#1
Hi all,

I was wondering if being lazy in learning songs of other people is going to be detrimental in me developing as a musician. I just don't seem to be very enthusiastic in learning songs of other people much and I just like to compose my own(though my works are to me, subpar and needs improvement).

Maybe some tips to help me learn songs of other people?
Cause I don't seem to have trouble in being enthusiastic with composing my own stuff.

Is this normal? I just feel that I'm missing a lot if I don't learn songs from other people.


Thanks
#3
It's a double edged sword really.

On one hand learning other peoples songs can expose you to techniques you'd otherwise not know about or just not know how to use.
On the other hand it can often influence your playing too much and stifle your creativity (as is the case with me at the moment)
Originally Posted by Chromeproguitar
they make horrible noises in the middle of the night (is it sex?)

Quote by CliffIsAngry
I guess she's pretty hot if you're into that "having a good music video, but not better than Beyonce's" kind of thing...
#4
You are to be honest. It's hard to become a talented author without ever reading a book by someone else. Learning from other people is immensely valuable if you want to improve.
#5
i have that problem to. it sometimes helps if you just learn the part of the song that interests you the most. i now adopt you as my brother.
#6
Quote by dontknowitall13
i have that problem to. it sometimes helps if you just learn the part of the song that interests you the most. i now adopt you as my brother.


Even though I want to I dunno I'm just a completionist I guess but I'll do that

It just gets boring just learning one part of the song over and over then looking at all the parts left and just saying "**** this"

Hey bro
#7
Quote by gothblade
Even though I want to I dunno I'm just a completionist I guess but I'll do that

It just gets boring just learning one part of the song over and over then looking at all the parts left and just saying "**** this"

Hey bro


yeah, but if you want to do something similar to the song your listening to its a good idea to have some idea of how to do it.

and yes we will now begin to take over the world.
#8
Quote by dontknowitall13
yeah, but if you want to do something similar to the song your listening to its a good idea to have some idea of how to do it.

and yes we will now begin to take over the world.


Guess you're right.

Thanks bro. Time to mobilize
#9
Start a cover band
I know Lucifer so well I call him by his first name...I say, "Hey Lou!"
#10
Quote by gothblade
Hi all,

I was wondering if being lazy in learning songs of other people is going to be detrimental in me developing as a musician.


Being lazy is generally detrimental.

Quote by gothblade

I just don't seem to be very enthusiastic in learning songs of other people much and I just like to compose my own(though my works are to me, subpar and needs improvement).


well, if your being creative and coming up with things thats great, but learning songs that someone else wrote won't take that away from you. If anything it'll give you more to work with.

Quote by gothblade

Maybe some tips to help me learn songs of other people?
Cause I don't seem to have trouble in being enthusiastic with composing my own stuff.


Find music you like..... then learn it.

Quote by gothblade

Is this normal? I just feel that I'm missing a lot if I don't learn songs from other people.
Thanks



I dunno if it's normal, but your instinct about missing out on alot is correct.


Quote by alkalineweeman

On the other hand it can often influence your playing too much and stifle your creativity (as is the case with me at the moment)


Na, thats a myth. The lack of creativity isn't caused by the learning of songs written by other people.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 24, 2011,
#11
Try putting on some music on a stereo and just playing along. I don't know how good your ear is, but that's a great thing to do. You don't need to read off of music in order to "learn" a song, nor do you have to learn every part.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#12
I know exactly how you feel. What i found helps is to learn a song or two a week and just work at the song for a little bit everyday before i start to do my own thing, that way you're kind of warmed up too.
You and I are mortal, but rock n roll will never die.
#13
Quote by GuitarMunky

Na, thats a myth. The lack of creativity isn't caused by the learning of songs written by other people.


I'll qualify that a little by adding... IF you are learning from a palate that is varied enough to allow you to actually BE creative.

I knew a guy who knew every Randy Rhodes solo ever recorded. "Mister Crowley... bar 18... backwards to the beginning...." and he'd probably be able to do it.

The problem was, that seemed to be *all* he knew. Ask him to play anything original and everything - invariably - sounded like a spinoff of something by Randy Rhodes.

I guess it is like any other artist. If all you have is orange, then good luck. If you have a varied palate, then you have a world of possibilities before you.

That palate can come from your own creative explorations, or from your study of other artists/genres/etc., or some combination thereof.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#14
Quote by axemanchris
I'll qualify that a little by adding... IF you are learning from a palate that is varied enough to allow you to actually BE creative.

I knew a guy who knew every Randy Rhodes solo ever recorded. "Mister Crowley... bar 18... backwards to the beginning...." and he'd probably be able to do it.

The problem was, that seemed to be *all* he knew. Ask him to play anything original and everything - invariably - sounded like a spinoff of something by Randy Rhodes.

CT


even in this case, the "lack of creativity" is not caused by the learning of music written by other people.

Quote by axemanchris

That palate can come from your own creative explorations, or from your study of other artists/genres/etc., or some combination thereof.

CT


Yes, it generally does. (come from a combination of those things).

I don't believe that too many people could even have creative explorations on the guitar without 1st having some experience playing 1st. That generally means playing something that someone other than yourself wrote.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 24, 2011,
#15
Sounds like me. I'm a lot more focused on composing than playing. Usually, when I play existent songs, it's either for analysing purposes or for backing me up as I sing. (Though occasionally it's some riff that I figure will be fun to play.) So I'm never really worried about perfection. And I do think that it holds back my progress in technique.
That, and the fact that I downplay/underrate technique all the time. For instance, I don't think I've ever been "impressed" by anyone's guitar skills, in terms of technique. My opinion on someone's guitar playing depends most of all on the guitarist's personal style.
Last edited by sickman411 at Apr 24, 2011,
#16
Quote by gothblade
Hi all,

I was wondering if being lazy in learning songs of other people is going to be detrimental in me developing as a musician. I just don't seem to be very enthusiastic in learning songs of other people much and I just like to compose my own(though my works are to me, subpar and needs improvement).

Maybe some tips to help me learn songs of other people?
Cause I don't seem to have trouble in being enthusiastic with composing my own stuff.

Is this normal? I just feel that I'm missing a lot if I don't learn songs from other people.


Thanks



im in the same boat,i like learning bits and pieces but havent really got the time to learn full songs,i think i have my own voice on guitar,u will find that over time u will get heaps better at writing own stuff if u stick with it,im in a real good place as far as arranging songs and stuff,good luck to u.
#18
Quote by Zen Skin
FWIW I can not think of a guitar player that I admire who will not readily list his or her influences.

They all learned by imitating what they liked.

When in doubt, remember what Picasso once said ... amateur artists borrow, professional artists steal.


Well of course I have influences.

I actually take bits and pieces of some of the songs I like sometimes and/or unconsciously get a minorly similar riff with my influences but I cannot for the life of me learn all the parts of the songs of my influences cause well I get lazy


That's about it

Thanks to all that replied. I guess I just have to be not lazy in learning them
I'm just afraid that I won't have time to compose anymore if I learn all the songs I want to learn and well I guess things I'm composing are more important than the songs I would be learning.



Originally Posted by jcboomer

I know exactly how you feel. What i found helps is to learn a song or two a week and just work at the song for a little bit everyday before i start to do my own thing, that way you're kind of warmed up too.



Originally Posted by food1010

Try putting on some music on a stereo and just playing along. I don't know how good your ear is, but that's a great thing to do. You don't need to read off of music in order to "learn" a song, nor do you have to learn every part.


I'll try to do this dude Hope it motivates me to learn a full song for once
#19
Quote by gothblade
Well of course I have influences.

...


I mean when you listen to a great guitar player talk about where they got ideas .. George Benson will mention Wes Montgomery. Hendrix will mention B.B. King, Muddy Waters and Wes Montgomery. EVH will mention Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page. Joe Pass will mention Wes and Django Reinhardt. Jeff Beck will mention everyone ... including Les Paul and Roy Buchanan.

And these guys learned solos note for note from their heroes as they were developing. No tabs, no internet ... they'd sit by a record player and grind it out.

And a lot of guitar players mention Wes Montgomery and Django Reinhardt.. worth noting.
#20
Quote by Zen Skin
I mean when you listen to a great guitar player talk about where they got ideas .. George Benson will mention Wes Montgomery. Hendrix will mention B.B. King, Muddy Waters and Wes Montgomery. EVH will mention Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page. Joe Pass will mention Wes and Django Reinhardt. Jeff Beck will mention everyone ... including Les Paul and Roy Buchanan.

And these guys learned solos note for note from their heroes as they were developing. No tabs, no internet ... they'd sit by a record player and grind it out.

And a lot of guitar players mention Wes Montgomery and Django Reinhardt.. worth noting.


I'll keep that in mind then Thanks. I guess I'll just have to get off my ass and just do it.
#21
Here's a thought, though, too...

In my life, I have learned very few guitar solos - at least from the rock idiom. In my original songs, I have no difficulty coming up with my own, and they're invariably pretty decent. (if I do say so myself... haha....)

But I don't feel I'm drawing from my "guitar solo" influences as much as I am drawing from my "melodic" influences and expressing them on the guitar.

I don't just sit down and wank for 30 seconds and call it a solo. I construct an entirely new melody... one with phrases that build and go somewhere, and I have a LOT of playing and listening experience from other artists and genres that influences that.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#22
I'm going to dissent from the groupthink a little here.

You can learn all you need from others' songs by just listening. You don't have to learn how to play them.

Indeed, it is boring to go note-by-note through a solo. And, once you've dissected a song to learn it you won't enjoy listening to it in the same way afterwards. At least that's what I've found.

So my advice is if you don't enjoy learning to play other people's music and you do enjoy making your own then make your own. It will get better and better. Other people's songs just stay the same.
#23
Quote by Jehannum
I'm going to dissent from the groupthink a little here.

You can learn all you need from others' songs by just listening. You don't have to learn how to play them.

Indeed, it is boring to go note-by-note through a solo. And, once you've dissected a song to learn it you won't enjoy listening to it in the same way afterwards. At least that's what I've found.

So my advice is if you don't enjoy learning to play other people's music and you do enjoy making your own then make your own. It will get better and better. Other people's songs just stay the same.


Well I was doing that until I realized that maybe I could learn something from those songs if I do try to play the song. This method is pretty cool though cause I don't have the need to replicate the lick or whatever and just come up with something different yet similar to it

It kinda works.

But thanks for the advice man.