#1
Hey,

So I recently broke a string on my Strat, and replaced it with an identical guage. Now whenever I play the A string (The replaced one) it buzzes. I've raised the saddle, still happens.


The thing is, it buzzes right up until the last fret, so I'm thinking it could be I'm not use to the sound of new strings..

Anyone got any insight?
#3
Since you have the Classic 50's Strat that means you have the 6 screw trem, right? Was your trem flush to the body or floating? That will make a difference. Replacing a single string will throw a float out of whack, and may even be enough to bring a flush into a float, thus decreasing your tension to the strings ever-so-slightly.

I would suggest opening up the back, adjusting the springs and screws to set the Trem to flush again, then readjusting your action and intonation from there. If you want a great lesson on how to do your Claw setup, check this out: http://www.guitarscanada.com/guitar-tech-section/3777-fender-stratocaster-6-point-tremolo-setup.html

That's how I set up my 6-screw trems, and they're usually rock solid.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#4
It's every fret, not open really...

And it was floating, I assume that means not on the body? And it annoys the hell out of me how it makes the tuning go out so badly.

I'm not sure if I want to set it flush really, I don't use the trem that much, if any really, so would it be an idea to block it rather ?

Edit:

I didn't make sense. I've realised I haven't put my trem bar in for ages, so I'm not fussed about using it.

Advantages of blocking Vs flush?

Edit: Or it seems you use 5 springs and then block to increase sustain?
Last edited by DeadlySurfer at Apr 24, 2011,
#5
Having it flush and having it blocked are almost/kinda the same thing. You have enough tension on the strings via the trem springs that it brings the whole bridge down and level with the body, thus not allowing any movement. If it floats, that's the cause of all your tuning instability. If you don't use the trem at all, then blocking it would be the solution.

What blocking would do is not allow any movement in the trem at all, essentially making it a hard-tail. This will get rid of most of your tuning issues. I'll assume you had it floating before, which I'm going to go ahead and say was probably the cause of your issues.

Bring the bridge all the way flush to the body, then find a wedge and place it against the trem via the rear trem route. Then adjust your action, adjust your truss rod, then intonate.

EDIT: If you have a block, the springs mean nothing.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#6
Quote by JustRooster
Having it flush and having it blocked are almost/kinda the same thing. You have enough tension on the strings via the trem springs that it brings the whole bridge down and level with the body, thus not allowing any movement. If it floats, that's the cause of all your tuning instability. If you don't use the trem at all, then blocking it would be the solution.

What blocking would do is not allow any movement in the trem at all, essentially making it a hard-tail. This will get rid of most of your tuning issues. I'll assume you had it floating before, which I'm going to go ahead and say was probably the cause of your issues.

Bring the bridge all the way flush to the body, then find a wedge and place it against the trem via the rear trem route. Then adjust your action, adjust your truss rod, then intonate.

EDIT: If you have a block, the springs mean nothing.



Not really down for adjusting my truss rod, never liked that idea...

Plus I've heard that people say it sounds very different without the floating trem.

Is there no way for me to get the buzz gone and keep it floating?
#7
Quote by DeadlySurfer
Not really down for adjusting my truss rod, never liked that idea...

Plus I've heard that people say it sounds very different without the floating trem.

Is there no way for me to get the buzz gone and keep it floating?



Not down for adjusting your Truss Rod? That's a basic step to maintain your guitar. You should read up on it.

Also, whether the trem floats, is flush, or is blocked, it has no effect on the sound. Trust me, I've own a lot of Strats.

You can get rid of the buzz by adjusting your claw angle, and redoing your action and intonation.

If you're uncomfortable with all this, I would suggest taking it to a shop.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#8
Quote by JustRooster
Not down for adjusting your Truss Rod? That's a basic step to maintain your guitar. You should read up on it.

Also, whether the trem floats, is flush, or is blocked, it has no effect on the sound. Trust me, I've own a lot of Strats.

You can get rid of the buzz by adjusting your claw angle, and redoing your action and intonation.

If you're uncomfortable with all this, I would suggest taking it to a shop.


Well, it's also a case of annoyance, due to having to take off the neck of my Strat to get to the truss rod. And I guess I've always been a bit over precautious about neck bending, which probably means I should know about the truss more

So, here's what I think I'd do:

Take off the strings
Remove the backplate and increase the string tension so the bridge is flat to the body
Put a piece of wood between the trem block and the body to increase sustain
Take off the neck and adjust the truss rod (Uncertain on which way)
Fit the neck again, restring, re-intonate and retune.

Is that all correct?
#9
You've got it. The goal of adjusting the truss rod is to make sure the fingerboard is flat.

If all that fails, then I would say that maybe you have some rough frets here or there that could use polishing. It is a Mexican neck, afterall. Quality Control on those are a tad notorious. Give that all a whirl and let me know how it goes!
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#10
Quote by JustRooster
You've got it. The goal of adjusting the truss rod is to make sure the fingerboard is flat.

If all that fails, then I would say that maybe you have some rough frets here or there that could use polishing. It is a Mexican neck, afterall. Quality Control on those are a tad notorious. Give that all a whirl and let me know how it goes!


Alright, I shall do my best.

I'm going to shield my Strat soon, so that would be a god time to do all this to save me taking off the strings twice.

I can't see it being the frets, after one strings breaks, only that string buzzes on all the frets? Just seems unlikely to me.

Have you got any good guides/sites for truss rod adjustment? I've done a quick Google but don't know who to trust.