#1
Hey guys,

I was wondering how many of you play the ukulele, I am off to Hawaii in a few weeks and as a huge Elvis fan I am considering buying one and learning how to play it just to get an authentic feeling when I play some of his songs.

Is it a hard instrument to play? I just get the impression it would be way easier than learning guitar, also, would my experience with the acoustic guitar make it a lot easier to understand how to play a ukulele?

any help would be appreciated.
thanks
#2
Yes I own an ukulele, but I rarely play it.

However if you can play the acoustic guitar, you can pretty much play the ukulele basics technically. But you need to learn the chords differently, because an ukulele is tuned in GCEA.
#3
I've been playin uke for a while. Not that hard to play (and there's uke tab sites out there). Chords are fairly easy. String are tuned GCEA usually.
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#4
I have one but I don't play it, guitar is just so much more interesting
#5
I live in hawaii and I play and I love my ukulele. Its easy to just transpose songs from guitar, like elvis, but if you start getting into some serious uke music (youtube- Jake Shimabukuro), it gets way harder and way different.
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#6
throw a capo on your fifth fret and you have an ukulele (more or less) I play one and its great fun,
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#7
I play Uke and I love it. The thing is, you don't necessarily have to play it in a traditional sense. If you're not familiar with her, check out Julia Nunes on youtube. I've always loved her music and the way she rocks the uke.
#8
I play ukulele, by far my least favourite instrument I play. But you can picture as a guitar with a capo on the fith but only for bottom four strings.
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#9
I love ukuleles!!!
I got one as a present once and it was all I played for weeks, leaving very expensive guitars collecting dust!
I do a great Year of the Cat - I recommend that tune (Al Stewart).
#10
excellent, thank you for the reply guys, I thought it would be similar to guitar because it basically is like you guys said, its just a tiny capo'd guitar. Well I will definitely be getting one then.

You can just tune it with a regular guitar tuner and use guitar capo's on it right?
#11
Quote by guusw
Yes I own an ukulele, but I rarely play it.

However if you can play the acoustic guitar, you can pretty much play the ukulele basics technically. But you need to learn the chords differently, because an ukulele is tuned in GCEA.


You don't really need to learn the chords differently, other than the fact that the lower two strings are missing.

Regarding the fact that it is tuned to a different key, it would be much more work to relearn the chords based on the new key. You do not have to.

When I play what is a G chord on a guitar on a ukulele (minus the bottom two strings), I still think of it as a G chord.

Of course, I know that it sounds a fourth higher, C, but I still think of it as a G chord.

The fact that it sounds a fourth higher would not make one bit of diffeence if you are playing alone. If you are singing, however, you might have to play the song in a different key than before, to be in a good range for your voice. Also, if you are playing with other instruments, you need to know the transposition, to sound in the same key as them.

Think of band instruments, like clarinet, trumpet, saxophone, etc. Most of them transpose. For instance, if one plays what one knows as the note "C" on a clarinet, trumpet, or tenor saxophone, it actually sounds like a Bb. However, the notation shows a C, and the musician thinks of it as C. The music is transposed for him. So, if the player only plays from written music, he never even has to think about the transposition. However, if he is playing in a group not solely relying on written music, with improvisation, etc., he just has to know for example, that if the band is playing in the key of G, he has to play in the key of A, in order to sound in the same key as everyone else..

In that way, a saxophonist who usually plays tenor saxophone (the note C sounds Bb), can change to an alto saxophone (the note C sounds like Eb), and the notes are exactly the same for him, same fingering for C and all the other notes. Playing from written music, the music is transposed for an Eb instrument. If not all from written music, he has to know the Ev transposition. (Band playing in G, he has to play in Bb.) Much easier than learning the note names for the finger positions all over again though.

So, really--switiching from standard guitar tuning, to an instrument using the same tuning but higher or lower (requinto or guitalele tuning--same as ukulele, but with 6 strings) (and ukes are sometimes tuned a whole step higher than regular uke tuning, with the highest note as B instead of A, you do not have to learn your chords all over again. Think of them the same as before.
#12
Quote by guusw
Yes I own an ukulele, but I rarely play it.

However if you can play the acoustic guitar, you can pretty much play the ukulele basics technically. But you need to learn the chords differently, because an ukulele is tuned in GCEA.



you can also tune BF#DA
#13
so all the chords are identical, all I have to do is just chop the bottom strings off? I just looked at the chords on ukulele-tabs.com and though they looked different at first it looks like you guys are right, they are the exact same as guitar chords which is awesome because I thought I was going to have to learn all the chords all over again.

really appreciate the help guys.