#1
I've been playing guitar for 2 years and a few months, and I've finally reached the point where im no longer a beginner, and can play atleast somewhat competently (I hope!).
A friend of mine offered one of her friends forme to teach her guitar, I contacted her on facebook, and she says she's keen, now i'm not 100% sure how to progress.

1) How do you teach an absolute beginner? She seems very enthusiastic/excited to learn, but I dont know where to begin. Should I ask her what some of her favourite songs are, learn them, see what needs to be know to play them, and start there? (Ofcourse, teaching her the basics of how to hold a pick/posture/fretting first!)

2) I'm pretty sure this doesnt belong in this forum, but I dont feel like making two threads so.... - She answered me back on facebook saying she really wants to learn and has her own guitar, but sucks etc...... should I message her back about organising something now, or should i just say, "Tell me the kind of stuff you want to play, and we'll organise something next week"
Im not really sure what to do right now, do I go to her house for this thing?

(Yes, I know that probably belonged in the relationship thread, but whatever.....)
#4
Quote by hawk_kst
Just don't over think it, try and teach her the basics, it'll take a while before you can actually try and teach her a song... Start with basic technique and maybe a riff or two, you know, the usual 7 nation army/ smoke on the water stuff (=



Why would you start with techniques before even teaching her to HOLD the instrument properly and how NOT to hold it?
#5
Quote by XianXiuHong
Why would you start with techniques before even teaching her to HOLD the instrument properly and how NOT to hold it?

Because if she's got an instrument herself then I'm assuming she's picked it up =P
Also, that's so basic it's not even worth the mention... It literally takes a second to show some one how to hold a guitar...
It's like saying you should show someone how to unlock a car before driving it- it's so obvious it goes without saying.
#6
Because giving her something easy she can use will make her far more likely to *care* how to hold the instrument "properly".

I agree, you need a balance between easy songs for her that she can get her teeth into right away and start playing, and a foundation of chords and light theory to help her advance and go long-term.
#7
Quote by hawk_kst
Because if she's got an instrument herself then I'm assuming she's picked it up =P
Also, that's so basic it's not even worth the mention... It literally takes a second to show some one how to hold a guitar...
It's like saying you should show someone how to unlock a car before driving it- it's so obvious it goes without saying.



How you unlock a car doesn't affect how you drive.
#8
Quote by XianXiuHong
How you unlock a car doesn't affect how you drive.

And how you hold an instrument doesn't affect it's tone or the possibilities of playing it...
If you want I can post many a video of the different ways a guitar can be held
My point was it's common sense and you completely missed my original point which was to start off with basic technique and something that sounds cool to keep her interest in the instrument...
If it's all hard theory on how to play it classically correct she'll drop it within seconds.
Last edited by hawk_kst at Apr 18, 2011,
#10
Quote by XianXiuHong
How you unlock a car doesn't affect how you drive.
it does if it's not your car lol
#12
Quote by hawk_kst
And how you hold an instrument doesn't affect it's tone or the possibilities of playing it...
If you want I can post many a video of the different ways a guitar can be held
My point was it's common sense and you completely missed my original point which was to start off with basic technique and something that sounds cool to keep her interest in the instrument...
If it's all hard theory on how to play it classically correct she'll drop it within seconds.



Yes it does, but you're missing my point here, if she's not holding it comfortably, it's going to affect both her tone and how she plays it.

I know the different ways a guitar can be held, I'm a guitar major at the Sydney Con.

Of course you should have basic technique and stuff involved there but showing her how to hold the guitar correctly takes up what? 2 minutes? Those 2 minutes will probably save her a bit of discomfort later in the future and will keep her more interested in the instrument because playing isn't as much of a hassle when you hold the instrument properly.

But hey, if you want to continue with that driving analogy, there's more than one way to sit and drive a car and how to hold the steering wheel and some are more comfortable than others and some are more efficient than others.
#13
This is a Quick Scale finder, should help.

[mod edit] ******link removed because I don't trust it**********
tinyURLs and the like are only for people with something to hide.
#15
Quote by hawk_kst
And how you hold an instrument doesn't affect it's tone or the possibilities of playing it...
If you want I can post many a video of the different ways a guitar can be held
My point was it's common sense and you completely missed my original point which was to start off with basic technique and something that sounds cool to keep her interest in the instrument...
If it's all hard theory on how to play it classically correct she'll drop it within seconds.


clearly you never learned how to really play guitar (or at least you never learned why you shouldn't hold it certian ways), because if the way you hold the guitar causes too much tension you can hurt yourself, and cause injuries that can force you to not be able to play ever again. so yeah her interest in the instrument is totally useless if she gives herself cts or tendonitis (and yes for some people these things can develop with in a year, and can be so bad that they cant even actaully play the guitar anymore without intense pain)....

TS the very first thing I teach any student is how to properly hold the guitar and the parts of the guitar. then I teach them how to tune it, including how to use a tuner and how to tune it by ear. after that I show them how to hold the pick, or how to position their hand if they want to learn finger picking. the next thing, and usually the final thing in the first lesson, is usually a colection of simple riffs and several chords in tab format.

I hope this helped, also when it comes to teaching anyone anything just think back to how you learned (its usually the best place to start).
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
Last edited by krypticguitar87 at Apr 19, 2011,
#17
I taught my Current rhythm guitarist to play, its easy just play something you know theyll want to play, with sheer brutality and then be like practice makes amazing guitar skills, and go through a bar section a week with said person. but for the love of god teach them theory Like guitar holding techniques, hand positions, Hand shapes (g chord - a minor and such) do this across a few weeks. best way to make sure they know where the frets are teach them something and when they can play it at a good standard blindfold them. i gave my guitarist a finger strength deal thing and its very help. i also threw some 11's on the guitar while i was using 09's to build finger dexterity.

RULE NUMBER ONE DEATH METAL IS NOT TEACHING! INFACT METAL IS NOT TEACHING!

Yes im an extreme metal head but i teach blues and jazz because it requires skill
Gear:
Guitars:
1. Epiphone Custom Shop Explorer Apparition
2. BC Rich Iron Bird 2003 LTD Spaceface
3. Gould KK Series LTD Reaper 600
4. BC Rich Warbeast WMD
5. Cort X6 Custom
6. Dradnaught Acoustic
Last edited by MidnightReaper at Apr 19, 2011,
#18
Just do what you do, i know you can do it, if you are confident that you can do it then do it...


_______________________
***link removed by moderator*** - please don't advertise in your posts.
#19
Quote by krypticguitar87
clearly you never learned how to really play guitar (or at least you never learned why you shouldn't hold it certian ways), because if the way you hold the guitar causes too much tension you can hurt yourself, and cause injuries that can force you to not be able to play ever again. so yeah her interest in the instrument is totally useless if she gives herself cts or tendonitis (and yes for some people these things can develop with in a year, and can be so bad that they cant even actaully play the guitar anymore without intense pain)....

TS the very first thing I teach any student is how to properly hold the guitar and the parts of the guitar. then I teach them how to tune it, including how to use a tuner and how to tune it by ear. after that I show them how to hold the pick, or how to position their hand if they want to learn finger picking. the next thing, and usually the final thing in the first lesson, is usually a colection of simple riffs and several chords in tab format.

I hope this helped, also when it comes to teaching anyone anything just think back to how you learned (its usually the best place to start).



Thank you.
#20
Quote by MidnightReaper
RULE NUMBER ONE DEATH METAL IS NOT TEACHING! INFACT METAL IS NOT TEACHING!

Yes im an extreme metal head but i teach blues and jazz because it requires skill


What? No offense, but Metal requires just as much skill as blues and jazz at times, seeing as a lot of metal nowadays is classically influenced. It's a good idea to teach a few metal bits to improve technique and introduce people to other techniques that they can use in their playing. Even some Death is useful, I know it's Melodic Death, but I find that teaching people sections from Kalmah songs improves technique, timekeeping and general musicianship, so don't rule out metal. It's all about engaging your students, and I know that if my guitar teacher had forced me into blues and jazz when it was painfully obvious I wanted to go the Neoclassical/Power Metal route, he wouldn't have been my guitar teacher for much longer.
#21
Thanks for the advice guys. Just one more question, should I start teaching tab on the very first lesson, or should I wait a bit?
#22
I'd do some of both (the notes of the staff and how to read tab, both are relevent for the guitar), this way the student gets to hear themself play something familiar/ something they like.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#23
The easy way? Download an instructional video of teaching. Study how the teacher teaches and plan a method.
Ibanez RG2550Z
Line6 Spider IV 150W
#24
Simply play simple song.... break it down chord by chord bro... Many suggestion about guitar lesson, but i never see people fail with this kind of lesson, by learning songs.

Start the easy one, and if she really interesting, start to get video lesson...
#25
1. tell lots of thing about guitar before starting. show her some dreams. tell her how you started how happy you are to learn guitar. give her some example of great guitar master pieces. How she can benefited by learning from you.

2. give her some free hand exercise which i saw in petruchi vide. and told her how to practice hold a guitar , sit with guitar or stand with it. how much time she should practice.

3. start with fingering and continue with at least 2 month. like 1234,1243,1324,1342 etc.

4. teach her the guitar shapes like ionian, darian etc.

5. now change the scales like ionain in g, c, d, b etc.

6. some blues scale and pentatonic scale.

7. harmonic minor, melodic minor shape.

8. 7 in many scales.

9. arpegios in different shape and nots and go on..................................................................................................................................................................................
Last edited by finding_nimo at Apr 28, 2011,
#26
OP, remember that nobody can teach anyone anything!!! So dont think of yourself as a teacher, at best your a shower/instructor.

The best you can hope to do is show her what you know, its up to her if she wants to use your advise or not. Remember you don't know everything, so you can't show her everything and don't get upset if she doesnt apply everything you do show her. The best thing for a beginner is to keep it simple, but also show her diffrent ways to look at things. As we grow as musicans and as people we hear alot of diffrent and contradictory things... its up to the individual to listen to all of these diffrent view points and choose the ones that they belive apply best to them.

Because what works for one person, rairly works for another!!!

The one peice of advise I would suggest you start with, is showing her how to listen... as a musican that is the most important tool you will ever have. You can show her all the theory and technique in the world. At the end of the day music theroy is nothing more than "the study of music", and to study music you have to first listen to it.

Have her listen to her favorite music, and discus it with her. Ask her simple questions that make her think and help her form her own opinions. For example if two of her favorite musicans are Miles Davis and BB King, start talking about how they use phrasing. Things like that are what great instructors do, they help others explore the lesser travelled aspect of music. Not just the technical parts such as where do i put my fingers, or how to build a chord... because if thats all they wanted they can find a good chunk of the technicall information in a $20 music theory book.
Quote by MetlHed94



Well played, sir, well played.
Last edited by TheMooseKnuckle at Apr 28, 2011,
#27
Quote by GoldfishMoon
I've been playing guitar for 2 years and a few months, and I've finally reached the point where im no longer a beginner, and can play atleast somewhat competently (I hope!).
A friend of mine offered one of her friends forme to teach her guitar, I contacted her on facebook, and she says she's keen, now i'm not 100% sure how to progress.


Did you ever get formal training? Are you to a point in guitar where you can teach this person without imparting ANY ****-ups whatsoever? IMO 2 years is not at all a lot of time to get good at guitar. Even after 5, I still felt like I couldn't teach someone everything since I'm still refining technique to be razor sharp.

Do you play 10 hours a day? If so, then you may qualify. If you play like 1 hour every 2 days... I honestly think you should just recommend her to a good guitar teacher and give her little tidbits of info for free.
#28
Quote by AtomicBirdy
Did you ever get formal training? Are you to a point in guitar where you can teach this person without imparting ANY ****-ups whatsoever? IMO 2 years is not at all a lot of time to get good at guitar. Even after 5, I still felt like I couldn't teach someone everything since I'm still refining technique to be razor sharp.

Do you play 10 hours a day? If so, then you may qualify. If you play like 1 hour every 2 days... I honestly think you should just recommend her to a good guitar teacher and give her little tidbits of info for free.

I gotta disagree, when you have more experience than someone else, there is always something you can teach them. also if you are constatnly waiting till you are an amazing guitarist, you will never teach anyone because even the best are still refining their skills.

It's not about teaching them everything, more teaching them everything you know. as a teacher, or instructor or whatever you like to call them, you do nothing more than give your students the tools to move ahead. even if you cannot teach them all there is to know, you will still give them something to start with. I've only been playing for eight years and I've never had a problem teaching anyone how to play, it's just when they get to a certian point I tell them that I have no more to teach them and I recommend a couple of people in the area that can further their musical education.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#29
I tried to teach an ex. I didnt really want to do it, I wanted to go out and party but I figured a quick lesson wouldnt kill me. so without even bothering to ask what if anything she knew, I just jumped straight in to building chords from intervals. sure its a lot to take in, but once you get it its infinitely more useful than learning random chord shapes.

I dont think she understood what i meant while i was yelling "no stupid. what the **** is wrong with you? WHOLE WHOLE HALF WHOLE WHOLE WHOLE HALF"
"I can see that we speak the wrong notes."

Warlock NJ Deluxe (haters gonna hate)
Crate EL-10G
Last edited by satanicgurrl at Apr 29, 2011,
#30
Quote by krypticguitar87
I gotta disagree, when you have more experience than someone else, there is always something you can teach them. also if you are constatnly waiting till you are an amazing guitarist, you will never teach anyone because even the best are still refining their skills.

It's not about teaching them everything, more teaching them everything you know. as a teacher, or instructor or whatever you like to call them, you do nothing more than give your students the tools to move ahead. even if you cannot teach them all there is to know, you will still give them something to start with. I've only been playing for eight years and I've never had a problem teaching anyone how to play, it's just when they get to a certian point I tell them that I have no more to teach them and I recommend a couple of people in the area that can further their musical education.


I don't disagree with you, but for sake of discussion :
what if you teach them the wrong way, and they go through life thinking its the proper way and do damage to themselves in the long run due to some ill advice that the teacher did not know about due to experience?
#31
Quote by AtomicBirdy
I don't disagree with you, but for sake of discussion :
what if you teach them the wrong way, and they go through life thinking its the proper way and do damage to themselves in the long run due to some ill advice that the teacher did not know about due to experience?

teaching them the wrong way is different, but a good teacher knows what he or she can teach, and refuses to try to teach beyond their abilities.

personally I don't teach anything that I don't know for a fact, so when I got a student who says can you teach me the fastest way to learn sweeping, I tell them that I have not mastered sweeping yet, I can only get some three and four string patterns... so I teach them the very basics of what sweeping is, but I don't go further, instead I point them to someone who can. although the weird thing about that is most of the students I get that ask about sweeping have only been playing for maybe a month or two and seen their fav metal guitarist do it , and usually they really aren't ready.

but yes I agree, but a teacher should always be aware of their own capabilities, and teach things accordingly, and NEVER teach outside their own abilities.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#32
I'm still a beginner...
but did you ask her if she wants to learn music theory?

Because I think after showing her something on guitar, asking her which kind of music she likes etc. some basic music theory would be a good start.

I started guitar 2 months ago, my teacher teched stuff in this order, so far:

-1st lesson: some basic music theory, notes, how to write them down, what are chords, arpeggios, and melody, how you write them; tones and semitones (ok, it was fast because I already known something of this stuff); checked in 2 min how I hold a guitar, told me how to hold the pick.
He also told me something about rithms.
Than he wrote me down the G chord, the E minor chord, the A minor chord, and the D7 chord.
My "homework" was to try to play this in sequence and try 'em in six-eight time (used dictionary, so I'm not sure if it's the right way to say that).

The second lesson he checked what I learned in a week of time (obiously instead of the right rithm I did 1/16...so had to learn the right way); he wrote me down the chords to play "Knocking on heaven's door" and some more chords (Bminor, C, F, D, A) and the first pattern for scales (not sure again if it's the right way to say in english).

For me this was a good start, I had enought stuff to work on (scale, barre, rhytms and some theory).
Hope this may help, and sorry for my english.
#34
Here's what my first guitar teacher showed me on the first lesson:

The different parts of the guitar - tuning pegs, headstock, nut and so forth. He showed me what string was what E, A etc and showed me the chromatic scale to practise my fingering - 1234 etc

That's where I'd start, at least. Print out a chord chart so she can practise open chords in her own time.