book called tonal harmony by stefan kostka, and a series of harmony books by robert ottman.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Apr 17, 2011,
#6
Quote by Unrelaxed
The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine is awesome, just putting it out there. Sorry, I don't actually know what level of books Alfred's essentials are


Alfred's covered a lot of stuff.
Scales modes chord creation (major/minor/aug/dim) chord accompaniment melody creation, binary, ternary, and rondo form
On top of all the basics
Staff, intervals,etc....
Quote by kaptkegan
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#8
I checked out some of the ones you guys said but they were either too expensive or the majority of the book I already covered
I found this book
http://www.amazon.com/Music-Theory-Handbook-Marjorie-Merryman/dp/0155026623/ref=sr_1_5?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1303068403&sr=1-5#_
what do you guys think?
The only thing I know in that book is Part 1 pretty much.
Quote by kaptkegan
Don't think I've ever been sigged.


I pretty much never leave the drug thread anymore.
#10
I'd be warry of a book that only covers the common practice period, if you already have the basics of theory down. if you have never analyzed a piece, maybe buy it and use it as a companion to get the hang of doing that sort of thing?
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#11
Tonal Harmony - Kostka, Payne

This is what most universities use for first two years of music theory. I've used it and it has helped me immensely as a music composition major.

It will be expensive with the CD, work-book and the Answer manual. But you won't be disappointed once you proceed with it. And it will keep you busy for some time.

BTW, I want to give my opinion about choosing theory books. Don't buy a theory book based on Jazz or popular music. Study a book of classical music that introduces four-part writing (like the book I suggested). Then it will be a matter of minutes when you want to understand a concept from another style of music.

Good luck!
#12
Quote by Metallicuh
I checked out some of the ones you guys said but they were either too expensive or the majority of the book I already covered
I found this book
http://www.amazon.com/Music-Theory-Handbook-Marjorie-Merryman/dp/0155026623/ref=sr_1_5?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1303068403&sr=1-5#_
what do you guys think?
The only thing I know in that book is Part 1 pretty much.



I do not know it -- I would be concerned about diving into counterpoint on guitar as a way of learning theory. Piano, surely. but on guitar it takes very good dexterity and reading chops. Might be very rewarding -- but, to me, that is a little more advanced on guitar as a playing technique.
#13
I do not know it -- I would be concerned about diving into counterpoint on guitar as a way of learning theory. Piano, surely. but on guitar it takes very good dexterity and reading chops. Might be very rewarding -- but, to me, that is a little more advanced on guitar as a playing technique.


you don't always play everything you learn in theory on your instrument. if you study arranging for a 18 piece band, your not going to be playing it on guitar--likewise if you write a piece with four voice counterpoint between 2 violins a viola and a cello, your not going to play it on guitar.
I would be wary of studying part writing and counterpoint before you understand functional harmony, taken to the absolute limits of chromatisism (late romantic stuff). as a composer of classical music, part writing and counterpoint form a neccesary foundation, but as an instrumentalist (particularly if you want to improvise), you will get better, faster if you understand the way harmony works before working on period-specific techniques (and I'd say once you get the basics of harmony down, you should work on part writing then tonal counterpoint then serialism then, if you absolutely feel you have to species counterpoint).
BTW, I want to give my opinion about choosing theory books. Don't buy a theory book based on Jazz or popular music. Study a book of classical music that introduces four-part writing (like the book I suggested). Then it will be a matter of minutes when you want to understand a concept from another style of music.

I think thats great advice if you want to play and write classical music. But, if you want to play and write jazz or popular music, it makes more sense to start by studying that, and then get into classical music. one HUGE problem with most classical texts (ESPECIALLY if you want to write popular music. though the kosta text is pretty solid) is that they portray theory as something that you have to learn in chronological order--which makes little sense, as the most applicable stuff occurs in the middle (romantism-impressionism), and is not substaintially more difficult then the stuff you start with (if you understand harmony, and how to read music). moreover, while an understanding of classical theory is great (and analyzing scores of classical music is one of the best things you can do---though if you understand threory from a more jazz oriented background, you can still do that), a lot of it (especially the stuff you do when your starting out) is heavily based on rules, which teach what to do, but not how to do it, and teach you to write for musical forms that are pretty antiquated--moreover if you really understand theory from a jazz or pop standpoint, it won't take you to long to understand the way its applied to classical music, though you may not be able to write period accurate baroque chorales (which really isn't that big of a loss, unless thats what you want to learn to do--in which case you should spend a lot of time on it, but if it's not, you shouldn't feel that you have to before you start working with more applicable harmonic concepts).
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Apr 17, 2011,
#14
Ok TS now that you have the basics down can you pick the key of a song?

If not, re-read those books very slowly, and apply what is taught to the guitar and songs. If you know all you claim to know, you should be aware of where you need work.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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