#1
Hi good people of MT!

To the few here that transcribe solos and progressions, do you also transcribe rhythms? If yes, how exactly do you do it?

I usually do it measure by measure with a click of a metronome and try to figure out where the note falls within the beat, but it can be tough sometimes. Tips?
#2
By being familiar with the concept/sound of rhythms. It helps if you sightread and write out your own songs in notation.
#3
Quote by griffRG7321
By being familiar with the concept/sound of rhythms. It helps if you sightread and write out your own songs in notation.


I understand that, and I've been working on it for the past few months. I guess what I'm asking is is there a methodical way to do it? Like counting using syllables?
#4
for 16th's; 1 e and a 2 e and a 3 e and a 4 e and a
for 8ths; 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and
for regular crotchet; 1 2 3 4
for triplet 8ths; 1 and a 2 and a 3 and a 4 and a

that's all I know dude.
#5
Quote by rhys digby
for 16th's; 1 e and a 2 e and a 3 e and a 4 e and a
for 8ths; 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and
for regular crotchet; 1 2 3 4
for triplet 8ths; 1 and a 2 and a 3 and a 4 and a

that's all I know dude.

I find that for triplet 8ths, using 1 tee ta 2 tee ta.... works better. It's less confusing because those rhythms don't fall on the "and" or the "a" and could be mixed up with sixteenths accidentally
#6
I recommend learning how to write music. In a traditional sheet music kind of way. You don't have to be a master at it, but if you know how to write it changes the way you think it. I write rhythms out by the bar just like you would on a chart. Sometimes I just write the rhythms above the lines (just on one line) so I can see the rhythms. The reason for writing it out bar by bar is you want to think it like you're playing it. You want to think in the same time sig and amount of bars. In the long run this allows you to learn music quicker and play better.

Learn rhythms like a drummer. Infact you should take some drum lessons just on snare drum with a good teacher. It will help you're understanding of rhythm.

--m
www.knobtwiddler.net
#7
may i suggest you start by notating just the main beats of the solo.
i.e avoid notating embellishments,bends slides feedback and kettles whistling in the background.
also keep your transcriptions short.
4 bars can be long enough. once you have a repertoire of them say about ten, then move onto longer transcriptions .
it makes sense that you practice your transcribing with famous solos or melodies and then compare them to professionally written ones from books.

have fun!
#8
Quote by rhys digby
for 16th's; 1 e and a 2 e and a 3 e and a 4 e and a
for 8ths; 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and
for regular crotchet; 1 2 3 4
for triplet 8ths; 1 and a 2 and a 3 and a 4 and a

that's all I know dude.



Will the American English speakers and the British English speakers ever get past the quarter note <-> crochet dispute!?!?!?

I kid!

TS,

Take small bites.

Start by transcribing simpler songs .. if they are familiar, even better. Things like National Anthems and children's songs .. usually nice and obvious and you can always go check the sheet music online if you are not sure. Ditto for well known passages of Beethoven, for example. If you can hum it, it's easier to write down.

It helps a LOT to read rhythms ... there are any number of good books for this and a fair number of websites I am certain. Finale Notepad is another useful resource for testing yourself.

HTH
#10
i tap my fingers out (thumb for 1, index for 2, etc) at the quarter note and sing the rhythm as slow as i need to to get it into my head conceptually as a written rhythm.

i have a book for my courses at school called Studying Rhythm. it's actually super helpful especially as it's arranged from easiest to hardest.
#DTWD
#11
Quote by ibanez1511
is finale notepad still free ?
ive been using musescore i can highly recommend it



Oh -- good point -- it may not be free.


But any scoring software helps. I use Finale Print Music when I am working with other musicians and I don't want them to laugh at my mistakes.

I transcribed a version of Zappa's "King Kong" for a sax player and he giggled ... I had the notes and royally screwed up the rhythm ,,, hey, it's Zappa!! I'm no Steve Vai!
#12
Some of the greatest advice one of my professors gave me was that as you start to get into more complicated solos, notating exact rhythms becomes impossible, because what they are playing can't be notated in any conventional way. On the All Blues and Freddie Freeloader solos, Miles played phrases where he would rush the beat, or approach a note from a microtone away. I just kind of had to do an approximation of what he played, because our notation system has no way of indicating what he played.
I couldn't think of a thing that I hope tomorrow brings
#13
This is very true. There is no real way to write these expressions. Transcribing will help you understand what is going on... atleast in the ballpark. Then you can get deeper. That's the real meat there!! It's funny because I think in a lot of players only think of things being on time if it's perfectly on the beat. They don't study why things are ahead of the beat sometimes, or behind. Those nuances are very important. To be able to control the expression which ofcourse Miles was a master at is one of the utimate things a musician can aquire. This gets deep into feel.

Sometimes players who don't play a ot of notes get ragged on, but often they have more of a grasp on these little mico expressions.

--m
www.knobtwiddler.net


Quote by thegloaming
Some of the greatest advice one of my professors gave me was that as you start to get into more complicated solos, notating exact rhythms becomes impossible, because what they are playing can't be notated in any conventional way. On the All Blues and Freddie Freeloader solos, Miles played phrases where he would rush the beat, or approach a note from a microtone away. I just kind of had to do an approximation of what he played, because our notation system has no way of indicating what he played.
#14
Thanks for all the input guys!

knobtwiddler, your 2 posts have been very helpful to me. Thanks!