#1
Okay so,
I have a Floyd rose on my guitar. My friend has a different type of Floyd rose but it's still a floyd.
I can't go from drop to standard without it screwing up the whole tuning set.
His, however, will and he doesn't need to block the tremolo to do it.

My guitar: Alexi 600
His guitar: Jackson Dinky

What's going on here?
I'd like to know if I can mod my tremolo without blocking it so I don't have to buy a new/different floyd.
#3
Quote by sexybacon

...which is useless unless you have a traditional (ie not low profile), non-recessed Floyd.

TS, there's one of two possibilities.

1 - He's had an aftermarket tremsetter installed like a Tremol-No
2 - He either can't tell or doesn't give a shit if his guitar goes out of tune.

I have a Jackson Dinky, the trem's average and it goes out of tune if you muck around with the tuning, same as any other Floyd variant.
Actually called Mark!

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#4
Firstly, is it a Licensed Floyd, or an Original?
Assuming you didn't change the tremolo, I'd say it's an Original right?
Floyds have always been a problem for almost any guitarist who uses a Floyd, no matter if it's a Licensed or Original. Only difference is that the Original is more robust and heavy than the Licensed, which is thin, light and easy to move.

My B.C Rich has an Original and whenever I tune to drop tunings (Ranging from D to A) thus making the string's tension to reduce, I put something thin but strong in between the frame around the tuners of the tremolo and the body to keep the tremolo from diving (turning to the body) with something like the handle of a spoon and such.

Now the tremolo won't dive and keep f*cking up your tuning. Now tune your guitar to whatever tuning it is you want, but keep the spoon (or whatever you're using) in place.
Flip over your guitar and you'll see a square, plastic plate. Remove it and you'll see a set of springs, ranging from 3 to 5. You now have to adjust the springs (Note: Original Floyds tend to stay in place easier than the Licensed Floyds).

This WILL take a lot of time the first few times you retune your guitar, mostly because you'd have to adjust the springs by estimating the right length and keep tuning your guitar untill the tremolo will be parallel to the body. This is mostly why I like to keep both my B.C Rich and my Jackson on one certain tuning (Drop D and Drop C).

You won't be needing to buy a new Floyd Rose because it's wobbly, you just gotta tame it :P Springs will become more smooth after a few tunings and will take less time to adjust, maybe won't even have to in while (small chance though). Also, the state of your strings is important, when slamming on new ones, try stretching them first (this will reduce the diving of your tremolo) and put them on ONE BY ONE, I can't say that enough. Putting them on one by one will keep tension and WILL save you hours of restabalising!

Hope this helped, good luck!
#5
My friend has an Ibanez RG350DX and he tunes it to drop B but for some reason the bridge (Edge III) doesn't move, he has no idea why but since it seems to be alright he just gets on with it :L
I don't think there's a proper way to get this kind of effect (unless as stated earlier you use an add-on such as the tremol-no) so you shouldn't really worry that yours screws up, but if you do want to drop tune, what exactly is wrong with hard tailing a guitar? That's the effect the tremol-no gives
#6
Quote by TheBlackening91
My friend has an Ibanez RG350DX and he tunes it to drop B but for some reason the bridge (Edge III) doesn't move, he has no idea why but since it seems to be alright he just gets on with it :L
I don't think there's a proper way to get this kind of effect (unless as stated earlier you use an add-on such as the tremol-no) so you shouldn't really worry that yours screws up, but if you do want to drop tune, what exactly is wrong with hard tailing a guitar? That's the effect the tremol-no gives


Yeah, but I like my tremolo to float. That's why I have a tremolo in the first place.
I honestly prefer a floating bridge over a solid one. It's just better for me.
#7
Quote by AshFreek88
Yeah, but I like my tremolo to float. That's why I have a tremolo in the first place.
I honestly prefer a floating bridge over a solid one. It's just better for me.


In that case you'll have to either get another guitar or set up your bridge every time you want to change tunings. it's the only real downside to the floating bridge, that and the whole dual bending thing. It's cool though, at one point the best anyone had was a standard tremolo like you'd find on strats, in a few years we'll have the best of both worlds!
#8
Quote by TheBlackening91
In that case you'll have to either get another guitar or set up your bridge every time you want to change tunings. it's the only real downside to the floating bridge, that and the whole dual bending thing. It's cool though, at one point the best anyone had was a standard tremolo like you'd find on strats, in a few years we'll have the best of both worlds!

Actually I already have a system drawn up to go between standard and drop. I just don't have the materials or money to make it.