#1
In addition to my sweeping thread, I have a question about tapping. I am able to tap using different patterns, and add notes and such to those patterns. When I tap during a solo or lead part, does it work to just tap the notes of the scale? Is that how to make tapping sound good? or does it have to do with arpeggios of the chord/key being played over?

Any help is really appreciated. Thanks
#2
It depends what sound you're going for. Some times you might want to just tap out arpeggios when other times you might want some sort of tensions and what not going on.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#3
Quote by food1010
It depends what sound you're going for. Some times you might want to just tap out arpeggios when other times you might want some sort of tensions and what not going on.


By tensions do you mean tap notes which are outside of the scale? And are you saying that I can choose whether I want to tap arpeggios, or tap notes from an entire scale? Does it just depend on the sound I'm going for?
#4
Quote by BDags
By tensions do you mean tap notes which are outside of the scale? And are you saying that I can choose whether I want to tap arpeggios, or tap notes from an entire scale? Does it just depend on the sound I'm going for?
Yeah. Basically, my point is just use whatever you want; chord tones, non-chord tones, chromatics, whatever.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#5
its all about the sound.
if your tapping an A major arpeggio, and you tap an F# (if the F# was added to the A major chord, it would make the chord AM6), if it you like the sound of that chord, go for it.

personally, tapping is definately one of my favorite techniques, because it allows you to play ANY note on the fretboard, no matter how far away from all the other notes it is.
its like total fretboard freedom.
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
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#6
honestly I find that tapping an extended form of a chord is a great way to practice incorperating tapping into your arsenal...

so if the chord your playing over is Gmajor tap out a simple Gmaj7 (GBDF#) arppegio or a G7(GBDF) arppegio.... the other thing that helped me was picking good notes to tap with the right hand, I found that till I was comfortable it was easiest to use the root note of the chord or the root of the scale, which eventually changed to bouncing between the two. so if I was playing over a chord progression that was I IV V in C major I would tap the C for the first bar, then jump between C and F in the next bar and then C and G in the third bar.

another thing you can to is just use all the notes in the scale up and down that particular string(s). eventually you will be able to move around more and find things you like, but it takes sometime. anyways hope this helped and good luck!
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#7
TS the answer to both your threads are that they are simply different ways of playing notes. Whatever notes you choose are up to you.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#8
You should always be in the key of the backing!
Unless your playing chromatic lines or accidentals.
But one way of making your tapping sound good is taking a pedal tone and play in a key that has that tone and playing around with the other notes that are in that key.
Such as I'm in C major.
Say I'm tapping over an Fmaj chord.
I would choose as pedal tone one of the chord tones the best is to do the root.
Then you would play like F pull it off to E F D F C F B etc.
Examples that use this is the last ascending part of the fast tapping in Steve Vai's Hand On Heart, or Joe Satriani's always with me always with you the tapping part.