#1
Me and a friend are lookin into starting a band, and because I am so new, when this plan comes to fruition i will be rhythm guitar. He says scales arent that important for my role, however I'd like to know some opinions on that, as well as what a rhythm guitarist should know.
#2
Just learn as much as possible. Rhythm guitar isn't a different type of guitaring or technique, it's a role and what is best for you is to just keep practicing and learning as much as possible.

P.S if you wanna write anything, scales are pretty useful
#3
Atleast some basic knowledge of the notes present in a scale is essential for any guitarist.For eg: The notes present in C major are C D E F G A B C, and so on.This is useful in creating new songs or rhythms, which, I think is primarily your job.
Secondly, power chords are needed.Also,learn how to palm mute correctly.Other than that, a few solos from your side wont hurt either.
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#4
You should never limit yourself in knowledge, practice or skills. Learn as much as you can about guitar in general and develop a pool of skills you can utilise in any situation or role.
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#5
your friend is trolling you...
EDIT:
if you don't know scales, how the hell are you supposed to play anything other than major and minor chords?
Last edited by dhruvrajvanshi at Apr 17, 2011,
#6
+1

your friend talks out of his arse and probably doesn't know anywhere near as much as he would like you to think.

Playing the guitar is playing the guitar, music is music.
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#8
Ok knowing scales is vital, except if you aren't gonna write anything, for rhythm guitar you need to get the strum down, the lead guitar has the cool stuff on the fretboard, you're allowed to have fun with the strum. Go back to acoustic for a little bit and you'll be set, if you can hold a 4/4, you're pretty much good, rhythm guitar is not too hard especially in modern rock, try to write as much as possible coz it's really easy to replace a rhythm guitarist who doesn't do anything.
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#9
>friend says "scales aren't important for rhythm"

Bollocks. Utter bollocks. Rhythm guitarists need to know scales just as much as lead guitarists because they

A; need to understand where/what notes are the I ii iii iv v vi and vi of a scale, and how it differs from major and minor (and other scales) in order to write, and just generally understand what's going on.
B: As well as this, you may want fill licks to be done between chords and the like by the rhythm.
C: by him saying that he is damaging your progression as a musician because it will put you off learning vital things because he "thinks its not important"

now go learn those scales like a boss.
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Last edited by Banjocal at Apr 17, 2011,
#10
You need scales to make rhythm riffs with. For example, if you look at Number Of The Beast, the rhythm track uses D Dorian and C Ionian. If the guys from maiden hadn't have known that, they would have made a shit riff instead of one that sounds great. Scales are very important for any type of rhythm guitar in all genre's of music. I think your friend just needs to get his head out of his ass and actually give a damn about someone other than himself.

Ok, so I'd say that learning all of the scales and the modes within them is a good place to start. You could then start working on triads (especially for metal), chords and chord inversions. And throughout this process, you will need to practice tremolo picking, palm muting and hammer-on's and pull-off's in order to become a good, well rounded rhythm guitarist. All this will take about a year and after that, you can work on playing these scales fast and using techniques such as sweep picking and economy picking to be able to shred and maybe even do a guitar battle on stage. Thats the most fun about being a rhythm player, busting out a random shred to knock everyone on their asses.

Well, I hope I helped you. Good luck starting the band and writing music!
#11
Quote by Naruto00121
You need scales to make rhythm riffs with. For example, if you look at Number Of The Beast, the rhythm track uses D Dorian and C Ionian. If the guys from maiden hadn't have known that, they would have made a shit riff instead of one that sounds great. Scales are very important for any type of rhythm guitar in all genre's of music. I think your friend just needs to get his head out of his ass and actually give a damn about someone other than himself.

Ok, so I'd say that learning all of the scales and the modes within them is a good place to start. You could then start working on triads (especially for metal), chords and chord inversions. And throughout this process, you will need to practice tremolo picking, palm muting and hammer-on's and pull-off's in order to become a good, well rounded rhythm guitarist. All this will take about a year and after that, you can work on playing these scales fast and using techniques such as sweep picking and economy picking to be able to shred and maybe even do a guitar battle on stage. Thats the most fun about being a rhythm player, busting out a random shred to knock everyone on their asses.

Well, I hope I helped you. Good luck starting the band and writing music!

The sentiment is right, but sadly your example is wrong. There's no need to bring modes into this discussion at all, they're a long way from being relevant or useful to the threadstarter. Likewise Number of the Beast doesn't use any modes, however a good understanding of the major scale no doubt helped them withthe chord construction.
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#12
Quote by rednightmare
You should never limit yourself in knowledge, practice or skills. Learn as much as you can about guitar in general and develop a pool of skills you can utilise in any situation or role.

Very true!
As far as what you should now as a Rhythm player...TIMING!
Make sure that your timing, chord changes, sense of rhythm etc is as tight as you can be!!
The "rhythm" guitarist in my band may not know a lot of theory/scales etc but puts me to shame when it comes to his riffing! He's like a machine
So if you wanna be a great rhythm player (and get one over your friend) DEVELOP an amazing sense of timing and accuracy.
#13
Quote by Iblis92
Me and a friend are lookin into starting a band, and because I am so new, when this plan comes to fruition i will be rhythm guitar. He says scales arent that important for my role, however I'd like to know some opinions on that, as well as what a rhythm guitarist should know.

Your friend has no clue at all what he's talking about The rhythm guitarist and the bass player are the most important parts of the band.

The drummer sets the basic rhythm and keeps timing.
The bass player tells the chord progression and helps set the rhythm
The rhythm player has to listen to everyone else and glue the band together

These guys roles aren't as flashy but they are the most important

The singer and lead guitarists are the least important. If they mess up its not a big deal, all they have to do is do the same thing twice and people will think they meant to do it. If the other 3 mess up EVERYONE knows immediately and you throw everything off.

You will need to know your scales and chords, and also know how the chords sound. Also as rhythm, if someone is out of tune its up to you to change keys and keep everything working right.

Rhythm is a big role but it will make you into a really good all round musician, because you really have to listen to everyone to make your part work right.
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Last edited by reggaebassman at Apr 17, 2011,
#14
Learn to harmonize, it helps.

Also, tell your friend he's wrong.
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#16
Quote by Iblis92
Me and a friend are lookin into starting a band, and because I am so new, when this plan comes to fruition i will be rhythm guitar. He says scales arent that important for my role, however I'd like to know some opinions on that, as well as what a rhythm guitarist should know.


If you're serious about starting a band, consider covering Beast and the Harlot by Avenged Sevenfold (A7x). It's not to hard a song to play, and the only tricky part is the solo, which is lead's job anyway. If I remember right, its at a tempo of 180 and the rhythm guitarist is playing either open barre chords (instead of tuning EADGBE, tune down to DADGBE) from Open (0's) to 5th fret (5s). You really fluctuate between opens and 1st frets in 1 section, but other than that, its usually 1 barre chord played at 180 tempo, 8TH NOTES. And the above posts where correct. Use palm muting and alternate picking WHILE palm muting. It'll help create killer metal rhythm riffs.
#17
Quote by Iblis92
Me and a friend are lookin into starting a band, and because I am so new, when this plan comes to fruition i will be rhythm guitar. He says scales arent that important for my role, however I'd like to know some opinions on that, as well as what a rhythm guitarist should know.


Another simple one in Drop D? (DADGBE tuning). Walk by Pantera. One of the easiest drop D songs i've seen..

Thunderstruck-AC/DC

Down with the Sickness-Disturbed

Chasm- Flyleaf (this one would help lead guitarist get coordinated and possibly have to transpose if he wanted to and got lazy :p this song has a couple parts that can be transposed simply just for convenience)

Cassie- Flyleaf

Smells Like Teen Spirit- Nirvana (Old? A bit. But still a GOOD SONG! I play it in Drop D because I can hit the beginning power chords. Another song I transposed)

Those are some songs I would cover personally because they are not to difficult and require basic skills... I can play all of these (and I've only been playing a year. 9 months for metal)

So yeah. Hope I helped. Good luck staring the band!
#18
As everyone else said it will help, however I wouldn't rush to it yet. Make sure you know chords well enough before studying how they are formed.
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