#1
I usually use guitar honey on my Jacksons fretboard, and I just wanna know, I got a new Les Paul yesterday for $1400 out of the Platinum Room at my local Guitar Center, Is it okay to use Guitar Honey on the neck of this one too? or is there something else I should use to maintain my fretboard?


EDIT: Also, the bridge fell off when I was putting new strings on, are the saddle screws supposed to be facing pickups or not?
Last edited by BlueFuzion101 at Apr 23, 2011,
#2
If it's fine on your Jackson, it'll be fine on the Gibson.

Saddle screw -wise, it doesn't matter which way you put the bridge as long as the guitar is intonated correctly. The bridge works either way. Just put it back on the way it came off. I have the saddle screws facing the pickups, but that's just the way it was when i bought the guitar.

EDIT: Personally, i use mineral oil, but some people like linseed oil and lemon oil, but they are both just as effective
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Apr 23, 2011,
#4
Put the bridge on with the screws facing the pickups, tune up and check the intonation. A small flathead screwdriver is all you need to move the saddles back and forth
Roses are red
Violets are blue
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#6
Quote by BlueFuzion101
I have no idea how to intonate the guitar.. Haha. Is it complicated at all?

It's tuning the guitar...
#7
Intonation is the tuning accuracy of the guitar at fretted notes reletive to the tuning of the open strings. Just because your guitar is tuned up doesn't mean it's intonating correctly.

1. Tune the guitar up to perfect pitch first. Do this with a tuner because it's more accurate.
Then touch the string you want to intonate on top of the 12th fretwire (without fretting it) and pick the string. You should hear the 12th fret harmonic ring out clearly.

2. When you fret the 12th, that pitch should be identical to that of the 12th fret harmonic. If it is flat or sharp, the intonation is out. The way you adjust the intonation is by moving the screws back and forth.

3. If the 12th fret is sharp, turn the screw anticlockwise. Doing this will make the string slightly longer when you fret it. If it is flat, do the opposite. Then retune the guitar and hit the 12th harmonic and then fret the string at the 12th fret. If the intonation is correct, the two notes should be exactly the same pitch. If it isn't repeat step 3 until it is perfect. Once it is, move onto the next string and repeat the process.

If you have a tuner handy, you don't need to fret the harmonic at all and just use the tuner to tell you if it's flat or sharp
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Apr 23, 2011,
#9
1) tune a string.
2) fret at the 12th fret, check pitch with a tuner. Is it the same note you tuned to, just one octave higher? If so, the string's intonating properly. If not:
Is it slightly flat? If so, move the saddle a little towards the pickups and start over at 1).
Is it slightly sharp? If so, move the saddle a little towards the tailpiece and start over at 1).

Do this for all six strings.

Quote by Chimara
It's tuning the guitar...

#10
Quote by WtrPlyr
The screwheads on the saddles should be not facing the pickups so you can turn them with the strings on the guitar.


Either way around, it can be fiddly because the strings obstruct when the bridge is either way around, it makes no difference
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



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#15
why with those tune o matics, from the factory the screws always face the pick ups? it seems more convenient to have them NOT face the pick ups, there must be a reason they do it that way.