#1
Recently I've found that i'm pretty uptight about scales. It's kinda dawned on me because i always use a scale as a base for any riff, and when my bandmates come up with riffs i get annoyed if they happen to have one note out of key.

I think its because i'm grade 6 at keyboard and 3 at theory, so i know the scales and i think that i absolutely have to stick to them, like they are the foundations of music.

But the songs i've been learning (on keyboard and guitar) are making me confused about this. For example; Racer X Scarified, on the arpeggio part Paul sometimes comes out of the scale he's using and hits notes that aren't in it, and reverts back to the scale again. And on keyboards, sometimes i play a chord that wouldnt normally be used in the scale.

How can i stop being so uptight about these things?
#3
play some jazz... its all about playing the wrongs notes, kinda.
I play guitar.
#4
Even though it's technically a scale, using the chromatic scale is a great way to add flavor and twist to any basic mode or whatever scale you're playing through. I'd say just don't be completely focused on the key/scale of the song and let your fingers do the talking. Playing guitar isn't supposed to be entirely related to theory, although it does help greatly at times.
#5
Yeah always staying the scales is fine, but occasionally hitting notes not in the scale really adds flavor to get something less boring and normal. It's more important how it sounds to your ear than how it relates to music theory you learned.
#6
i dont know if you play much with more exotic scales, but they can definitely be a good break from the standard maj. min. dim. type scales. in terms of more traditional theory they have some "wrong" notes in them, but in the right context sound cool. a quick example off the top of my head is "mustereon" by joe satriani that utilizes the Hungarian minor scale. looking at pieces like this might help to blur the lines about what is "right" or not
#7
Watch Victor Wootens "Groove Workshop"... he plays a solo using all of the so called "right notes", but he lets his groove fall to crap and the solo is horrible to listen to. He also plays a solo with an amazing groove but uses all of the so called "wrong/out notes" and it sounded great.

In the workshop he talks about breaking music into 10 equal elements. Notes are only 1 of the 10. The other 9 all form "the groove". The he asks why if notes are only 10% of music do we spend 95% of our time learning only notes!?

Good question, huh!?
Quote by MetlHed94



Well played, sir, well played.
#8
You should use the scale as sort of a starting point, but you shouldn't really let it restrict you or box you in. Thats what I learned
#10
Ah ok. I've tried some of the things to try and get myslef away from restricting myself to scales and it works pretty well. Thanks for the advice
#11
Then you should lissen to fusion, you´ll get crazy.

They use chromatic notes aswell, i mean i can write riffs and i might write in e minor but i can still use chromatic notes (equals any of the 12 notes that exists) if i think that it sounds good.
#12
why don't you just imagine something and play it? play what you hear not what's in a box or scale. Scales are just tools. Anyone can buy a table saw but it doesn't mean they will make great woodwork. Scales are essentially the table saw. The best players play what "sounds" good. It doesn't matter what note it is!!

--m
www.knobtwiddler.net
#13
Non-scale tones are totally fine to use - there's nothing wrong with using them.
Luke Mosse Guitar Teacher in Bristol, UK
#14
Quote by knobtwiddler
why don't you just imagine something and play it? play what you hear not what's in a box or scale. Scales are just tools. Anyone can buy a table saw but it doesn't mean they will make great woodwork. Scales are essentially the table saw. The best players play what "sounds" good. It doesn't matter what note it is!!

--m
www.knobtwiddler.net

I agree with this.
Use your knowledge of theory to project what your vision is in your head.
#15
Try coming up with the melody in your head first, then applying it to guitar. If you do it this way, you won't be as much concerned with whether a note is in a scale or if it just sounds good in that context.
#16
Quote by no bs johnny
Try coming up with the melody in your head first, then applying it to guitar. If you do it this way, you won't be as much concerned with whether a note is in a scale or if it just sounds good in that context.

Right on