#1
That's probably a very silly question, but I just can't understand it.

We know there are several guitar tunings that usually change the chords structure. Like "See you soon" of Coldplay the tuning is EGDDBd and most of the chords have this structure: x20020 so the zeros are actually the same note.

I understand why some musicians use Drop D tuning or one-step down, but I can't understand these "weird" tunings.

Does anyone know if there is a theory to explain the "See you soon" tuning? I mean, if you were writing a song what would make you change the tuning?
#2
well i know sometimes i wanna drone out some notes that arent in standard tuning

ir would make playing something you wrote easier

but sometimes its just fun to tune your guitar differently and play diferent voicings of chords

also i forgot to mention open tunings
which let you strum a chord just by barring all the strings
Last edited by supersac at Apr 20, 2011,
#3
So the chord you mention would be: A D D C d?

I have no idea how they come up with that tuning in the first place, maybe they were just messing around and found it?

If played on (especially acoustic) guitar, strings that are the same note will resonate together and create a fuller tone. For the same reason some keyboard instruments (piano etc.) have several strings used for each key you press.

So that chord would sound different than, say, just "A D C" which could be: "x 0 0 5 x x" in standard tuning.
#4
For weird tunings like that, it's probably just random. I sometimes just randomize my tuning as well.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#5
idk what the tuning sounds like but i think ima try it out some time lol
Ima Dude Dressed Like Another Dude Playing As Another Dude
#6
Keith Richards made a Career out of open tunings.
dngrsdave

Heavy Metal Thunder
#7
Quote by dngrsdave
Keith Richards made a Career out of open tunings.

True, but open tunings aren't really that obscure compared to the tuning in the OP.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#8
THANKS FOR ANSWERING, GUYS!

I used to think Coldplay songs were pretty simple to play but Chris Martin makes some crazy tunings on his acoustic guitar. "Til Kingdom Come" tuning is CACGBE and the chords have almost the same structure as in "See You Soon", x30050

Quote by chainsawguitar

If played on (especially acoustic) guitar, strings that are the same note will resonate together and create a fuller tone. For the same reason some keyboard instruments (piano etc.) have several strings used for each key you press.

Yeah! He also plays the piano, so maybe that's how he created that tuning.
#9
Quote by Junior#1
True, but open tunings aren't really that obscure compared to the tuning in the OP.


The tuning in TS's post is simply an open Em7 tuning. Sure it's not commonplace, but there's no reason why you can't have an open minor 7 chord rather than a straight major or minor.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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