#1
my gibson sg faded headstock snapped clean off this morning when i was leaving band practice, it was in a gigbag and i bumped it on the doorframe accidentaly of course, and a few hours after i got home i took it out to play and the headstock falls down. so i took off the strings bridge and tailpiece, and told my parents. they flipped shit. i try and explain to them its a very common break on these type of guitars (gibsons) and try to explain how its because of the angle of the headstock and the thickness of the wood, they continue to insist how its all my fault and i have no respect or care for my things when its a 3 year old guitar i bought brand new with my money and other than a tad bit of fading in the finish and some rust on the screws its in perfect shape. how can i explain to them that its not all my fault and that i wasnt just bashing my equipment around and how easy of a fix it is? ill try and uplaod a picture
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Last edited by jesus=dinosaur at Apr 16, 2011,
#10
if the headstock broke clean off (probably along a joint), its a pretty simple, albeit expensive, fix. its a pretty common issue on gibson type guitars (I personally have an epi that has lost its head... stupid singer wrapping cable around my feet) and most good shops know how to deal with it. the shop that fixed my epi charged $60 ($100 if you want the finish in the area to be re-done to hide the repair).

However, if the break isn't clean (splintered) or anything is in multiple pieces or the neck is structurally damaged, you're outta luck. its near impossible, not to mention totally impractical, to swap a neck on a set-neck guitar

maybe a hardcase is in your future
#11
It looks pretty clean. Take it to a good tech and they can save it. Plus the joint will be stronger after it has been repaired. Once it is buy a hardcase! Also set neck guitars can have their necks replaced. It is just very expensive. You have to break the glue joint with heat and then move from there.
Last edited by Tyler.Allain at Apr 16, 2011,
#12
Also when you take it to your tech tell him to explain to them how frequent these things happen and how easily they can happen. But how does it matter if you bought the thing and are paying to have it fixed. Do you need them to pay for it to be repaired?
#13
i know to take it to a luthier, im doing that tomorrow morning, i was actually supposed to get a hardcase for my birthday but my parents decided i needed a new phone instead. luckily its a clean break, i hope i get fixed as cheap as you did. i havent asked them to pay for it, i figure since they were pissed at me id pay for it, which is going to take a chunk out my new amp fund. i tried explaining to my parents about how common these breaks are but they refused to listen to me
Last edited by jesus=dinosaur at Apr 16, 2011,
#14
Get a clamp and some good wood glue. Titebond wood glue is great. You can save it-- believe it or not that is a common break on Gibson guitars. Search the net you'll find ways to fix it.
#15
Quote by Goat Head Stew
Get a clamp and some good wood glue. Titebond wood glue is great. You can save it-- believe it or not that is a common break on Gibson guitars. Search the net you'll find ways to fix it.


Do NOT DO IT YOURSELF. Let a professional do it. I mean if it were a cheap guitar and you had multiple then you go have a go at it. I do most of the work on my guitars but even with my experience I wouldn't do a job like this. That is just my opinion though.
#16
yeah man, thats a pretty easy fix there. you shouldn't have any problem getting it fixed.

if you are worried about your folks reaction (I know the feeling, I mangled 6-8 snowboards a year when I was a kid), try showing them how clean the break is and explaining that it is a problem with the design. Yes, you dropped it, theres no two ways around that. But, the fact that its broken is as much a result of you dropping it as it is the result of the design
#17
im not planning on doinf it myself id be to scared id screw it up even though i have quite a good bit of woodworking experience iv never worked on guitars, i didnt drop it, i hit it on a doorframe accidentaly and i know they are already pissed at me
#18
i repaired an ibanez semi hollow with the same problem. I basically used guerilla glue on it and clamped the peices together very tightly. it was splintered a little but i filled it in with a stainable wood filler. After i restained it the only really noticable difference was a loss of sustain. i even ended up trading it for a nice ltd viper with a case.
#19
Quote by Tyler.Allain
Do NOT DO IT YOURSELF. Let a professional do it. I mean if it were a cheap guitar and you had multiple then you go have a go at it. I do most of the work on my guitars but even with my experience I wouldn't do a job like this. That is just my opinion though.



I've fixed a similar break myself before. It's a clean break. It's not Rocket science, you glue part A to part B. It is a common Gibson break, and there is tons of info on the net on how to fix it. What seems to be the problem?
#20
Quote by Goat Head Stew
I've fixed a similar break myself before. It's a clean break. It's not Rocket science, you glue part A to part B. It is a common Gibson break, and there is tons of info on the net on how to fix it. What seems to be the problem?


It could become a mess if you haven't done it before. You place the headstock back together wrong initially and when you pull it away hastily you splinter another piece. There are things that could go wrong. Nothing is full proof. It is his only guitar and I'm sure he would feel more comfortable and the result would be much better if he had somebody who had done such work before take care of it. A lot of times when people have this thing happen they will try to piece the headstock together to try and figure out in a panic if it would look okay repaired and end up causing further damage.
#23
You did hit the door frame with the guitar you admitted that. Suck it up have it repaired and move on. As an added bonus you learn a lesson. Gigbags are crap buy a hardshell case.
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#24
Quote by jesus=dinosaur
my gibson sg faded headstock snapped clean off this morning when i was leaving band practice, it was in a gigbag and i bumped it on the doorframe accidentaly of course, and a few hours after i got home i took it out to play and the headstock falls down. so i took off the strings bridge and tailpiece, and told my parents. they flipped shit. i try and explain to them its a very common break on these type of guitars (gibsons) and try to explain how its because of the angle of the headstock and the thickness of the wood, they continue to insist how its all my fault and i have no respect or care for my things when its a 3 year old guitar i bought brand new with my money and other than a tad bit of fading in the finish and some rust on the screws its in perfect shape. how can i explain to them that its not all my fault and that i wasnt just bashing my equipment around and how easy of a fix it is? ill try and uplaod a picture

Dude that sucks all manner of ass. There's nothing you can do man.

I guess wait till you have enough money and buy a cheep epi SG and sawp ur pickups in it. Or save and buy a used one online.

In the future get a hard case
Quote by Twist of fate
Why must the fat die young
#25
Not a guitar expert but i'm sure off the shelf glue wont work. Your gonna need a much stronger adhesive like say epoxy. Thats what id try. Otherwise, i'd try to replace the entire neck.

The wood glue available in stores is bullshit. They are made to bond parts what will remain static and wont have alot of loads on it. A guitar isnt like that at all. You'll have the string loads and also vibration loading due to the strings. As soon as you start tuning that guitar and the string loads get on it its gonna put alot of stress on the bond it self an cause it to snap.

I just did a rough calculation using the data for Daddario stings and the neck can experience more than 100lbs of tension when the strings are tuned and just sitting there. Id design it to take 400lbs just to be safe.

Epoxy is much stronger and should do the trick, they have some that are designed specifically to bond wood together. That crap wont break under any load. Some epoxies are so strong that Lotus uses it to hold the chassis of a Lotus elise together rather than welding it.

You can also add some fibreglass or a bit of carbon fibre to the back of the neck, to increase the strength. If you sand down the finished neck and re paint it it can actually look pretty nice too.

I say take it to a skilled guitar shop see what they say. If they cant do it, then try somewhere that does fibre glassing and have experience working with epoxy.
Quote by Twist of fate
Why must the fat die young
Last edited by reggaebassman at Apr 17, 2011,
#26
Epoxy?? Come on people read some about guitar repair. Super glue your fingers together and try a google search. Epoxy??? Jeeez.
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#27
You can have set necks replaced, I've seen it done and also take a look at Marc Bolans Les Paul Custom neck on a Les Paul Standard body.

In this case go to a luthier and get it repaired, it shouldn't be too hard and the chances are if it's a good repair it'll be stronger afterwards.
#28
Quote by 3lusiv3
http://www.edroman.com/rants/les_paul_necks.htm
Show your parents this. It's possibly the smartest thing Ed Roman has ever written.

EDIT: That said, as good as that is article is, his personal bias shines through so much.



He might be biased, but unfortunately a lot of it is true. I had a Gibson headstock break on me once. I fixed it myself no problem. I read a story about how Gary Rossington broke his Les Paul and fixed it with carpenters glue and two screws. So I decided to try it myself and it worked with no problems.

I love Gibson but this is the reason why I stopped buying them. If I want a single cut guitar I go for ESP or Ibanez single cuts, they are built like tanks.

I even beat the living crap out of my custom strat and that thing will not break no matter how hard I bash it.
#29
It can be fixed just don't try your self get a luthier to do it so it will be done right. I've had worse breaks and had them repaired to working order.
Live and Learn no mater how cheep a guitar is a hard case is worth the price(as you now know)
Best of luck to you