#1
Okay, so I'm now in three bands, all of which are/are planning on becoming fully functioning bands which will be playing two 45 minute sets per gig and getting paid a nice amount (definitely no complaints on that part!), but, last week I played 2 gigs in two days with one of said bands, and I have a rather busy month coming up (that's without this third band's potential gigs whom I joined tonight after jamming with them and knowing most of their set as it is).

Anyway, those two gigs took it out of me quite badly, I was so tired the following two days (it didn't help that I went around a couple of surrounding towns the following sunday to get more gigs), but that was only two gigs with one band.
Being part of three bands (luckily the drummer is in all three bands with me and the rhythm guitarist is part of two of the bands meaning no overlaps) this means that I could potentially have a few weekends completely filled with gigs (assuming that no venue would ever book a band in the week unless it was a wedding/corporate do) with each different band.

I know that there are a few guys round here who have seen/are still within the regular gigging scene, so I ask, are there any things you do which ensure you can keep stamina over that period of time where you're constantly gigging?
I worry that I'll be fighting fit on the first gig, putting all my presence and energy into the set, then by the last gig I'd be half dead sitting on my amp (I guess if the last gig was for the band I play bass in I could get away with this! ).

Bear in mind I'm a very clean individual and I already have quite a healthy lifestyle (meaning simply getting healthier won't make a massive difference, and I won't take speed to help me through! )

Any tips would be great!
Cheers.
#4
Quote by rgrockr
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#5
Hi there. I regularly play 3 - 4 hour gigs (weekly - fortnightly), and do the occasional 2 gigs in a day thing. I always make sure that I have a big meal beforehand because if I get hungry my timing and focus greatly suffer, and I start to get the shakes. Coffee works "ok" but with the longer gigs you can sometimes get a downer (same goes for beer) and you're better off with keeping a lemonade or fizzy drink close by on stage to get random sips in here and there to keep up a slower, staggered sugar boost for the longer gigs.

If you're tired before the gig has even started, best way to rectify is by eating an apple. Yes an apple. It obviously healthy, but has a slow release of fructose which can keep you going for a pretty long time (works for uni essays too).

Hmm, what else. If you can, have a rest break before the gig if you're coming from work, and arrive nice and early at the venue to set up your gear and have a decent 10mins+ to just chill before you start. Moving gear around can get your heart beat up a bit and can take you a while to calm down again.

I think that's about it.
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#6
pretty much what alan said

I've had three four hour gigs in one week last year, and was unable to take time out of work for them, so I'd get up at six in the AM andwork till four (yeah I had a crap job at the time that required me to work at least 55hrs, 5 ten hour days and a five hour day), then run home change, grab my crap, and haul ass to where we needed to be by six so we could start at seven and play till eleven.....

I would keep two energy drinks off to the side on a little table that we hid with a couple of speakers, and when I would have the need I would drink some...

also the apple has a couple of natural chemicals that they use in the creation of some energy drinks, they are energy chemicals that act as the chemicals your body produces during sleep...

water is good, since dehydration is the biggest reason people feel groggy....

also protein is good for energy and non-simple carbs as well, things that aren't sugar or white bread or white rice, all of those things are more quick burst. of course most of us don't have the time to think that much about what we are eating.

also I know you said your in pretty good shape but exercise does help build stamina. just working out and walking will help you build that, if you have time. as you burn fat and build muscles your body release endorphins that pump you up...

honestly any of these things, or in the best case all of these things, will help. unfortunately I don't know how much time there is in your schedule to fit much of it in. so just remember don't go on stage hungry or thirsty, those are ingrediants for disaster. good luck brotha!
Quote by Dirk Gently
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#7
Cheers guys, great help!

I'm hoping to avoid any sort of "artificial" ways to stay pumped for it (being energy drinks and stuff) but everything else is solid advice here!

In terms of working out, I think Stryker125 made a good suggestion, I work my abs, chest and arms a fair bit, but I do need to do more cardio.

The apple thing is new to me! But it's sounding good! I'll definitely remember that.

Cheers guys!
#8
If you don't want to do energy drinks of coffee you could always try tea. Tea has just a little bit of caffeine to keep you energized and will also help your voice if you're singing.

It also depends what kind of music you're playing. If you're headbanging and thrashing on stage you'll obviously get more tired than if you're playing country covers
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#9
Quote by QuantumMechanix
If you don't want to do energy drinks of coffee you could always try tea. Tea has just a little bit of caffeine to keep you energized and will also help your voice if you're singing.

It also depends what kind of music you're playing. If you're headbanging and thrashing on stage you'll obviously get more tired than if you're playing country covers


I drink a fair bit of tea as it is (I am doing backing vocals, but only for one of the bands) so I think that's been covered well.

And the stuff I do, one of the bands is sort of alternative/modern rock covers, one is two-tone and reggae and the other is in a bit of a transitional period but there's a high chance it'll be 3rd wave ska, so two of the bands have a fair amount of energy in them!
#11
Hah great advice, though when I gig I neither attract any, or really aim to get any ass!
These gigs are more like serious money making endeavours, also our clientèle aren't exactly hot girls!
#12
Great thread. Great answers. I need them too.
Best advice is to eat a full meal that day. Always have water at hand. I have a snack saved for after.
The thing that helps me if I'm really exhausted is a great song - a song that you really love and means a lot to you. Remember why you love it so much when you play it. It will boost your energy for the next couple of songs. You can get through by music alone if you can get that awesome feeling out.
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#13
I sometimes have gigs twice a day, and a steady one on tuesday, thursday, and saturday. at first, I thought I would die, but to be completely honest, try to get into meditation. If you do it wrong and don't believe in it, it obviously does notthing.

if you do it right, you can sleep extreemley easily, and be awake and able the next day(and you know that after a gig, its sometimes very hard to sleep with the adrenaline). Meditiation has nothing to do with religion, more with getting in touch with your inner self, finding the quiet place, and basically just focussing on nothingness for a while. It also seems to stop the ringing after a loud gig.
#14
I think you are going to be fine so long as you look after yourself. Get into reading the running books/magazines for training regimes and advice on general fitness. Basically if you eat sensibly and do some cardio and make sure you sleep well you'll be fine. Don't over exercise the day before a gig as you'll deplete your glycogen (energy) reserves and may create other problems. Don't eat a big meal too close to a gig as your energy will be diverted to the task of digestion. Bananas are generally the fruit to eat, you'll see the tennis players eating them mid game, as they are slower release than apples. Avoid huge hits of sugar or any stimulants like caffeine as they can cause a rebound effect and definitely avoid depressants like alcohol until after the show. Get good sleep!!!!

As a fellow bassist your hands and forearms are going to ache from time to time due to lactic acid. Stretching exercises before and after will help and vigorous massage straight after a gig will improve fluid flow and remove some of the lactic acid. Try to keep your arms and thumb on your fetting hand relaxed. You could try icing your arms at the end of the gig (immersing them in ice cold water for 20 mins, which is what long distance athletes do with their legs) but I've not tried this.

Good luck
#15
Jrakus, good advice! But the "song you love" thing is a bit wasted for two of the bands, one of them is a "only in it to get a bit of cash" alt rock covers band (so stuff like Kings of Leon, Arctic Monkeys, The Killers etc. etc.) of which I dislike most of the setlist. The one I play bass for is a two-tone/reggae band, which is all good and fun, but none of the music really fires me up. The other's in a bit of a transitional period, with the potential to be a generic wedding band, or possibly a third wave ska band (bit of a weird place to be at!) now if that turns 3rd wave, I could probably get pumped for some of that!

Willwelsh816, thanks, I'll have to try meditation to see how I go with it!

Phil Starr, thanks for the tips, and that bass stuff is well needed, I'm not exactly experienced as a bassist (I was drafted into this band because they knew I was experienced with guitar and that I dabble with bass), I do stuff similar to that already (except for the ice water!) but it's good to know I need to focus on it!
#16
Quote by QuantumMechanix
If you don't want to do energy drinks of coffee you could always try tea. Tea has just a little bit of caffeine to keep you energized and will also help your voice if you're singing.

It also depends what kind of music you're playing. If you're headbanging and thrashing on stage you'll obviously get more tired than if you're playing country covers

sorry I hate to be a buzz kill, but the "fact" that tea has less caffine than coffee is a myth.... they have roughly the same amount of caffine. unfortunately this myth has been considered a fact for so long that many respected people still treat it as fact.

also kind of on the topic, caffine also does not dehydrate you like anotyher common myth states. it just doesn't hydrate you as much as other things like water...
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#17
Yeah, well even with the tea thing (never sure what the levels of caffeine of things are, but caffeine isn't much of a worry, just don't want to hype myself on energy drinks like a lot of people do!) I'd have like a cup before I leave for the gig to keep my throat nice and stuff.

Whenever I gig it's always a case of me drinking water whenever I'm there!
#18
As has been said, the best way to build up your stamina is to do a ton of cardio work. Be it running, jogging, walking, swimming, biking, or what have you, cardio is literally about the only way to increase your stamina.
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#19
Quote by krypticguitar87
sorry I hate to be a buzz kill, but the "fact" that tea has less caffine than coffee is a myth.... they have roughly the same amount of caffine. unfortunately this myth has been considered a fact for so long that many respected people still treat it as fact.

also kind of on the topic, caffine also does not dehydrate you like anotyher common myth states. it just doesn't hydrate you as much as other things like water...



Caffiene is a diuretic though, i.e., makes you pee. So in a way, it dehydrates you.

I have no extreme gigging experience, but have played even short sets on either little to no food or in a bad mood, and it definitely takes a toll. So, don't do that

I like this advice though, as it looks like my band is both picking up more gigs and we'll be playing a double header in the summer.
#20
Quote by Punk_Ninja
Yeah, well even with the tea thing (never sure what the levels of caffeine of things are, but caffeine isn't much of a worry, just don't want to hype myself on energy drinks like a lot of people do!) I'd have like a cup before I leave for the gig to keep my throat nice and stuff.

Whenever I gig it's always a case of me drinking water whenever I'm there!


well the steam from tea is good for relaxing the muscles in your throat which in turn makes it better for singing.

also if you are singing water is the best thing, for best results it should be room tempurature while singing, because extreame temperature changes are bad for your voice. also carbonated beverages lead to belching, which can be a hassle for a vocalist .

out of curiostiy, how much do you, personally, sweat when you are on stage, because gatorade or power ade or some other sports drink could also be quite helpful. you loose salt, along with the water, from your body when you sweat so only replacing the water dilutes your blood and other fluids, which can also cause problems...

Quote by JDizzle787
Caffiene is a diuretic though, i.e., makes you pee. So in a way, it dehydrates you.


yeah thats true, I was just making a point that drinking something with caffine is still better than drinking nothing. where alot of people treat it as "never drink soda or coffee if you are dehydrating" which is just not nessecarily true, it's just recommended to drink water or juice if thats an option. however if you were someplace where all you have is coffee or soda, it will still help....
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#21
Quote by krypticguitar87
out of curiostiy, how much do you, personally, sweat when you are on stage, because gatorade or power ade or some other sports drink could also be quite helpful. you loose salt, along with the water, from your body when you sweat so only replacing the water dilutes your blood and other fluids, which can also cause problems...


I don't sweat an awful lot.
After a half hour set with a proper lighting rig I'm sweating a little bit and after a 50 minute set with no real lighting to heat me up I'm fairly cool but a bit damp.

The rhythm guitarist for the band I play bass for sweats like mad though, so I might have to suggest him a sports drink!
#22
Quote by Punk_Ninja
I don't sweat an awful lot.
After a half hour set with a proper lighting rig I'm sweating a little bit and after a 50 minute set with no real lighting to heat me up I'm fairly cool but a bit damp.

The rhythm guitarist for the band I play bass for sweats like mad though, so I might have to suggest him a sports drink!

for sure I know that for longer gigs I tend to need one (I usually play rhythm guitar)
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.