#1
Hi,

I have a question about borrowed chords

What can you chords can you borrow from parallel minor?

Can all the chords of a parallel minor be used in a major progression?

Thanks
#2
Yeah you can borrow any chord. The most common chords borrowed from the relative minor are probably the following: iv ♭III ♭VI ♭VII and here's some common progressions that use them...

♭VI ♭VII I (major tonic but using the classic minor progression)

♭VI or ♭III in a four chord trick such as I ♭III IV V or I ♭VI IV V

IV iv I Kind of an extended plagal cadence (listen to how that major third in the IV moves down a half step to the minor third in the iv then down another half step to the fifth of the I chord - nice little "trick").

But yeah you can borrow any chords from the parallel minor when in a major tonality. Whatever suits your ear.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Apr 22, 2011,
#4
I had the same question a couple months ago the title was the same as this one
Weird.....
Lol
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#5
Quote by Metallicuh
I had the same question a couple months ago the title was the same as this one
Weird.....
Lol


why do we even have a searchbar?
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#6
Sorry about that

I had an additional question uhm how do you notate the progression if you borrowed a chord

Like if the progression is Dm - A maj(this is the borrowed chord) - F maj

how would you notate this.

Is it I -V- III?

Sorry I'll use the searchbar next time sorry for the inconvenience
#7
I would do i V ♭III but yeah your's works too - you're in a minor key so it's often assumed the III is referring to the triad built off the minor third in the key and commonly notated without the ♭.

EDIT: oops but yeah make the tonic minor - either by notating it as minor Iminor Im or by using lower case for minor and upper case for major so i for the minor tonic.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Apr 23, 2011,
#8
Quote by gothblade
Sorry about that

I had an additional question uhm how do you notate the progression if you borrowed a chord

Like if the progression is Dm - A maj(this is the borrowed chord) - F maj

how would you notate this.

Is it I -V- III?

Sorry I'll use the searchbar next time sorry for the inconvenience



I would write i - V - bIII

But where does it go from there?
#9
Well I'm just analysing the song The Man who sold the world by David Bowie and well that's it

I think the whole chord progression is in C major I just realized it now and I thought it was in D minor cause it was the first chord but it resolved in C.

And I got the wrong chords(dammit my ears need a bit more training)

It's Dm - A maj - C maj

Sorry for the confusion

If it is in C then there are no borrowed chords at all I guess but if It is in Dm I guess it's

i - V - VII
Last edited by gothblade at Apr 23, 2011,
#10
Quote by 20Tigers
I would do i V ♭III but yeah your's works too - you're in a minor key so it's often assumed the III is referring to the triad built off the minor third in the key and commonly notated without the ♭.

EDIT: oops but yeah make the tonic minor - either by notating it as minor Iminor Im or by using lower case for minor and upper case for major so i for the minor tonic.


whoops yeah it's supposed to be in lower case hehe

My brain must not be working right now
#11
V in a minor key isn't considered a borrowed chord. It occurs naturally in the harmonic minor scale and is used more often than the v from the natural minor because of its functionality.
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