#1
I have an Epiphone 210 Fat Strat (piece of shit) that I want to fix up.

When it's plugged in and the amp is on, there is buzzing. So, there is clearly some electrical problem (by checking the cable and amp with another guitar, I know it is the Epiphone). But, the buzzing significantly reduces if I have any human contact with the metal parts on the guitar, especially by the output jack. So, I want the buzzing to stop... but I don't wanna sit there with my finger on the output jack while I am attempt to play!! Any suggestions for how to fix this? Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for reading!!!
#2
One of the grounds is loose inside the guitar. Probably on the output jack. There should be two wires connected to the jack (most likely white and black)

It's a simple solder job, if you don't know how to solder I suggest buying an iron ($15) and teach yourself. It's a simple skill that every guitar player should know.


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#3
Alright, thank you for the input. I checked the wiring under the pickguard and at the output jack, but everything seems to be in place pretty well. Is there a way to determine which ones I should re-solder?
#4
How bad is the buzzing? A slight buzz when your not touching any metal on the guitar is normal, cause passive pickups ground through your body, so I ask this cause people think that humbuckers shouldn't ever make any buzzing whatsoever might mistake it for a problem when it's actually not.

If it's a very slight buzz, and doesn't affect your playing, then don't worry about it, but if it's as loud as when you are playing, then it's a loose ground.
#5


if it's not the jack,
the cable, the ground in the trem cavity,
the amp,
a dimmer light, a computer running nearby,
the pup selector switch, or your house's outlet.

then connect an alligator clip to your bridge,
connect the other end to a loop of wire and tuck it in your pants.
and you can play in silence.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

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#6
Quote by jj1565


if it's not the jack,
the cable, the ground in the trem cavity,
the amp,
a dimmer light, a computer running nearby,
the pup selector switch, or your house's outlet.

then connect an alligator clip to your bridge,
connect the other end to a loop of wire and tuck it in your pants.
and you can play in silence.

congrats. you just won the threads first born.
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#7
Quote by Necrolysis
congrats. you just won the threads first born.




yeah i have a closet full of babies now.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#8
The grounding of most guitars is through the tailpiece or bridge, to the strings, to you fingers, so your body acts as a grounding. When the grounding wire isn't connected to the output jack (I had that problem a week ago) there is really nothing coming out of your guitar except the buzzing.

If the buzzing is way more than normal you can check for other things, like whether your amp is powered by a grounded outlet. If all of that doesn't work you can check the wiring of your guitar, make sure everything is connected properly, and check if there is no short circuiting.