#1
What do I have to take for the I, II, III etc ? as in minor or a major chord for the note of the minor scale.... someone pls tell me you understood this, cause I could phrase this question any better. :S


Thanks
#4
i iio III iv V VI VI.

The V is from the harmonic minor scale.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#5
Quote by MaddMann274
What do I have to take for the I, II, III etc ? as in minor or a major chord for the note of the minor scale.... someone pls tell me you understood this, cause I could phrase this question any better. :S


Thanks


Are you asking:

How to play a minor scale?

How to harmonize a major or minor scale?

I am not clear about your question.
#6
as in what chords i can play in the scale or something, i learnt the major scale thingey of this.. here it is....

I- Major
II- Minor
III- Minor
IV- Major
V- Major
VI- Minor
VII- Minor b5

like lets take A major scale.. the II note being 'B', i can play B minor chord.
Something like this....

My question is for the minor scale..
#7
Quote by MaddMann274
as in what chords i can play in the scale or something, i learnt the major scale thingey of this.. here it is....

I- Major
II- Minor
III- Minor
IV- Major
V- Major
VI- Minor
VII- Minor b5

like lets take A major scale.. the II note being 'B', i can play B minor chord.
Something like this....

My question is for the minor scale..



Oh, ok

It is the same -- just start on the 6th degree of the relative major scale.

In A minor:

i = A min
ii* = B diminished triad or Bmin7 flat 5 (B half diminished)
III = C maj
iv = D minor
v = E minor
VI = F major
VII = G major or G7

in A minor or in C major the chord based off of B is often played B D F (min with a flat 5 which is also known as a diminished triad) or B D F A -- which is Bmin7b5 or B half diminished ... there is a little confusion because a diminished chord is also sometimes called a diminished 7 chord and would use B D F A-flat ... B D F A natural is called B half diminished or B minor 7 flat 5, depending on who you ask.

In E minor:

i - Emin
ii* = F# minb5
III = Gmaj
iv = Amin
v = Bmin
VI = Cmaj
VII = Dmaj

HTH
#8
Quote by food1010
i iio III iv V VI VI.

The V is from the harmonic minor scale.


But a lot of people would say E G B is the v in A minor .. though I get your point.

The other argument is that E G# B D is from the parallel major.

In either case the movement E G# B to A C E is a stronger cadence. Hmmmmm

I learned this from a jazz teacher so it'd always be E7b9 to Amin7 or Amin(maj7) ... I assumed the move to the harmonic minor for a cadence was more "jazz thing" ??
#9
Thanks man
I have been trying to find this for a long time... What is this called? Triad Chords? o.O
#11
Quote by Zen Skin

I learned this from a jazz teacher so it'd always be E7b9 to Amin7 or Amin(maj7) ... I assumed the move to the harmonic minor for a cadence was more "jazz thing" ??


The idea of raising the seven when approaching the tonic is pretty well universal.

Also, Food put forth a kind of hybrid harmonization by giving you the raised seven in just the V chord. Most typically you derive the harmony of the minor scale from the harmonic minor scale, so you get:

i iidim III+ iv V VI viidim

But you can really take the harmony from all three minor scales.

Natural minor:

i iidim III iv v VI VII

Melodic Minor:

i ii III+ IV V vidim viidim
#12
Quote by Zen Skin
But a lot of people would say E G B is the v in A minor .. though I get your point.

The other argument is that E G# B D is from the parallel major.

In either case the movement E G# B to A C E is a stronger cadence. Hmmmmm

I learned this from a jazz teacher so it'd always be E7b9 to Amin7 or Amin(maj7) ... I assumed the move to the harmonic minor for a cadence was more "jazz thing" ??
"The idea of raising the seven when approaching the tonic is pretty well universal." Yep, that's not just a jazz thing. In fact, classical music is what made it standard, then that transfered into modern music (including jazz).

Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Also, Food put forth a kind of hybrid harmonization by giving you the raised seven in just the V chord. Most typically you derive the harmony of the minor scale from the harmonic minor scale, so you get:

i iidim III+ iv V VI viidim

But you can really take the harmony from all three minor scales.

Natural minor:

i iidim III iv v VI VII

Melodic Minor:

i ii III+ IV V vidim viidim
From the music I study (which doesn't really include classical, admittedly), I have seen very few examples where chords other than the V were derived from the harmonic minor or melodic minor. From what I've seen the norm is to harmonize the natural minor, except for the V (or the vii°, but the bVII is still more common in my experience).

Quote by MaddMann274
Thanks man
I have been trying to find this for a long time... What is this called? Triad Chords? o.O
Actually, I think the term you're looking for is "harmonizing a scale." The term for the type of chord is triads, but harmonizing a scale is finding the triads that occur in a scale.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Apr 25, 2011,
#13
Quote by food1010

From the music I study (which doesn't really include classical, admittedly), I have seen very few examples where chords other than the V were derived from the harmonic minor or melodic minor. From what I've seen the norm is to harmonize the natural minor, except for the V (or the vii°, but the bVII is still more common in my experience).


To be honest, I agree that in most pop you'd be more likely to see VII and III, but generally when laying out the harmony of a minor scale the harmonic minor i-iidim-III+-iv-V-VI viidim is pretty standard for analysis. In the end, it simply doesn't matter