#1
So for the last few months, I have been working on bettering my chest voice.

Slowly my range has been building and I have gotten to a highpoint of F4. On the way to this note, I've started to notice that to use this note half the time my voice adds an overbearing rasp/growl to the note.

I have been pondering what causes this, but I'm not sure what would really cause a rasp that doesn't hurt at all and hasn't injured me in the 2 or so weeks of daily practice.

Maybe I'm just using too much air, or it could be the false chords coming into play. I could be pulling chest. Maybe my technique is horrible and this rasp is protecting my voice. I don't really know, Any help?
#2
yea that means that the note is actually too high for you or you aren't pushing through your diaphram to project so your straining your voice to hit that F
#3
My voice also has a natural rasp when I start to hit higher notes. I think it may be a bit of unintentional vocal fry. If you mess with your voice and keep practicing, you should find that you're able to control it. I can more or less turn the raspiness on and off. It's just frustrating because sometimes there'll be a note or two where I just can't seem to get all the raspiness to go away.

Anyway, if it's not hurting you then you should be okay. Just keep experimenting with it and you should be able to turn it on/off depending on how you want to sound.
#4
Haha I wish I had this problem! If I ever want rasp I have to close my throat...which is obviously not good for the chords.
#5
Don't kid yourself into thinking that two weeks is enough time to tell whether you are damaging your voice.

Also... if you were to sing for, say, two hours.... would you still be able to hit that note? Would the rasp be worse? If things get worse and not better, then *that* is an indication that you are damaging your voice.

A rasp does not protect your voice. It is usually a sign that you're not doing something correctly. It is also usually a sign that the note is too high for you.

Chances are, though, that if you can hit that note without any training, that if you actually learned some technique, then you could hit the note cleanly and not do any damage. Learning technique removes the barriers that prevent you from hitting the notes you should be able to hit.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
Quote by Jacobrivers8
yea that means that ... you aren't pushing through your diaphram to project so your straining your voice to hit that F


This is probably the second most popular piece of bad advice (maybe the first... right up there with "drop your jaw") for singing. As soon as you are pushing *anything* you are doing something wrong.

Section 4 - the hold of the breath - http://thebelcantotechnique.now-here-this.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=33&Itemid=35

#3 - "Push with the diaphragm" - http://thebelcantotechnique.now-here-this.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=32&Itemid=34

Top half of the page - http://www.brianvollmer.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=1&Itemid=50&limitstart=3

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Thanks for the replies.

Usually when I start my practice, the rasp isn't really there. After an hour or so it becomes more prevalent. I have also started to notice that the rasp almost isn't there whenever I use the O vowel on the F. It feels more like I am transitioning into a head voice tone. Pulling chest might be my problem.

Good enough time as any to work on cleaning up my technique, though.

Yeah, the rasp is very nice whenever I do more "angry" type songs.

Last question, what would be a good exercise to work on that area? I've heard of the witch's cackle, and I'll try and sue that more. Anything else?
#9
Quote by Mattofla
Thanks for the replies.

Usually when I start my practice, the rasp isn't really there. After an hour or so it becomes more prevalent. I have also started to notice that the rasp almost isn't there whenever I use the O vowel on the F. It feels more like I am transitioning into a head voice tone. Pulling chest might be my problem.

Good enough time as any to work on cleaning up my technique, though.

Yeah, the rasp is very nice whenever I do more "angry" type songs.

Last question, what would be a good exercise to work on that area? I've heard of the witch's cackle, and I'll try and sue that more. Anything else?


Here's an even better piece of advice: do one thing at a time. You brain can't juggle everything at once and make it sound nice. Honestly, it's best to be thinking as little as possible when you're singing. Even the witch's cackle is a good thing to get you feeling in the right place, but the more you start thinking about it, the quicker it falls apart. Good singing doesn't happen in the cortex, it happens deeper (accurately, it happens in the basal ganglia )
#10
Yeah.. I tend to try and do many things at one time when i am really in a mindset to improve something.

So yesterday during my practice, I tried looking through a couple of Rockthestagenyc videos and some Singing success stuff. It was mainly basic low larynx exercises like buh and muh.(I had neglected those warmups in the past.) After doing those types of warmups for awhile I found a really interesting area. It felt like I was singing purely from my forehead and to me it had sort of a Geoff Tate sound, except it was around the c4-f4 area. Could that be where my mix is? And is from the forehead how a mix usually feels?
#11
Quote by Mattofla
Thanks for the replies.

Usually when I start my practice, the rasp isn't really there. After an hour or so it becomes more prevalent. I have also started to notice that the rasp almost isn't there whenever I use the O vowel on the F. It feels more like I am transitioning into a head voice tone. Pulling chest might be my problem.

Good enough time as any to work on cleaning up my technique, though.

Yeah, the rasp is very nice whenever I do more "angry" type songs.

Last question, what would be a good exercise to work on that area? I've heard of the witch's cackle, and I'll try and sue that more. Anything else?
Now when you say O vowel do you mean "oo" or "oh"?

Anywhere, that's the same basic problem I used to have. Your vocal cords aren't compressing and you're instead closing your throat to bring them together. Pushing with this and raising the pitch will also cause your tongue to do some funky stuff. What you might notice it doing is rising at the tip. If the tip of your tongue is hanging the edge of your teeth, this is a bad sign. It should roughly touch the bottom of the inside of your bottom teeth. If you can do this while relaxing the muscles underneath your tongue(you can check on them by gently resting your thumbs on the underside of your chin) and keep it that way while singing, it will sort of force you to release your throat and compress your vocal cords.
#12
How high is your larynx when you sing these notes? I'm no expert by any means, I'm half-expecting someone to correct me on this, but I sometimes catch myself letting my larynx rise far too much for high notes, and raspiness is a symptom of it.
I'LL PUNCH A DONKEY IN THE STREETS OF GALWAY
#13
Quote by grampastumpy
Now when you say O vowel do you mean "oo" or "oh"?

Anywhere, that's the same basic problem I used to have. Your vocal cords aren't compressing and you're instead closing your throat to bring them together. Pushing with this and raising the pitch will also cause your tongue to do some funky stuff. What you might notice it doing is rising at the tip. If the tip of your tongue is hanging the edge of your teeth, this is a bad sign. It should roughly touch the bottom of the inside of your bottom teeth. If you can do this while relaxing the muscles underneath your tongue(you can check on them by gently resting your thumbs on the underside of your chin) and keep it that way while singing, it will sort of force you to release your throat and compress your vocal cords.


Thanks for the tip. This clears up the notes noticeably.

Whale: My Larynx rises a tad, but it doesn't shoot up under my chin.