#1
Would gluing a metal locking nut to the neck of my guitar have any negative effects in the long term? Lets say I want to replace the nut, how would I go about removing the nut if I glue it to the neck?

I ask because I recently discovered exactly what was causing my guitar to go out of tune whenever I use the trem. I turns out the nut isn't secured enough to the neck, so the nut is actually shifting in it's place, throwing the guitar out of tune. The obvious solution would be the tighten the nut screws, but that's not working, so I plan on gluing the nut to the neck.

Any advice?
#2
Wont work. Locking nuts are too heavy and they need to be screwed in. Take the guitar to a tech and have them fix it, or buy a new nut/screws from allparts and replace the old one.
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#3
Quote by stonyman65
Wont work. Locking nuts are too heavy and they need to be screwed in. Take the guitar to a tech and have them fix it, or buy a new nut/screws from allparts and replace the old one.

+1
Try putting something like loc tite on the screws and tightening it down.
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#4
Quote by stonyman65
Wont work. Locking nuts are too heavy and they need to be screwed in. Take the guitar to a tech and have them fix it, or buy a new nut/screws from allparts and replace the old one.

What do you mean by too heavy?

I'm still going to screw the locking nut in, but there's a little gap between the side (not the bottom) of the locking nut, between the nut and the fretboard, and it seems like a drop or two of wood or super glue would be enough to prevent the nut from sliding back and forth.
Last edited by zincabopataurio at Apr 17, 2011,
#5
it sounds like the threading in the wood where your nut screws go is worn out.

Maybe if you put a small wooden shim between the nut and the start of the fretboard it would prevent the nut from sliding?

Don't use super glue or gorilla glue when attaching any kind of nut, you may end of tearing your wood if you try removing it in the future. I use Elmer's wood glue, and some people even dilute wood glue with water before using it to attach a nut. But I'd have to agree with the above poster. A lucking nut is way heavier than other nuts and gluing it probably woundn't work
#6
Quote by zincabopataurio
What do you mean by too heavy?

I'm still going to screw the locking nut in, but there's a little gap between the side (not the bottom) of the locking nut, between the nut and the fretboard, and it seems like a drop or two of wood or super glue would be enough to prevent the nut from sliding back and forth.


A gap between the nut and the fretboard is a problem.... your intonation will never be correct. You need to shove the nut as close to the fretboard as possible. There should be no gap.

If it were my guitar, I'd remove the nut and make sure the wood in the screw holes wasn't loose and shredding apart. Then soak the holes in thin CA glue. I'd replace the bolts and nuts that hold the nut on and use blue loctite on the bolts. If you want to glue your nut on (I wouldn't) I'd use white glue or a thick CA. CA is nice because you just tap on the side of the nut and it breaks loose to remove it and you can sand or file the CA residue.

Whatever you do, you don't want the nut to be raised (unless you are already getting buzzing because the nut is too low) and you don't want it to be pushed away from the fretboard.
Last edited by samhell at Apr 18, 2011,
#7
It sounds like the threads in the nut have been worn.

I'd just replace the nut and bolts and use loctite blue thread lock on the new bolts.
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#8
The best thing to do and the most permenant solution is to glue in some dowelling into the holes, let them cure and redrill the holes very carefully. Best leave the job to someone who has some experience doing this
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#9
I would encourage you to try fixing it yourself, because its really rather simple work. Of course, if you think your skills suck and the guitar is worth a lot, maybe getting someone else to do it is better, but you'll never get experience if you dont try.