#1
Hey, I was looking at learning some theory since I don't normally look at it. What are some things I should learn?

Thanks, Adam
Last edited by asmithgdci at Apr 23, 2011,
#2
buy The Guitar Handbook. Read. Read again. Prosper.
"The man that hath no music in himself, nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils. The motions of his spirit are dull as night, and his affections dark as Erebus. Let no such man be trusted."
#3
Quote by asmithgdci
Hey, I was looking at learning some theory since I don't normally look at it. What are some things I should learn?

Thanks, Adam


What do you presently know/understand?

Why are you considering learning theory? What do you want to be able to do once you know it?

What's your musical background?

Best,

Sean
#4
I know a lot of piano theory, I have been playing for 8 years, some of that I can translate to playing on guitar, but when I started guitar I played tabs, no notes and no theory. I would like to learn theory because when people talk about major 5ths, dominant 7ths and things like that I have no idea what they are talking about. I would like to be able to know what notes are in certain keys and about the circle of fifths

thanks
#7
Hi asmith!

What everyone said here is definitely true, learn your fretboard! I waited a long time and definitely would have learned it sooner had I known how much it helps!

Secondly, start learning basic theory at the same time. You already have piano knowledge so that should come in handy as I find piano very very helpful in learning theory.

So the best thing to do is to get a teacher or get a book! Online there are tons of things too but teachers/books tie things together a lot nicer sometimes.

Best of luck
"Experience is not what happens to you. It is what you do with what happens to you." - Aldous Huxley
#8
This: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ci6aTve_fAU was something I tossed together quickly but the idea is fairly solid -- learn where E F and G are on each string .. say them while you play them and drill on that 10 minutes a day. Find where B, C and D are, do the same. Know where A is on each string.

The next step is connecting these to the C major and A natural minor scales and some tunes in C major or A minor to help get the position of all the natural notes burned solidly into your memory.
#9
Quote by Zen Skin
This: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ci6aTve_fAU was something I tossed together quickly but the idea is fairly solid -- learn where E F and G are on each string .. say them while you play them and drill on that 10 minutes a day. Find where B, C and D are, do the same. Know where A is on each string.

The next step is connecting these to the C major and A natural minor scales and some tunes in C major or A minor to help get the position of all the natural notes burned solidly into your memory.



This really helped, thanks

Thanks to everybody else for your advice too
#11
Yeah I didn't mention that. The way I learned all the notes on the fretboard was by learning and playing through each key that way. I started with C/am, then went on to G/em (one sharp) and so on, adding one new note at a time. Thats something that takes a fair amount of time but perhaps something you should think about doing!

Another helpful exercise was to limit the strings that I played on while doing the above. I'd sometimes limit myself to only one string, or a set of two strings. Like just improvising over a backing track using only the 6th string, or 5th and 4th. I found that to help A LOT in "opening up" the fretboard so you don't feel limited by shapes or boxes. I'm not sure if you're getting that problem but I know this really helped me.

Thanks for knowing when to ask for help! That's a lot more than a lot of guitarists!
"Experience is not what happens to you. It is what you do with what happens to you." - Aldous Huxley