#1
i cant get rid of it.. how should i ajust my bridge ? as in high or low ?

all i found on google was things on acoustics

12-52 gauge, drop c but it happens in drop d also but not as bad
#2
It happens to me in standard.... its REALLY ANNOYING!
The Difference between:


PINK

and....

PINK FLOYD


#5
Seriously, read the stickies on Guitar Setup.

First of all, you have, in my opinion, wrong string gauge for drop C. 52 on a LP is too thin for the C. 56 or 60 is more suitable. Definately less buzz. I'd recommend the DR Jeff Healey set for drop C because it has the 56 for the low C but thinner ones more suitable for the rest of the strings.

As for the adustment, in a nutshell, you have to find a balance between the comfortability of having the strings low and having them high but not buzzing.

You have LP TOM bridge which is really easy to adjust. It's hard to give exact measurements. Trial and error. Set it so that it's comfortable but doesnt buzz disturbingly much.

I wouldn't do anything with the truss rod before getting a more suitable string set.
Last edited by Rautio at Apr 24, 2011,
#6
Quote by Rautio
Seriously, read the stickies on Guitar Setup.

First of all, you have, in my opinion, wrong string gauge for drop C. 52 on a LP is too thin for the C. 56 or 60 is more suitable. Definately less buzz. I'd recommend the DR Jeff Healey set for drop C because it has the 56 for the low C but thinner ones more suitable for the rest of the strings.

As for the adustment, in a nutshell, you have to find a balance between the comfortability of having the strings low and having them high but not buzzing.

You have LP TOM bridge which is really easy to adjust. It's hard to give exact measurements. Trial and error. Set it so that it's comfortable but doesnt buzz disturbingly much.

I wouldn't do anything with the truss rod before getting a more suitable string set.


good post thanks.. my gauge is fine for drop d tho and it still happens, btw its an explorer :P i'll do some trial and error now.. again
#7
Pay an experienced guitar tech to set up your guitar. There's a huge difference between the setup you get by stumbling through it yourself with a tutorial and what you get by paying someone who has been doing a couple setups every day for ten years. Especially if the frets need work.
#8
Quote by jpnyc
Pay an experienced guitar tech to set up your guitar. There's a huge difference between the setup you get by stumbling through it yourself with a tutorial and what you get by paying someone who has been doing a couple setups every day for ten years. Especially if the frets need work.


This is a good idea if you're gonna get your guitar set up very seldomly or if you want to find out the proper "settings".

Otherwise it's a huge waste of money, especially if you're like me, trying new tunings and experimenting with string gauges, not to mention trading guitars really often. Self-suffiency also means being able to setup the guitar whenever you want and instantly. Besides, by doing it yourself you don't have to rely on the expert to know your pick attack. And of course it's a mandatory skill if you're living in a place 100km from the nearest guitar shop.
#9
Quote by Rautio
Self-suffiency also means being able to setup the guitar whenever you want and instantly. Besides, by doing it yourself you don't have to rely on the expert to know your pick attack.


this. i believe paying a guitar "tech" to do a simple task is just stupid.

ANYWAY, i failed at trying to fix it.. still got string buzz. i even put it up pretty high, if i put it any higher i wont be able to play and it still buzzes.. oh the irony
#10
Setting up a guitar (bridge height, neck relief) could probably be done on your own.

But if you need a fret leveling or a nut job (lol) you should probably consult a pro.
#11
Where is the buzz? Is it only in the first five frets? If so the guitar's truss rod is probably too tight.
Always tin your strings.

_____

Don't be afraid to be honest.
Last edited by Gargoyle2500 at Apr 25, 2011,