#1
I've been doing pretty intensive technique building recently and there's one thing none of my exercises cover... vertical movement. I've been doing all sorts of scales, scale patterns, Spider and its variants, the Petrucci one where you outline the major chord shape with string skips, but nothing takes me from fret 1 to fret 15. I want something that forces my fretting hand to "snap" into position. Anyone have any good ones? Thanks!
#2
Best thing to do imo is to write a crazy solo that does what you want it to do. That way, you'll be forced to keep on top of it as you'll be playing it in a song with your band (if you have a band). I'll be honest though, you're very rarely going to need to snap into position from fret 1 to fret 15. You'd normally do a run to get up the neck from point A to point B.
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#3
What I did when practicing that was play a scale completely on one string, skipping octaves on each note and only using one finger.

So all on the e string using only index finger play the frets:

0-14-4-17-7-21-11-24

do it on all strings with all 4 fingers and that really helped me really quickly. (like seeing drastic improvement in an hour)
#5
1 - make up your own as mentioned above is a good way.
2 - take your cross string variants and practice them up and down a single string... so instead of moving to the next string, move up a fret or 2.
the position change combined with a non-repetitive finger sequence is really good neck movement exercise.
3 - Learn just about any Steve Vai solo.
4 - Learn some wind instrument solos that force you up/down the neck - that helped my position changing a lot.
#6
Here's a few things I've mucked around with that should give you plenty of ideas

This is a "braid" run....at least that's what I've heard them called. In all honesty this might be a little too straightforward for you but it's a good starting point.


e|--15-12-----12--------------------------------------------------------------------
B|--------15----15-12--15-12-----12-------------------------------------------------
G|---------------------------14-----14-12----14-12-----12---------------------------
D|-------------------------------------------------14-----14-12---14-12----12-------
A|----------------------------------------------------------------------14----14-12-
E|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------


...it's easy enough to modify the basic idea to suit your needs.

Sliding run in Em pentatonic


E|---------------------------------------------17-20s22-
B|------------------------------------15-17s20----------
G|----------------------------12-14s17------------------
D|-------------------10-12s14---------------------------
A|-----------7-10s12------------------------------------
E|---5-8s10---------------------------------------------


Again easy enough to adapt.

Descending diatonic thirds in E minor, basically all you're doing is playing the middle 2 notes of each chord in the key.



e|---------------------------------------------------------
B|---------------------------------------------------------
G|----12s11--11s9-----9s7----7s5----5s4----4s2----2s0-----
D|-14------12------10------9------7------5------4------2---
A|---------------------------------------------------------
E|---------------------------------------------------------


I know the first one doesn't really shift but it should be easy enough to combine ideas and, for example, construct yourself a braid run that moves up the fretboard.
Actually called Mark!

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#7
I might have misread the question, but have you tried this one?

<code>
E -1-2-3-4--2-3-4-5--3-4-5-6--4-5-6-7--5-6-7-8-</code>

You use one finger per fret, starting in first position (from the first fret) and play through all fingers, then move to second position and repeat.

I guess you could even move it around so that you go from the first position to the 3rd, to the 2nd to the 4th etc.

Sorry if that's already something you've done- I just find it helps with that kind of thing.
#8
All great ideas, thanks guys. I know I probably am not gonna be doing any 1-15 jumps but being able to jump from, say, C on the A string to the 10th fret C on D with no hesitation would be nice. I can do it now, but I'm not 100% confident with it. That's where I'm trying to get. I'd prefer exercises because although I haven't been using the actual program, the Guitar Speed Trainer method of doing short exercises on a bell-shaped speed curve has been working wonders for me. My last six months or so of practice has been mostly songs and solos, and I've come to the realization I need to build raw technique again. Anyways, these look good, I'm sure I can get something challenging and applicable figured out with a little creative mix-n-matchin'. Much appreciated!
#9
Learn songs.
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