#1
So last night I went to a show and was blown away at how a guy was not only doing a 12 bar shuffle in E, just straight triplet feel but he was throwing in C#m chords in there, and everything.

Is there a source somewhere I can read on adding a bit more spice to the variation of chords used? So far I've just been using a mix of major chords and 7th chords, legato-ing into chords and walking the bassline/comping.
#2
jacmuse.com is the website, read it all
Rig:
Jay Turser ES-335 w/ 2 Burstbuckers OR
J&E Custom w Duncan SSL3 and SHL59>
MXR Dynacomp>
Ibanez TS-9>
Dunlop Crybaby>
Fender Hot Rod DeVille 212
effects loop:
Boss BD-2>
Danelectro Vibe>
Boss DD-6>
Morley Volume

my shit screams.
#3
go to the chord substitutions section specifically
Rig:
Jay Turser ES-335 w/ 2 Burstbuckers OR
J&E Custom w Duncan SSL3 and SHL59>
MXR Dynacomp>
Ibanez TS-9>
Dunlop Crybaby>
Fender Hot Rod DeVille 212
effects loop:
Boss BD-2>
Danelectro Vibe>
Boss DD-6>
Morley Volume

my shit screams.
#4
Quote by FlexEXP
So last night I went to a show and was blown away at how a guy was not only doing a 12 bar shuffle in E, just straight triplet feel but he was throwing in C#m chords in there, and everything.

Is there a source somewhere I can read on adding a bit more spice to the variation of chords used? So far I've just been using a mix of major chords and 7th chords, legato-ing into chords and walking the bassline/comping.


Assuming that the chord progression was a straight I - IV - V, it's more likely that the guitarist was playing E major/7 rather than the C#m.

See the C#m chord can look like this.

4
5
6
6
4
4

Now lets make it a 7th chord.

4
5
4
6
4
4

Now lets only play the top 4 strings.

4
5
4
6
x
x

It's E major.

Want something different? Let's add a 7th to the bottom of that E.

4
5
4
6
5
x

It's E7.

My point is that it could look like C#min, but is more likely Emaj or E7. So it's not really a substitution, just voicing the chord differently.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
My point is that it could look like C#min, but is more likely Emaj or E7. So it's not really a substitution, just voicing the chord differently.

could have also been used as a ii-V to the B7 chord.
generally, the easiest way to squeeze more chords into a blues is by using backcycling. essentially, adding a turnaround (either ii-V iii-VI-ii-V, or sometimes as simple as using a secondary dominant or leading tone) before the I IV or V chord. you could take a blues that looks like this (the / indicates a bar line).
F7/ Bb7/ F7/ F7/
Bb7/ Bb7/ F7/ F7/
C7/ C7/ F7/ F7/

and add turnarounds to the I IV and V chords to get
F7/ Bb7/ F7/ Cm F7/
Bb7/Bb7/ F7/ Dm7 G7/
C7/C7/ F7 A7/G7 C7

moreover, you can also add the flat nine tension to a dominant chord (letting the dominant chord function like a leading tone chord built on any of the notes contained therin but the root--so an F7b9 can resolve like an A diminished seventh, C diminished seventh, F# diminished seventh or a Eb diminished seventh), to get a bit more motion going on, giving you
F7 F7b9/Bb7 Bb7b9/F7/ Cm7 F7/
Bb7/Bb7b9/F7/Dm G7/
C7/ C7b9/ F7 A7/ G7 C7.
also, if you want you can add more backycycling (for example, in the 7th bar you could add a C# dim7 or an A7 before the dm7) and you can replace any dominant chord with a minor chord a 5th up, or a minor seven flat 5 chord a third up.
mikedodge has an article called 'jazzing up your blues', which probably explains this stuff better then i did.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#8
Quote by FlexEXP
So last night I went to a show and was blown away at how a guy was not only doing a 12 bar shuffle in E, just straight triplet feel but he was throwing in C#m chords in there, and everything.

Is there a source somewhere I can read on adding a bit more spice to the variation of chords used? So far I've just been using a mix of major chords and 7th chords, legato-ing into chords and walking the bassline/comping.



It sounds like a V - I move to me, where he'd be barring the 4th implying B and then playing what would look like C#m but in fact is E/G#, I've been doing that kind of thing for years.

Sean
#9
Quote by JRKul393
go to the chord substitutions section specifically


I guess I must be blind because I can't find that section!
#10
Quote by AlanHB
Assuming that the chord progression was a straight I - IV - V, it's more likely that the guitarist was playing E major/7 rather than the C#m.

See the C#m chord can look like this.

4
5
6
6
4
4


It was one of those C#m's that Hendrix plays, the one on the 9th fret so I'm sure of it since that's how I play most of my chords, like Jimi.

But I get what you're saying. :-)
#11
Quote by Sean0913
It sounds like a V - I move to me, where he'd be barring the 4th implying B and then playing what would look like C#m but in fact is E/G#, I've been doing that kind of thing for years.

Sean


I sent you a PM.
#14
Honestly, it's just a vi. That's it. He played a vi in a blues, big whoop. Another common one would be the ii because it could be used for a ii V I turnaround. vi could be used to go through a longer cycle of fifths, vi ii V I.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Apr 18, 2011,
#15
Quote by FlexEXP
It was one of those C#m's that Hendrix plays, the one on the 9th fret so I'm sure of it since that's how I play most of my chords, like Jimi.

But I get what you're saying. :-)


Umm, I think you may want to learn a bit more about chords. If you think that Hendrix only played those "E shape" chords, you're sorely mistaken. I can quite easily change the other C#m into an E/E7 as well without changing position on the fretboard.

Otherwise, it may just be a C#m in a blues song as noted above.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#16
Going off my previous post, check out this and others of John Mayer's more bluesy songs, he uses some of these other diatonic chords in a blues setting a lot.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#17
I bought Robben Fords Art of the Blues Rhythm DVD and its great and some of it is relevant to what you are asking. I then torrented his earlier tuition book / CD called Blues Rhythms and that has a lot more examples of ways to play 12 bars (including most of the examples in the DVD but many more aswell). I reccomend you grab one of those.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do