#1
I am going to change my gtr pickups I have the soldering iron, 60/40 rosin core solder, and [de]soldering pump (the "solder sucker")... here's how I think it should work: heat the pots where the pickups are wired to in-order to melt the solder (i know to be careful not to 'burn' the solder, just melt it enough) then 'suck' the solder(now melted at this point) just before removing the soldering iron,

but its been suggested to use some desoldering braid....to melt on TOP of the excisting solder??? -This is where I am confused.

where am i mistaken here?

Edit: this is my 1st time soldering btw
Yeah. But the same can be said for DAR amps and other amps which use "weird" tubes...dammit I want a pair of KT120s..I might blow up my amp and burn my house down, but at least I'll go out in a blaze of glory
#2
Solder braid sort of "sucks up" the solder as you melt it; I find it's much more useful than the soldering pump - mostly for the bigger solder blobs like on the back of the volume pot.

Practice a few times on something else, as heating pots too much with a soldering iron (happens a lot with beginners) can burn them into uselessness
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#3
For most guitar stuff, it's better to use the sucker to remove most of the solder, then use the braid to clean up what's left.

Using a desoldering braid is the same as soldering in reverse - heat the work, not the solder!

You put the braid on top of the solder you want to remove and heat it with the iron.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#4
The braid is generally referred to as solder wick.
I usually put the braid on top of the solder, then the iron on top of the braid.
Sometimes helps if there is a tiny amount of solder on the braid already.
I'm not saying to add any, just the first time using a spool, it may go slow.

Sometimes I will melt the solder to get it up to temp quickly then apply the solder wick as I stated above.
#5
Quote by Ratfish
Solder braid sort of "sucks up" the solder as you melt it; I find it's much more useful than the soldering pump - mostly for the bigger solder blobs like on the back of the volume pot.

Practice a few times on something else, as heating pots too much with a soldering iron (happens a lot with beginners) can burn them into uselessness


Thanks for the input, I really don't have anything else to practice on, but I suppose I could just practice on my Tone pots - I don't use the tone at all anyhow. As for using the Pump I already ordered it so I guess i'll just use that.

Now is there a need to use some kind of abrasive cloth for cleaning the unsoldered ends? or any need for crimping?
Yeah. But the same can be said for DAR amps and other amps which use "weird" tubes...dammit I want a pair of KT120s..I might blow up my amp and burn my house down, but at least I'll go out in a blaze of glory
#6
Just remember, when the desoldering wick and the pot are both hot enough for the solder to melt, that is when the desoldering wick will work. If the pot is cold and the desoldering wick is hot, won't work. If the pot is hot and the desoldering wick is cold, won't work.
#7
Great! i shall give it a shot... a nice-and-easy shot
Yeah. But the same can be said for DAR amps and other amps which use "weird" tubes...dammit I want a pair of KT120s..I might blow up my amp and burn my house down, but at least I'll go out in a blaze of glory
#8
If you are soldering pots, its good to do the following:
Tin the wires
Tin the pot lugs (cleaning below)
wrap the wire through and around the holes in the lugs then solder.


For cleaning up unsoldered terminals, a pencil eraser works quite well.

Some soldering info:
http://www.geofex.com/article_folders/how_to_solder.htm
http://beavisaudio.com/techpages/How-to-solder/
Last edited by CodeMonk at Apr 19, 2011,
#10
By far, I prefer solder wick to the pump. I've observed the way some people solder and desolder when working on electronics, and it sometimes appalls me because I work with the care of a surgeon when im in an amp. Especially when im desoldering. Some of these guys will yank on a wire like nobody's business to remove it from the solder joint. The wick is mechanically gentler than the pump, because the pump usually has that godawful recoil when it engages, and I've ruined quite a few solder pads that way.

One tool isn't necessarily better than the other, it's all about what is comfortable for you and helps you get the job done cleanly and efficiently. I get harped on for using a 30 Watt soldering iron because people think it's "too hot" but truthfully I've caused far more damage with a 15 watt iron than with a 30 watt iron. I prefer to have a hotter iron which has to stay on point for less time before the solder melts.

For most amp work, I also prefer the flat, blunt tips that come stock on some Weller irons than the sharper, pointy tips. They just work better for me. There is a greater surface to transfer heat, so the joint heats more quickly.
Tastes like chicken, if chicken was a candy.
#11
Quote by samhell

I have one of those. Works quite well. And no recoil.

Quote by ConfederateAxe
By far, I prefer solder wick to the pump. I've observed the way some people solder and desolder when working on electronics, and it sometimes appalls me because I work with the care of a surgeon when im in an amp. Especially when im desoldering. Some of these guys will yank on a wire like nobody's business to remove it from the solder joint. The wick is mechanically gentler than the pump, because the pump usually has that godawful recoil when it engages, and I've ruined quite a few solder pads that way.

One tool isn't necessarily better than the other, it's all about what is comfortable for you and helps you get the job done cleanly and efficiently. I get harped on for using a 30 Watt soldering iron because people think it's "too hot" but truthfully I've caused far more damage with a 15 watt iron than with a 30 watt iron. I prefer to have a hotter iron which has to stay on point for less time before the solder melts.

For most amp work, I also prefer the flat, blunt tips that come stock on some Weller irons than the sharper, pointy tips. They just work better for me. There is a greater surface to transfer heat, so the joint heats more quickly.


I use a 45 watt iron, or maybe its 60, I forget.
Way better than those 15 watt irons. Especially when you come across a big ground plane.

And different tips for different jobs. Use the appropriate one.
I use the blunt tips when I make cables, or deal with something with large ground planes.
I use the smaller ones for soldering components on a PCB.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Apr 20, 2011,
#12
Yeah they can argue with my iron wattage, but they can't argue with my bitchin' clean solder joints.
Tastes like chicken, if chicken was a candy.
#13
Quote by ConfederateAxe
Yeah they can argue with my iron wattage, but they can't argue with my bitchin' clean solder joints.


Then tell them a NASA certified solder'er (?) said you are doing it right.
Okay, so my cert was from around 1987 or so
#14
Epic!

I was talking with a retired NASA database employee the other day and he said the way they do things has changed very little in the past 30 years, so I think your cert is still valid.
Tastes like chicken, if chicken was a candy.
#15
Quote by CodeMonk
I have one of those. Works quite well. And no recoil.


Also, works one handed leaving the other hand to hold wires, pliers, etc. You can also vary the amount of suction.


Quote by CodeMonk
I use a 45 watt iron, or maybe its 60, I forget.
Way better than those 15 watt irons. Especially when you come across a big ground plane.

And different tips for different jobs. Use the appropriate one.
I use the blunt tips when I make cables, or deal with something with large ground planes.
I use the smaller ones for soldering components on a PCB.


Agreed. I have a variable power soldering station and always use the hottest or next to hottest setting. With lower power, you hold the iron to the piece and it takes too long to melt the solder (doubly so for that lead free crap) and ends up cooking your parts. I've wasted too many FETs and whatnot and who knows how many resisters have had their values changed by the heat.... I said F it and got a real soldering station and use real heat with appropriate tips and haven't had any issues since.