#1
I have this weird habit of picking and I don't know how to stop it.

When I play, -especially alternate picking-, My pick gets caught on my string, and the string just stops my pick. I can't figure out why, but I have this issue and Its really holding me back...

any tips?
#2
Try using a sharper, more narrow pick. OR you could move your pick higher. Hope I helped.
#3
Also switch to a thinner pick. They give more, so they don't really get caught as much. Ultra-light picks ftw!
#4
You could try turning your pick on an angle. Meaning you kind of turn it on its side (only a bit) so it slides off more than anything.

I just experimented at first with how much angle until it felt right but it improved my playing alot.
#5
Use a thinner pick, or stop picking so deep into the string.

I've been using Dunlop gel mediums for about a year now. They're fantastic (:
#6
This same thing happens to me a lot of the time and it's really more of a bad habit that seemed to form because I never used to have it, but I've been trying to figure out ways to correct it. I've found that trying to relax your hand more helps because your picking hand is probably very tense as you're trying to not let your pick get caught but ironically as a result that's what happens. Just don't focus on it and play naturally. Sometimes I find that positioning my hand different on the bridge helps too as well as the angle that you hold your pick. Hope this helps man
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#7
I remember when I had that problem.. Grip the pick tighter and closer, so you touch the string with the tip only. Shred!
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#8
check your pick and see if its cracked, it happens to me with thinner picks all the time, which is why I prefeer thicker picks....

also adjust your hand so that only the tip of the pick is visible, the less the pick passes the string on the bottom the faster you can play and the less force is needed to make sound, not to mention the fact that your picks ans strings will probably last longer....
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#9
I use a 2 m pick i had that problem aswell. more so on the low E string. It was all because i didnt angle my pick any. it was fine for playing slow didnt really foresee any problems. But you go playing faster. And accenting notes ull notice.

I break thinner picks to. so I dont use them. cept nylon jim dunlop picks. It also seems it takes more movement with thinner picks. But everyone is different.

your pick should be no more then 45 degree angle. mine is prolly around 30 or so.
#10
1 - angle the pick. ( this means do not perpendiculary cut into the string)
_________(pick)--______
______(pick) /__________

2 - relax your hand :P

hope this helps
#11
Quote by C_Sleezy
I have this weird habit of picking and I don't know how to stop it.

When I play, -especially alternate picking-, My pick gets caught on my string, and the string just stops my pick. I can't figure out why, but I have this issue and Its really holding me back...

any tips?

Play slower. That's it. If you play at a comfortable speed this will never happen.
I hate my sig
#12
It's 2 different things that are more than likely creating this problem for you.

#1. You could be picking too deep.
- This normally only occurs when picking single strings. However, it can also occur at the beginning of any chord. If you are doing this then simply pick the strings higher.
#2. You are not holding the pick correctly.
- To me, there are mainly 2 different types of ways to hold a pick.
1) The first way is for strumming chords and easy solos/single note picking. This way involves you to hold your pick at about a -45 degree angle (considering that your a righty, if not then a normal 45 degree angle). Your thumb should be about 6/8ths the way down the pick. This will give you plenty of grip on the pick so even if you do get stuck on a string then it won't fall out of your fingers.
2) The second way is mainly for harder & usually faster picking solos. This way involves you to hold the pick the same way (maybe even at a slightly higher angle). This time, your thumb should be scooted down on the pick some more to about the 7/8ths point on the pick (just like if you were going to try an artificial/pinch harmonic). Also, bring the pick a little closer to the beginning of your index finger. This will give you a great grip on the pick and you will be able to do artificial harmonics whenever you need to without having to change your grip. This will also help you to pick faster.

These are just the ways that I hold my pick and they work pretty much flawlessly for me.