#1
So I'm trying to work on a post metal song with a good amount of big chords (Maj7b5, m7b5, etc.) and I seem to have trouble with getting the notes to be heard clearly. If I turn down the distortion + tube screamer the sound gets very frail and loses its sustain and quality, however if I try and up it becomes shrill and grating to the ear. Any tips on EQing this? I'm using Guitar Rig 4 if it helps, thanks!
#2
Quote by KnownUnknown
So I'm trying to work on a post metal song with a good amount of big chords (Maj7b5, m7b5, etc.) and I seem to have trouble with getting the notes to be heard clearly. If I turn down the distortion + tube screamer the sound gets very frail and loses its sustain and quality, however if I try and up it becomes shrill and grating to the ear. Any tips on EQing this? I'm using Guitar Rig 4 if it helps, thanks!


You could record each note individually?
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#3
Turn down the gain a little and double track it? Try increasing the mids-hi mids. Don't go increasing too high of a frequency though, or you'll end up with fizzy, weak guitars. Also, the root of the problem could probably be traced back to your pickups.
#4
Turning down the distortion and then either double tracking or running some tape saturation will probably be your best bet. Alternatively, you could try doing one guitar track with your basic 3 string chords (root, b5, octave) and then a layer it with a second part playing the rest of the chord.

Also, if you have multiple guitars at your disposal, try someone with a single coil in the bridge instead of a humbucker.
#6
I very rarely produce metal but when I'm recording heavily distorted guitars in other genres I also record a clean guitar playing exactly the same thing and keep it very low in the mix, with careful EQ'ing and balancing you can get a lot of definition from this guitar.
#7
^ this is one of the things i would recomend. get the power from one track, and the clearness and note separation from another. similar stuff gets done with bass all the time, but people dont tend to use the same things for guitar.
double tracking will help as well.

if it was a physical amp, i would have suggested turning it up (assuming decent tube amp). a lot of amps sound more powerful at a higher volume, and this can translate over to when it is recorded. cant really do the same thing in software though.