#1
By now I understand the whole idea of everything being based on the major scale, I know I've asked dumb questions about scales before, but I've got all that down now (I know time moves fast but I've actually been here for almost a year and my dumb questions were many months ago...time's odd huh?), so I don't need anybody to give me a review of the basics.

So there are a lot of websites around with big lists of exotic scales that really seem almost entirely unnecessary to learn. I think at this point the only new scales I should be learning are altered scales and bebop scales, because they have real practical applications. (btw, i've already got the diminished and whole tone scales down, to use over diminished and augmented chords) All these other crazy scales, even if some of them sound kinda cool, don't really have any kind of application at all. I mean if its just for the sound, I can just put whatever intervals together I want to use for whatever sound and I've got it.

So I know obviously I shouldn't be wasting any of my time on these exotic scales right now, but does anyone think they're worth looking into in the future at all or should I just ignore them completely?
#2
In my opinion, you should learn them if you want. If you are going to use them, learn them.

You could also learn them, to see if you could get inspiration from them.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#3
Nothing should ever be ignored completely but it generally isnt a necessity if that makes sense

Why don't you delve further into song writing and using these scales to use and such
Or time signatures and such
#5
scales expand your musical vocabulary. I find that I use the chromatic and pentatonic scales the most, but knowing others can only make you better.

I say learn scales for the styles you want to play and to add spice to your music
Quote by Twist of fate
Why must the fat die young
#6
i always felt that if you approach everything in life with an open mind, learning more can never hurt you
#7
Quote by vampirelazarus
In my opinion, you should learn them if you want. If you are going to use them, learn them.

You could also learn them, to see if you could get inspiration from them.


This^.

I like exotic scales and I use them a lot. If you wan't to learn just for the sake of 'knowing' I'd say there's no use. But if you are going to make music using those scales, then by all means, learn them.

Why don't you listen to a few songs that use those scales and see if you like them. If you do, getting to know exotic scales will help. If not... you know what to do
#8
Quote by Martindecorum
Why don't you delve further into song writing and using these scales to use and such
Or time signatures and such

i write songs like 24/7 and haven't really been using "scales" for most of my material.

the way i write most of my songs now is with chord progressions, obviously through use of the major scale, that use methods like non-diatonic chords and key changes to make them more interesting, and my lead parts come about from just knowing what intervals i wanna use. i analyze what i wrote afterwards and figure out what scales i can use for improvisation

thanks for the input every1
#9
Quote by TMVATDI
By now I understand the whole idea of everything being based on the major scale ...



Playing scales is not the same as playing music.

There are a LOT of very good songs in straight up C major .. learn some.

Learning more scales is great. But play music -- do something with what you have learned or it just ends up being mechanical and boring.
#11
Quote by Zen Skin
Playing scales is not the same as playing music.

There are a LOT of very good songs in straight up C major .. learn some.

Learning more scales is great. But play music -- do something with what you have learned or it just ends up being mechanical and boring.


i've been doing that, no worries :p
I think the following scales will be sufficiant:
1. major
2. pentatonic/blues
3. melodic minor
4. harmonic minor
5. diminished
6. whole tone


these are the only scales i ever use for improvisation, but i use techniques like chromatics and outside-tones of course. my brother suggested i learn altered scales and bebop scales and explained their uses to me (he's in a bunch of jazz guitar classes in college right now) so i guess that's what i look into next
#12
If you ARE going to learn all the wild scales, know what makes them tick and be able to relate them to other scales.
#13
What I've been doing is adding/removing/modifying notes in scales I already know. That way, I know how to use most of the scale already, but there are new elements to it that I can play around with. I know a lot of that exotic sounding stuff now because of it (granted, I hardly know the names of any of them. But as long as you know what sound you're going for, you don't really have to care).
#14
If you truly understand the major scale and tonal harmony, you should never have to learn another scale in your life.

Quote by -Blue-
What I've been doing is adding/removing/modifying notes in scales I already know. That way, I know how to use most of the scale already, but there are new elements to it that I can play around with. I know a lot of that exotic sounding stuff now because of it (granted, I hardly know the names of any of them. But as long as you know what sound you're going for, you don't really have to care).
Yep that's the way to go, in my opinion. You can get all those sounds just by altering the major scale, so why put yourself in the position where you limit yourself to individual scales for a certain type of sound.

Don't get me wrong, knowing how to name various scales is a good skill, but don't waste too much of your time on this rather than actually applying this stuff.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Apr 24, 2011,