#1
So I recently joined a band with a few friends at my school and realized something. I have spent the past 4 or 5 years of my life barely improving at guitar. It's not that I can't improve, at least I think I am capable of improving, its just that the way I would learn things is I would get on here, look up a song I liked, learn the main riff, and then leave and go play it. Never learn the full song, play along with the song, learn solos, etc. So basically I am 5 years in and I can play a huge variety of classic rock/older metal riffs, and almost nothing else. I can play several Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath songs all the way through with the song, and I can figure out pretty much any punky power chord heavy rock songs by just jamming with the song. I can't play any solos though, except for the Living Loving Maid solo and I can make up short cheesy pentatonic blues solos, but I can't do much outside of the bar chord fingerings. Anyone have any song ideas? I am pretty bad at hearing how difficult a solo is other than by speed, which I am not the greatest at. I don't really want to adore the songs, I just want practice. Any electric or technical acoustic (not just strumming chords) rock songs that can help improve my speed and dexterity?
#2
I assume you have your scales down, if you kindof understand scales and keys you're set for writing your own songs, no more playing covers and stressing out coz you don't get the timing.
Quote by Tyson2011
when in doubt, adjust the truss rod.

Sfedf the First ...
or should it be the insane?
#3
Theory would definitely help immensely if you haven't grasped the basic concepts of music...

Make sure you got the basics down, tight and solid

-Chords (power,Open, barre) maj, min, min7th, maj7, dom7th
-Know the notes on fretboard
-Practice with a metronome: single note exercises and chord changes, licks, songs you know. Practice until you can feel the groove and keep playing in time with no effort
-Ear training: Transcribe anything you find interesting. pay attention to phrasing, dynamics, etc... it gets easier with time and you will spot extra stuff you couldn't before. It's a good feeling when that happens

These basic aspects would take you to a new level (in case you are lacking in them)

Basically try to understand music, instead of learning from tabs or fingerings it opens a lot of possibilities when you understand music
#4
Quote by Guitarra_acores
Theory would definitely help immensely if you haven't grasped the basic concepts of music...

Make sure you got the basics down, tight and solid

-Chords (power,Open, barre) maj, min, min7th, maj7, dom7th
-Know the notes on fretboard
-Practice with a metronome: single note exercises and chord changes, licks, songs you know. Practice until you can feel the groove and keep playing in time with no effort
-Ear training: Transcribe anything you find interesting. pay attention to phrasing, dynamics, etc... it gets easier with time and you will spot extra stuff you couldn't before. It's a good feeling when that happens

These basic aspects would take you to a new level (in case you are lacking in them)

Basically try to understand music, instead of learning from tabs or fingerings it opens a lot of possibilities when you understand music

Exactly, theory will open up a world in which your technique will flourish.
#5
I'll probably get flammed for this... so I want to start off by saying you can never know enough theory!!!

I really enjoy the way Victor Wooten talks about his experiance with music. In his book "The Music Lesson". He treats music like a language. When you learned english you learned to speak before you could read and write, music should be no diffrent.

In the book Victor splits music into 10 equal elements: Notes, Articulation, Technique, Feel, Dynamics, Rhythm, Tone, Phrasing, Space, Listening

Then Victor asks a simple question. If the notes being played are only 10% of music why do most people spend 95% of their time studying only notes!? Good question, huh?
Quote by MetlHed94



Well played, sir, well played.