#2
Means that the Piece is in G#m/B
Quote by CoreysMonster
Why, my pasty danish cracker, I believe you've got it!
#3
Its in G#m or B major. So all the notes are sharpend except E and B.
#4
Everything on the rows with the # signs are going to be sharps, unless stated otherwise in the piece.

This is used so that you don't have loads of sharps and flats in the piece as you sight read (when you become proficient at it), because that would be messy to read. This also shows the key of the song aswell.

Edit: There's a bit of a learning curve using this system, so stick at it and it'll become natural.
Last edited by Silent Murder at Apr 24, 2011,
#5
How can you tell that it's in G#m or B? They're all so squished together, I can't really tell which lines the sharps are lying on..
R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio. Supplied amazing music to both me and my mother.

He will be missed.
#8
The G#m and B scale have 5 sharps in the scale.
If you know what notes are the sharp notes, you don't need to constantly look back at the 5 sharps at the start.

You need to know a little theory to understand these (just the basic scale compositions of major/minor)

B, C♯, D♯, E, F♯, G♯, and A♯

so C D F G and A are the notes you will have to make sharps, unless stated otherwise.

Edit: I just saw what song it is. Bloody briliant film.
Edit 2: Eveeryone elses way is MUCH easier.
There's a good chance that what I've written above is useless and if you take any of the advice it's your own fault.
Last edited by Silent Murder at Apr 24, 2011,
#9
Sharps always appear in the same order F C G D A E B. flats are in reverse
#10
Is the F C G D A E a general thing or only for this certain song? Where's the B supposed to be? Is E the only note not sharped in this song?

Sorry for the stupidity, I only started learning sheet music a few days ago, still don't know anything haha.

EDIT:

I guess the B is at the end haha: F C G D A E B

Quote by Silent Murder
The G#m and B scale have 5 sharps in the scale.
If you know what notes are the sharp notes, you don't need to constantly look back at the 5 sharps at the start.

You need to know a little theory to understand these (just the basic scale compositions of major/minor)

B, C♯, D♯, E, F♯, G♯, and A♯

so C D F G and A are the notes you will have to make sharps, unless stated otherwise.

Edit: I just saw what song it is. Bloody briliant film.
Edit 2: Eveeryone elses way is MUCH easier.


Damn. Yeah I don't know a word of what you just said. How do you figure out it's in G#m and/or B? Do you need to figure that out in order to figure out the F C G D A E B order? Does that order not apply to everything?

Damn, this was much easier when I thought those sharps just meant every note is sharpened.
R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio. Supplied amazing music to both me and my mother.

He will be missed.
Last edited by larrytheguitar at Apr 24, 2011,
#11
there isn't actually a b sharp. A B sharp would be a C note
There isn't a half note between B and C and between E and F
And the sharps are always in that order.
So there can't be a G sharp in the beginning without a F sharp and C sharp.
But you can have only a G sharp, but then it would be noted next to a Gnote and not in the beginning.


If you see all the sharps and can't seem to figure out the scale, just look at the last sharp and take the note above it.
The one with the F sharp is G major
The second one with the C sharp is D major...
And if you want to figure out the minor key of that scale just look at your guitar. This is how I do it.
For instance C major, put your first finger on the C note (5th string 3rd fret) and the put your 3rd finger on the string above it, 2 frets higher. That's an A note.
So it's C major and A minor.
You can do this with all the notes, from major to minor and minor to major (you'll have to look the other way for the major scale ofc)

So take your B major (b note= 2nd fret 5th string, minor = 6th string 4th fret : G sharp minor!!)
Last edited by toine at Apr 24, 2011,
#12
Quote by toine

there isn't actually a b sharp. A B sharp would be a C note
Yep, got that..
There isn't a half note between B and C and between E and F
Mhm, got that too
And the sharps are always in that order.
Alright, thanks
So there can't be a G sharp in the beginning without a F sharp and C sharp.
.. There can't be a G sharp in the beginning of.. what. Beginning of the song?
But you can have only a G sharp, but then it would be noted next to a Gnote and not in the beginning.
You lost me


That picture demonstrates the F C G D A E B and the reverse flats right?
R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio. Supplied amazing music to both me and my mother.

He will be missed.
#13
Quote by larrytheguitar
That picture demonstrates the F C G D A E B and the reverse flats right?

I mean the beginning of the staff, like your 5 sharps.

With that added G (or any other sharp) i mean like this

See how there isn't a scale in the beginning, but he adds other sharps after the beginning?
This is because those sharps are only for those measures, not for the complete song!

You'll have to learn and understand the circle of fifths!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjH4SFqNKtk
Last edited by toine at Apr 24, 2011,
#14
Oh I understand. So you were saying that the reason the sharps are before the time signature is because all notes the sharps are on will be sharps for the whole song? In this case, it would be that all F C G D and A notes would be sharp? I think I get that.

But how do you figure out that the song is in G#m and/or B?
R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio. Supplied amazing music to both me and my mother.

He will be missed.
#15
Hey yall thanks for helping out, and I'd appreciate any additional information you can give me. Until then, I'm gonna go to sleep and tackle some more theory after school tomorrow.

Thanks
R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio. Supplied amazing music to both me and my mother.

He will be missed.
#16
Quote by larrytheguitar
Oh I understand. So you were saying that the reason the sharps are before the time signature is because all notes the sharps are on will be sharps for the whole song? In this case, it would be that all F C G D and A notes would be sharp? I think I get that.
correct!
But how do you figure out that the song is in G#m and/or B?

Look at my edited post below the circle of fifths!


Here you see a double flat, that means 2 frets lower, the reason they don't just put that note eg. Dbb(double flat) = C note has some theory behind it..
You will most likely see this when the other notes (the C or D) have already been altered int the piece.
The same goes for that double sharp.
These "accidentals" don't happen all that much, unless you're playing classical music.
That natural note is something you might see from time to time.
This means that that certain note wich has a natural in front of it, is restored to it's natural self.
So if you have your B scale and then you'll see an A (natural) means that it's no longer an A sharp!
This also means that the scale is changed from 5 sharps to 4!
You will never see a double flat or sharp before the key signature only in front of the note that is changed.



Here's a good site to learn theory
http://www.sionsoft.com/MusicNotation.html
Last edited by toine at Apr 24, 2011,
#17
It's just a key signature, I suggest you look into learning the circle of fifths and how many sharps/flats dictate what key it is.

The sharps always go in this order;

FCGDAEB (Father Christmas Gave Dad An Electric Blanket)

The flats:

BEADGCF (Basically the inverse of the sharps)

So if you google a picture of the circle of fifths, you can see that if a key signature contains only one flat (the B flat) than it's in F major, if it contains two flats ( the B flat and the E flat) then it's in Bb major, if it contains one sharp (the F sharp) then it's in G major etc.... It is almost all just a case of knowing how many sharps are in a particular key and then corresponding that to the key signature given on the sheet music.


That may be a little confusing so if it has lost you, feel free to PM me and i'll explain it further

Hope that helps, good luck with learning it all

Aidan =D
#18
Quote by larrytheguitar
But how do you figure out that the song is in G#m and/or B?


See what Chords are used in the song and where it resolves to. As both keys are enharmonic so the sharps and flat at the start will show you how to recognise the ntoes used.
From that, and the piece itself you can work out the key. I think
#19
Quote by larrytheguitar

Damn, this was much easier when I thought those sharps just meant every note is sharpened.


The easy way would be to play those notes that have those sharps, sharpened.

All you need to do to, for now, is remember that those notes are sharp.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#22
^Something to do with Father Charles???

A kind of palindrome mnemonic

order of sharps
Father Charles Goes Down And Ends Battle

order of flats
Battle Ends And Down Goes Father Charles
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Apr 26, 2011,