#1
So, I started to learn the scales, first one im doin is C major. However, theres some things I need to know. First of all, whats the difference between major and minor?
aside from that, I understand that I should be learning these scales...but..what am I supposed to be learning from the scales itself? I know there must be more to it then just learning how to play them. I think im supposed to be paying attention to something, but idk what it is. It doesnt help that idk music theory, and for anyone says to learn it. well Ive tried...desperately. im thinking that maybe Im just incapable of understanding music. All these letters throw me off.
Speakin of the letters, whats the order that they go in? does it go from highest to lowest or what? I
Then theres the two e strings on a guitar. Ones low, and ones high, yet still an e... how? this stuff makes my head spin...and I desperately want to learn to play guitar... but all this crap, and my current rut of no progress... idk what to do anymore.
#2
learn the note names as you go and you'll save yourself alot of time down the road. sounds like thats where your stuck anyways.
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Last edited by BurningTurkey at Apr 19, 2011,
#3
first of all major and minor are very similar... but you should focus on learning the major scale first, then worry about minor and it's relation to major later.

next learning the intervals of a major scale and the notes with in them helps you understand chords and everything else that has to do with theory much beter. so focus on learning and understanding the major scale.

the notes recognized in western theory (this is what you are begining to learn) are as fallows:

G#/Ab A A#/Bb B C C#/Db D D#/Eb E F F#/Gb G G#/Ab

there is one semitone/half step between each of these notes. one half sted = 1 fret, so e|-0-1-| is moving up one half step.

when learning the major scale you will see it writen from deepest to highest so Cmajor is C D E F G A B C

I do have a few questions for you though, how are you learning theory? teacher? online lessons? free? paid?
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#4
you need to learn the musical alphabet
A A# B C D D# E F# G G#

if youve tuned your guitar you should know that its tuned
e thinnest string
B
G
D
A
Ethickest string
each fret is a half step higher (the first fret on the A string would be an A#)

the two Es you were talking about where different octaves of it its the same note but higher
this ought to clear things up for you
#5
Im attempting to be self taught, I have no money (or time) to learn from a teacher or whatever. circumstances...just dont work.
ok, so... first off, whats an octave? (explain it for a musically illiterate person please)

so... If the note you play is like.. a F#, then you need to go two frets (which should be one step if im understanding that correctly) then you'll get a a G#?
and are the sharps and flats just different octaves of notes? (and why are there no sharps for B C E and G)?
#6
Quote by BurningTurkey
learn the note names as you go and you'll save yourself alot of time down the road. sounds like thats where your stuck anyways.


How do I learn the notes?
#8
good stuff so far but I think MT is the best place for this thread
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#9
There are no sharps or flats between e and f, and, b and c. One way to learn the notes is to start on the fifth and sixth strings and learn some of the notes on these two strings. You can then use octave shapes to name the others. It takes time but will come.

Got a free lesson here if your interested

http://stuartmoirguitartuition.co.uk/NamingTheNotes.aspx
#10
Quote by Iblis92
So, I started to learn the scales, first one im doin is C major. However, theres some things I need to know. First of all, whats the difference between major and minor?
aside from that, I understand that I should be learning these scales...but..what am I supposed to be learning from the scales itself? I know there must be more to it then just learning how to play them. I think im supposed to be paying attention to something, but idk what it is. It doesnt help that idk music theory, and for anyone says to learn it. well Ive tried...desperately. im thinking that maybe Im just incapable of understanding music. All these letters throw me off.
Speakin of the letters, whats the order that they go in? does it go from highest to lowest or what? I
Then theres the two e strings on a guitar. Ones low, and ones high, yet still an e... how? this stuff makes my head spin...and I desperately want to learn to play guitar... but all this crap, and my current rut of no progress... idk what to do anymore.


There are many questions to unpick here. One important one is effectively "why learn scales?". When you learn a scale, you're learning notes that sound good together and that will work together to produce a certain overall sound or effect, depending on the scale. If you and another musician are playing the same scale you can improvise notes or chords with some confidence that it will sound good and achieve the musical effect you want.

There are two E strings on a guitar. The higher one vibrates exactly 4 times as fast as the lower one. Whenever there's a multiple of 2 ratio between two notes our ears hear a strong similarity between the pitches. The two pitches will function harmonically in much the same way. Hence the convention is to call them by the same note name.

This is a bit of a simplification; there's a little more to it - involving overtones and so on, but I hope you get the idea.

An octave is the difference in pitch between a note and another note in which the vibrations are exactly twice as fast. These two notes will have the same name, as described above.
#11
Quote by Iblis92
So, I started to learn the scales, first one im doin is C major. However, theres some things I need to know. First of all, whats the difference between major and minor?
aside from that, I understand that I should be learning these scales...but..what am I supposed to be learning from the scales itself? I know there must be more to it then just learning how to play them. I think im supposed to be paying attention to something, but idk what it is. It doesnt help that idk music theory, and for anyone says to learn it. well Ive tried...desperately. im thinking that maybe Im just incapable of understanding music. All these letters throw me off.
Speakin of the letters, whats the order that they go in? does it go from highest to lowest or what? I
Then theres the two e strings on a guitar. Ones low, and ones high, yet still an e... how? this stuff makes my head spin...and I desperately want to learn to play guitar... but all this crap, and my current rut of no progress... idk what to do anymore.


You aren't incapable of learning and understanding music theory or guitar. It depends on what is taught, when it's taught and how it's taught. I'd stake my whole reputation on it. I think being self taught is just very, very hard, and it sounds like that's whats dragging you down and frustrating you.

You sound like you just need a little direction. I can tell you really want to play and understand guitar. Are private lessons an option at all for you?

Also I private mentor guitarists for free. Not a doubt I could help you.

Best,

Sean
#12
Quote by Iblis92
So, I started to learn the scales, first one im doin is C major. However, theres some things I need to know. First of all, whats the difference between major and minor?
aside from that, I understand that I should be learning these scales...but..what am I supposed to be learning from the scales itself? I know there must be more to it then just learning how to play them. I think im supposed to be paying attention to something, but idk what it is. It doesnt help that idk music theory, and for anyone says to learn it. well Ive tried...desperately. im thinking that maybe Im just incapable of understanding music. All these letters throw me off.
Speakin of the letters, whats the order that they go in? does it go from highest to lowest or what? I
Then theres the two e strings on a guitar. Ones low, and ones high, yet still an e... how? this stuff makes my head spin...and I desperately want to learn to play guitar... but all this crap, and my current rut of no progress... idk what to do anymore.


What you should be learning from learning the major scale is how to construct it, if you just memorize the pattern then you're doing yourself a huge injustice. I find that the best part about drilling scales over and over when you're first starting out is that they get your fingers and hands into shape so you're physicaly capable of playing the instrument. As for the difference between the High E and the Low E string on the guitar is that they're two octaves apart. To explain what an octave is you need to know you're musical alphabet as someone else has already said and posted, but I'll type it out again: A A#/Bb B C C#/Db D D#/Eb E F F#/Gb G G#/Ab A.... And then it repeats again and again and again. The difference between the first A and the last A in that sequence is that they're one octave apart, which is just saying the second A sounds twice as high as the first A.
#13
Quote by Iblis92
How do I learn the notes?

i just plugged my guitar into my tuner and went up one fret at a time. its pretty easy. just read up on theory and spend some time TRYING to figure it out
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#15
ok, so since this "noob theory" thread is here i might ask as well:

how do you people know what chords go well together in a progression? Lets say B, C and Amin chords, what should i look at when deciding in what sequence to use these chords? A certain scale (lets say C major/A minor in this case)? Maybe some other rules or something exists?

basically, how would you put these 3 chords? Why like that?And why (if any) chords shouldn't be used when playing certain scale?

I would be very grateful if you would answer these questions or maybe throw a link where it is explained

EDIT: grammer is srsly haerdz

EDIT2: nevermind, i think theory thread has it all covered
Last edited by hr113 at Apr 20, 2011,
#16
Quote by hr113
ok, so since this "noob theory" thread is here i might ask as well:

how do you people know what chords go well together in a progression? Lets say B, C and Amin chords, what should i look at when deciding in what sequence to use these chords? A certain scale (lets say C major/A minor in this case)? Maybe some other rules or something exists?

basically, how would you put these 3 chords? Why like that?And why (if any) chords shouldn't be used when playing certain scale?

I would be very grateful if you would answer these questions or maybe throw a link where it is explained

EDIT: grammer is srsly haerdz

EDIT2: nevermind, i think theory thread has it all covered


To answer that, learn to write out all the letters in any Major scale. Then Google the concept of the Harmonized Major Scale

Best,

Sean
#17
TS, there are 12 notes in our musical alphabet. They fill up the range of an octave, then repeat as you go up and down into different octaves. Two notes an octave apart have the same function in relation to other notes (for example, C to E is going to have the same relation whether the E is an octave up or down or whatever). Also, if you play the same note in two different octaves (such as the low E and the high E strings, which are two octaves apart), they will harmonize perfectly.

To get technical, I'll talk about pitch frequencies. Let's take A4 (the 5th fret on the high E string), which is 440 Hz. The number 4 in "A4" is scientific pitch notation specifying which octave the A is in. So, if you take the A an octave down from that, A3, it's going to have half the frequency, so 220 Hz. A Hertz (Hz) is how many cycles the sound wave makes in a second. Since A4 and A3 are an octave apart and each one is double/half the other, for every one cycle (up and down) of the lower one's sound wave, the higher one will make exactly two cycles, so they will line up at that point. The significance of this is that they practically sound like the same note (except one is higher) because they "line up" so nicely.

If that went over your head, I can explain it better. Either that or you can just pretend I never said anything and just understand the idea that there are twelve note names that just repeat as you go higher and higher.

Edit: Oh yeah, I forgot I planned to attach an image to help you. The following is just an illustration of sine waves.

And they're not drawn exactly, but if you look at the bottom two waves, they're about an octave apart. Notice how for every peak or dip of the blue wave, there are two peaks (or dips) in the same amount of time. Here's a decent visual of that:

Ignore the blue one, just look at the purple ones. These are an octave apart because the one makes two cycles for every one cycle of the other. Notice where the three waves intersect and how many cycles the two purple ones go through before they intersect.

A fifth is still harmonious, but not quite like an octave:

Notice how it takes twice as long for the waves to line up?

Alright, I'll stop there. I can clarify anything if you need me to.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Apr 20, 2011,