#1
Hey guys,

I've never been in here before, I wasn't completely sure where to post it but here we are, I hope it's in the right pace.

I play guitar, pretty well know, I guess around 4 years. I tend to focus on singing and lyrics nowadays, when I listen to music, compared to the guitar in the songs.

So, I've always wanted to be able to sing, but sadly it's not something that comes naturally for me.

My question is, is it possible to learn how to sing in tune? Like, at the moment, I can't really hit any notes (apart from some, but I'll come to that in a bit), but I can hear when I'm not hitting them correctly.

This song here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TO6pI4138nU obviously very difficult to sing, but I can (I think - 90% sure) hit the notes before he goes "Where is your soul?"

This is what's made me want to sing even more, I know I can do it, it just doesn't come easily. I've tried to sing to notes on a keyboard, and I can hit some, but not most of them.

And I'm not even sure if I am hitting them properly. The notes sound right to me, but I don't know if they actually are? It's hard to explain...

I'm much more comfortable singing high than anything else, I feel I can hit some notes high, but generally not really any lower.

So, any tips? What should I do to train my ear to make sure I can hit notes properly? Is it even possible for me to teach my voice to sing in tune, or should I give up?
Wait.



Roger Waters - 12th May!
#2
Try getting vocal lessons, sing in the shower, practice and your vocals will posibly get better, and try harmonizing your voice with notes on the keyboard, if you hear any wavyness (make sure there isn't any other noises first) then your not hitting the note
#3
It's absolutely possible. You should have relative pitch by now, which is really the key thing in learning how to sing. I would recommend getting a singing tutor, at least for a couple lessons, to learn how to do it properly (breathing from the diaphragm, optimal posture, etc.).

As far as learning pitch, I learned by playing a note on a piano, say middle C, and singing that note until I got just right. Then I'd move on to D, and so on.

The key is to keep practicing, but in limited doses (limiting vocal strain--the time you can practice will increase over time).
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Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
try the sexolydian scale.
#4
Try to record your own singing and see how your voice sound like (after a couple of years in music school I can hit notes without a problem but my voice just sounds like sh*t).
That way you'll know whether you're just not able to hit the notes or if you're just a crappy singer (no offence).
If you just can't hit the notes properly try by singing scales while playing them along on a piano (a guitar will work as well but in my experience a piano does the trick best). Record the scales you're singing and listen closely if you hit them correctly. Once you've mastered that, start singing simple melodies.

The reason you feel more comfy singing highter notes is just because you've got a higher-pitched singing voice. If you can't hit the low notes, just try to sing it in a different key (play other chords or just use a capo). That way, you'll also learn what your range is.

Other than that, it's just practice, practice, practice...

Oh, and don't force your voice. If your throut aches after you've been singing, you've got the wrong technique, try singing from your stumach, otherwise you'll break your voice, and you really don't want that to happen. I know a lot of singers (such as Kurt Cobain) had wring techniques, and sometimes it sound great, but in most cases, it doesn't.

Hope that helps.

Grtz,
Megendrio
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#5
Quote by Megendrio
Try to record your own singing and see how your voice sound like (after a couple of years in music school I can hit notes without a problem but my voice just sounds like sh*t).
That way you'll know whether you're just not able to hit the notes or if you're just a crappy singer (no offence).
If you just can't hit the notes properly try by singing scales while playing them along on a piano (a guitar will work as well but in my experience a piano does the trick best). Record the scales you're singing and listen closely if you hit them correctly. Once you've mastered that, start singing simple melodies.

The reason you feel more comfy singing highter notes is just because you've got a higher-pitched singing voice. If you can't hit the low notes, just try to sing it in a different key (play other chords or just use a capo). That way, you'll also learn what your range is.

Other than that, it's just practice, practice, practice...

Oh, and don't force your voice. If your throut aches after you've been singing, you've got the wrong technique, try singing from your stumach, otherwise you'll break your voice, and you really don't want that to happen. I know a lot of singers (such as Kurt Cobain) had wring techniques, and sometimes it sound great, but in most cases, it doesn't.

Hope that helps.

Grtz,
Megendrio


Yeah, I just did record my voice. It's odd, because in my head, it sounds perfectly in tune, whereas on the recorded version, it doesn't. I don't know how it's possible to fix that, if possible at all?
Wait.



Roger Waters - 12th May!