#1
I just finished school at the end of 2010 and for my woodwork major work for my HSC (It's an Australian school thing, incase anyone that isn't from Aus was wondering ) i made my own version of a Gibson Tribal Explorer with a neck that i bought, since i didn't have the time or know-how to make a neck to go with it.

I started around the beginning of December in 2009 and finished in August in 2010, and I've used it at a few gigs since and it sounds great

The body is made out of 2 solid pieces of Mahogany which i used a tongue and groove joint for (as shown in pics below) and the tribal design I painstakingly did as inlays with African Wenge.

I made a few slight changes to the measurement of the body, the main one being the top horn, because the top horn on the measurements of the Explorer plan i didn't accommodate the inlay design i had drawn up.

I also chamfered the left side of the body where your arm is when your playing it, and near the neck joint to make it a bit easier to play at the higher frets

Here's a few pictures to look at if anyone's interested


Gibson Tribal Explorer:



My Explorer:







#3
Woah that's nice, need moar pics though. I wanted to do a guitar build for my major project in Design Tech but never got to.
#4
jackson neck?
Quote by valterra
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....What are they teaching you kids in school these days?!
#5
Quote by Lightbluemk2
Nice! Is the design stuck on/inlaid?


The tribal design i did as inlays. Oh the hours that were put into routing/chiselling the design into the body and then cutting the shapes out in the Wenge, twas painful but worth it in the end
#6
Quote by matt154
Woah that's nice, need moar pics though. I wanted to do a guitar build for my major project in Design Tech but never got to.


Thanks man, I uploaded at least 100 or so photos of my Explorer to my facebook account along the way while i was working on it, so this link should let anyone see all the photos without me having to embed them all into here
http://www.facebook.com/media/set/fbx/?set=a.179609353092.126383.709868092&l=68c49aef8d
#8
Quote by distortion896
jackson neck?

Although it highly resembles a Jackson neck, it's not. I bought it from someone on eBay and i think it's an Australian company that made it, JPV or something like that. You can't see it in the photo but the headstock isn't branded with any company name or logo
#9
Quote by Levi79
Can't say I'm a fan of the tribal graphics, but you definitely did a sick job on the guitar. Looks amazing dude and I bet it plays even better.

Thanks man, yeah it plays really well and sounds great with '78 Les Paul pickups in it
#10
Why did you opt for the tongue 'n' groove method of gluing the body blanks together? Two square planed edges alone would've worked.
#11
Quote by lostcreation333
Why did you opt for the tongue 'n' groove method of gluing the body blanks together? Two square planed edges alone would've worked.

I did this because i needed to route a channel between the two pickups routes to get the pickup wire through, so i did this on the inside side of one of the two halves (as can be seen in the photo). Usually this channel is routed from the top of the guitar body and then covered with the pickguard but since i wasn't going to have one i saw this as the only way to get this route on the inside of the body. Plus the tongue and groove is a much stronger joint, so it was a win-win
#12
thats ****in sweet man, good shit
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#13
Quote by DrRuckingFetard
I did this because i needed to route a channel between the two pickups routes to get the pickup wire through, so i did this on the inside side of one of the two halves (as can be seen in the photo). Usually this channel is routed from the top of the guitar body and then covered with the pickguard but since i wasn't going to have one i saw this as the only way to get this route on the inside of the body. Plus the tongue and groove is a much stronger joint, so it was a win-win


well not really. its normally drilled from teh neck pocket to the bridge pickup. then from the bridge pickup to the control cavity.
#14
^On most custom Explorers (such as your own), yeah... But Gibson's rout is like he described, as seen here.
#15
Before I had any clue what the tongue and groove method, I thought you were going to have some sorta secret compartment where you could rip out a mandolin or something. I was pumped. Nice guitar though.
#17
Quote by Explorerbuilder
well not really. its normally drilled from teh neck pocket to the bridge pickup. then from the bridge pickup to the control cavity.

Well the other main reason as to why i did the whole tongue and groove joint was because since i made this guitar for school as my major work, the people that marked our work mark heavily on joints and how well they are done, and since everyone else made cabinets/entertainment units for their major work (which obviously use several types of joints) and i chose to make a guitar, i needed to put some kind of joint in somewhere, rather than just sticking two pieces of wood together.

As for the pickup wire cavity, what i did was just as simple as drilling down the body like you said, so i don't really see the difference.