#1
I thought I'd ask you guys opinion on something.

I've been playing guitar for about 10 years, and I've been playing classical for 4. With classical, I tried to self-teach myself classical, but eventually I decided I needed a teacher to teach me classical, and I cleaned up a lot of the dos and don'ts with right and left hand technique, posture, all that good stuff.

I'd consider myself well-educated in classical guitar. My major is in music performance with classical guitar, and all that. In other words I think I know what I'm doing (even though I definitely didn't when I started).

But I've been wanting to learn Flamenco for a while since classical can get a bit boring after a while. Since classical and flamenco guitarists share some very similar technique, and the difference isn't as large as classical and blues or Rock for instance, do you think I'd be able to teach myself Flamenco alright? Or do you think I should still go ahead and get a teacher so I don't fall into many popular mistakes with technique or anything?
#2
If you're already as far advanced in classical guitar as it seems you are then you should have no problem what so ever learning Flamenco by yourself.
The main thing you will probably need to work on is the rhythm of the right hand and the intense strumming that is needed, also keeping a beat using the guitars body is very common that I don't think is used much in classical guitar playing.
At the end of the day, just give it a shot and if you feel like you would benefit from lessons you can always give them a shot later!
#3
Do that 99.9% of flamenco is traditionally not written down and passed down from teacher to student.i highly suggest a teacher. nobody i know has been able to successfully teach flamenco to themselves.....

i know quite a few flamenco players that are absolutely amazing. they told me that learning flamenco is somewhat alike to classical guitar but that someone intersted in flamenco should study with a teacher. and Pepe Romero told me that flamenco is an art form that should be learned by every classical guitarist because it helps to focus on different things that classical guitarists miss.
Classical Guitarist
Last edited by Zep_shizzle at Apr 24, 2011,
#4
Quote by Zep_shizzle
Do that 99.9% of flamenco is traditionally not written down and passed down from student to teacher.i highly suggest a teacher. nobody i know has been able to successfully teach flamenco to themselves.....

i know quite a few flamenco players that are absolutely amazing. they told me that learning flamenco is somewhat alike to classical guitar but that someone intersted in flamenco should study with a teacher. and Pepe Romero told me that flamenco is an art form that should be learned by every classical guitarist because it helps to focus on different things that classical guitarists miss.



This, more or less. It can be hard to find a good flamenco teacher though...at least here in Australia anyway.
#5
First off, I don't wish to sound rude but Pepe Romero needs to learn to keep his paws of Flamenco. While his message is most certainly true, and where I feel that it is ALWAYS bad to limit one's self musically, he didn't get his own message. His renditions of Flamenco pieces are mediocre at best.

Matter of fact is that I'm going to be getting back at working on my Flamenco information and the like, if you'd have time I'd love to work on this so I can get things going again. I've had a horribly busy few years, and any help is appreciated. I've studied with a Flamenco teacher for a short while, and had about 4 years of research on it before that. I'd love to go on a run-through with you for a bit as it'd help me get my mind straight on everything again as well. I need to get to finish what I started.

Cheers
Wise Man Says: The guitar is obviously female, she's got hips, breasts... and a hole.
UG's Flamenco Club
#6
Quote by FretboardToAsh
First off, I don't wish to sound rude but Pepe Romero needs to learn to keep his paws of Flamenco. While his message is most certainly true, and where I feel that it is ALWAYS bad to limit one's self musically, he didn't get his own message. His renditions of Flamenco pieces are mediocre at best.

Matter of fact is that I'm going to be getting back at working on my Flamenco information and the like, if you'd have time I'd love to work on this so I can get things going again. I've had a horribly busy few years, and any help is appreciated. I've studied with a Flamenco teacher for a short while, and had about 4 years of research on it before that. I'd love to go on a run-through with you for a bit as it'd help me get my mind straight on everything again as well. I need to get to finish what I started.

Cheers



More or less but I can understand why Pepe's not so good at flamenco, the techniques for both styles are very different, it's very hard to be a master at both. If you were you make Paco Pena play some classical guitar, he would sound God awful on it. I do agree with what you say though, Pepe's flamenco isn't too hot.