#1
So I play with some girl friends in a cover band, I play bass and it's all kinda fun (though it can be frustrating being the only dude in a band, trust me). Anyways, I actually started playing bass so I could play with my best friend (who is a guitarist). My friend loves Thrash and NWOBHM mostly, but also likes some of the 90s Metal (RATM, SOAD, Tool, that kinda stuff). Thing is, last week I played a live gig with the girls and after we got offstage two friends of mine (one of whom plays drums and the other one plays guitar, and they both play together in a Math Rock band with a couple of other dudes) approached me and asked me to form a band together. I immediately called my best friend and asked if he could join too. They said it was fine.

We haven't actually set a day for our first jam/band reunion. But thing is everyone in the band has kinda different influences. Overall we all like each other's music, but have different "focus points" in our tastes. Like I said, my best friend prefers Thrash and NWOBHM, the drummer loves bands like Tool/Rage Against the Machine or Foals/Radiohead, the other guitarist also LOVES Foals, Radiohead, The Drums and is into some more indie-ish stuff (though he says his first favorite guitarist as a kid was Slash so he does have a hard rock-ish background) oh and his favorite genre is Math Rock. Myself? My favorite bands are Megadeth, Metallica, RATM, Tool, Led Zeppelin, Motörhead and Slayer. But I also love stuff like Strokes, Arctic Monkeys and Grunge.

My problem is, how do we "look" for our sound? How do we approach our first jamming with these different influences? Should we try to define what we "should" sound like first or just write stuff? Or maybe compromise some of our ideas for the band? How do we go from not having an album that sounds like a Radiohead/Megadeth compilation and actually sounds like an actual band?
Current Gear:
Peavey Zodiac DE Scorpio (Bass)
Yamaha RBX-170 (Bass)
Boss ODB-3 (Overdrive Pedal)
Line 6 LowDown 150 (Amp)
Last edited by Silveroon009 at Apr 17, 2011,
#2
Your problem is hypothetical - it does not exist. Just play together, it will either work or not.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
Coming from a band in which everyone has a huge difference in taste, I know how you feel.
It might be complicated at first, but at the same time it can lead to some very unique sounds.

I find that it works best to agree on learning one song each member has chosen. Something that everyone can play, but mostly reflects that persons taste. It gives everyone a feel of what the person likes, and a feel on how to play that style. Eventually you guys can just share riffs and ideas.

At least in my band, we each write full songs on our own and then let the other members add their flavor into the mix. Works pretty well.
#4
Quote by ikarian-pride
Coming from a band in which everyone has a huge difference in taste, I know how you feel.
It might be complicated at first, but at the same time it can lead to some very unique sounds.

I find that it works best to agree on learning one song each member has chosen. Something that everyone can play, but mostly reflects that persons taste. It gives everyone a feel of what the person likes, and a feel on how to play that style. Eventually you guys can just share riffs and ideas.

At least in my band, we each write full songs on our own and then let the other members add their flavor into the mix. Works pretty well.


I agree with you, but the second paragraph is relevant if you intend to be a cover band, and the third paragraph is relevant if you intend to be an originals band.

You should decide at the start whether you intend to be an originals or a covers band. They are different things, different goals, different venues and audiences.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
Quote by AlanHB
I agree with you, but the second paragraph is relevant if you intend to be a cover band, and the third paragraph is relevant if you intend to be an originals band.

You should decide at the start whether you intend to be an originals or a covers band. They are different things, different goals, different venues and audiences.


I think he meant just to have something to jam too, to get everyones heads moving to what kind of music everyone likes. We all know originals take time, it's easier to show up to the first couple practice and atleast have 2 or 3 songs to play and jam to than sitting there trying to put together a song. Which in my experience, doesn't work, songs are best developed outside of "jams and practices", the fine tuned in practice.


To the TS, having a lot of different influences is a good thing. It will hopefully help you develop a more original sound. Figure out what everybody's strengths and weaknesses are and then work to develop something around that.

Just decide on a few songs to learn before your first practice so you can get use to playing together. Your sound will develop in itself as soon as you all start playing more together. Focus on writing music, not worrying about what genre your going to fall under.
#6
My influences are Coheed and Cambria and Jukebox The Ghost. My drummers influences are A Day To Remember and The Devil Wears Prada. Our bassists influences are Tool and Pagan's Mind. Our singer's influences are Aretha Franklin and(the only match) Coheed and Cambria. We make it work. You can too.
#7
Quote by Dio10101
My influences are Coheed and Cambria and Jukebox The Ghost. My drummers influences are A Day To Remember and The Devil Wears Prada. Our bassists influences are Tool and Pagan's Mind. Our singer's influences are Aretha Franklin and(the only match) Coheed and Cambria. We make it work. You can too.

Well you all like some kind of Metal in one way or another.

In our case how do you go about mixing Foals with Motörhead?
Current Gear:
Peavey Zodiac DE Scorpio (Bass)
Yamaha RBX-170 (Bass)
Boss ODB-3 (Overdrive Pedal)
Line 6 LowDown 150 (Amp)
#8
Quote by Silveroon009
Well you all like some kind of Metal in one way or another.

In our case how do you go about mixing Foals with Motörhead?

look I'm not gonna lie dude, just jam you guys will get used to it, in my band my singer is into green day and rise against (punk bands along those lines and a ton of pop punk) the lead guitar is way into metalica and slayer (pretty much the big four), our bassist is way into tool and deep purple, our drummer is all about rap and hip hop with his big influences being dmx and other gansta rap artists, and I'm more into other music my biggest influences being korn our lady peace and stone temple pilots, btw I'm rhythm guitar for the most part.

I mean this is a pretty odd combination of musical influences that dont really overlap much if at all. how ever we just kind of jamed together for a few weeks before we decided it was "right'', now we can bust out a jam that sounds like a cohesive piece of music with out even talking about it first. it just takes listening to eachother play and figureing out where to go from there. sometimes it helps to learn a couple of songs together (if you guys are new to bands[you know like its your first or second band or whatever]) it just helps you guys come up with a sort of structure, but jamming together will help, everyone has some sort of cue to point you in the right direction as to where they are going, and the only way you will ever learn them is if you jam. its all about trial and error, and eventually the error part pretty much goes away.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.