#1
What the !@(& is the big deal with 'sweep picking'? As a matter of fact, what the &@$$ is it, and why should I use it?
#2
Sweep picking is how women play guitar...

(and to those who say I spam, I base the value of my answers on the value of the original post...)

Just because I'm nice...
You can call me Aaron.


♠♣♥♦
Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...
Last edited by biga29 at Apr 23, 2011,
#3
Quote by mr.EDS-1275
What the !@(& is the big deal with 'sweep picking'? As a matter of fact, what the &@$$ is it, and why should I use it?



Sweep picking is, extremely simply, playing individual notes on different strings without them "blending" together.

Whats the big deal with it? I admit, its overrated, but check it out. Not the best example, but still.

Why should you use it? To impress people. Also, you could have a song tha needs a really intense solo, and use SP in it.
NT

BE QUICK OR BE DEAD SON
#5
Its basically another way to shred. It sounds all flowy and cool. Ask Paul Waggoner about it some time
#6
this belongs in the "Techniques" forum, but to answer the question, sweep picking is a technique used to plays consecutive notes on adjacent strings using one single fluid motion instead of having to individually stroke each note. the result is smoother and more economical than picking each note individually, and the technique is usually used to play fast arpeggio runs spanning over at least an octave, sometimes as much as 3 and a half octaves.

and forget all the above videos (the ones in the posts below are better), this is sweep picking:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CwLiwU-n9Kw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MO0oo3cHT8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87Iz3RHZNDQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KV8Aoy8dH-A
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGH9b8iQG74
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Apr 23, 2011,
#8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hb5QaCfm7bg starts at 2:18, another good example. To the above, the children of bodom solo DOES have sweeping, the a7x one does not. this song uses sweeping a lot though. its just a fluid speed technique, originally developed by examples of violin. It sounds really neat once you can get it down
Schecter C-1 Classic in Seethru blue <333
Schecter Damien FR
Roland AC-60 acoustic amp
Boss GE-7 EQ
Line6 Ubermetal Distortion
Sigma Dx Acoustic
#9
Quote by Zinnie
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hb5QaCfm7bg starts at 2:18, another good example. To the above, the children of bodom solo DOES have sweeping, the a7x one does not. this song uses sweeping a lot though. its just a fluid speed technique, originally developed by examples of violin. It sounds really neat once you can get it down


Lol my brain melted at 2:57, I didn't know something like that was possible...
#10
To be honest, people make too big of a hype over sweep picking in my opinion.
I mean sure, it impresses people and it's nice to add to a solo once and a while...

What benefited me most is that I could review the scales I learned again.
#11
Quote by farmosh203
Lol my brain melted at 2:57, I didn't know something like that was possible...


My mouth fell to the floor. That was so far beyond epic
#13
the main idea of sweepings been established....so im just here to say, it ads a certain flair to solos and can be used for a lot of different genres. from death metal to neoclassical shred. i prefer 3 string sweeps though, not that crazy 5-string tap sweeping haha. its a pretty fun techinque when mastered, thats for sure
Quote by kangaxxter
The only real answer to the SG vs Les Paul debate is to get a Flying V and laugh at all the suckers who don't have one.


Quote by Blompcube

if you embrace inaccurate intonation it can be quite arousing.


I <3 TWEED
#14
Sweep picking is fun.

Check out XIV by Born of Osiris
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FBbzopfoi2M

Selkies by BTBAM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19UZd_DKs2Q

Beyond the Dark Sun by Wintersun
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B6px4BLVtdg

keep in mind that these are metal songs, and that other genres use the technique as well(it's just most associated with metal)

I hear the technique in a lot of jazz stuff as well.