#1
I was wondering what scale would have a flat 6th in it?

I'm guessing it's harmonic minor?

I was playing something an E major scale but I played a C instead of a C# and it sounded pretty cool with a C#.


The lick is like this


e `171614  1614
b       17     14   14
g                 17

Would it be harmonic, or is it a mode and I'm just not thinking clearly
Could it even be just a chromatic passage in an E scale, though I assume it would have a name because I've heard alot of this stuff, especially in heavy metal/shred music
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
Last edited by TDKshorty at Apr 23, 2011,
#2
the natural minor has a flat sixth... in C the sixth is G which would be flatened to A#
#3
Harmonic minor and natural minor have flat sixth. Also the phrygian mode has flat sixth. If you were playing in E major and then played a C natural, you were probably playing what's called 'modal borrowing.' You are in the major mode but 'borrow' a pitch from the minor mode. It has an interesting, sort of unexpected musical sound when used.
#4
Harmonic minor has a flat 3 and 6, it differs from natural minor as it retains the natural 7th (whereas natural minor has a flat 7th)

The scale with a flat 6th is likely Harmonic MAJOR, being 1 2 3 4 5 b6 7

Just for reference-
Natural Minor - 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Harmonic Minor - 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7
#5
Your tab is a little screwed up, but that 17-17-17 is the A minor chord, so I guess you're borrowing the iv chord from E minor.
#6
Sorry, I fixed it now, what do you guys think?
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#7
Well, you're in a major scale and you've just got an out of scale note. No need to think where it came from, it's more about what it does in context. It adds that bit of tension and leads back to the C#, as you probably figured in the first place. It doesn't change the scale you're in.
#8
Both natural and harmonic minor scales have a b6 in them.

As for that lick, you're using C# harmonic minor. And the correct name for that C note in this case would be B#. You're raising the seventh degree , B note, by a half step to B# so it acts as a leading tone to C#.
#9
Normaly, I would've answered them that they can be used both as accidentals and in natural harmonic minor and phrygian but people are going to put me down for it so don't believe me!
#10
It's not from any scale (well, you could say C# harmonic minor), it's just a secondary leading tone to C#. It's actually not a C, it's a B#. If you were to harmonize it you would use a G# major/dominant chord.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea