#1
It's healthy, escaping.
From Twin Cities Trashmen
to temping skyscrapers,
subway scamps, busking for baggies
and meandering home unable to locate
neither Goggle Box, nor
Georgia's eternal soul(which were
last seen one in front of,
neither paying attention to the other).
It's a scene American as
Ray-Bans, Tom Cruise,
and the good sick coming onto her
in this Post-Reagan Porn era.

Corr was no Sgt. Smack,
an immoral sleepwalker, tapping
like VT sappers to placate the reaper
out of his Harlem Renaissance for a bit of
Deck-Shit Mortal Combatant.
Predator drones circling with “pilots”
living vicariously through robots,
and Corr would only mutter, “GeeCeeTee”
before accompanying poison people to a matinee.

Nearness comes in varying degrees,
and in this 5:30 blue line to the, “Take Charge, Take Care”
terminal, every one explored everyone.
With external influence, even tattoos resembling Morrissey become
unforgettable visible eccentricities, but never
talking points on 116th street until this
temple of treasure troves, trash,
bio-diesel jazz and the Lucas empire
comes into view.

Set design is apparently everything to The Fitz,
but he shows no remorse
portraying Georgia the good seed
caught with red rum, flexing carpals,
corporeal and adorable, and mumbling
something about how sharks keep moving
even while asleep.
All the while those Red River kids are sandbagging again,
threaded together with an ebbing temp's temper
and the thought of a possible trip to Hazleden to
reinsert the golden apple girl with the green meanies, hoodrats
and the possibility of a Hallelujah friend.

Maybe the TV will just have to wait a few paychecks.
Last edited by wizards? at Apr 24, 2011,
#2
I don't really understand most of it for some reason. I must be all the references that I don't get. It does sound very poetic though.
Strange, It seems like a character mutation, Though I have all the means, of bringing you fuckers down, I can't make myself, To destroy upon command, Somehow forgiveness, lets the evil make a loss - Danger Mouse/Sparklehorse/Wayne Coyne
#3
^If you'd like me to break it down for you I certainly wouldn't mind, but I'll have to send you a PM. If this gets any crits I want them to be blind, not seeing the explanation of every line and knowing exactly what I'm saying. I want to see how other people interpret it first before I give everything away.

For some reason that sounded very pretentious...
#4
i cant follow this either, though it does sound very deep and poetic as walkingminstral mentioned, perhaps too deep for me haha
#5
Please read the original post first.

Quote by wizards?
It's healthy, escaping.
From Twin Cities Trashmen
to temping skyscrapers,
subway scamps, busking for baggies
and meandering home unable to locate
neither Goggle Box, nor
Georgia's eternal soul(which were
last seen one in front of,
neither paying attention to the other).
It's a scene American as
Ray-Bans, Tom Cruise,
and the good sick coming onto her
in this Post-Reagan Porn era.
[This stanza is about someone who has just moved from the Twin Cities to New York City, working as a trashmen(also a reference to the band The Trashmen(They wrote Surfin' Bird) who were from the Twin Cities) who comes home after a day at their new job as a temp in an office to find that their roommate named Georgia has run off with their TV. She is going off to pawn it to score and shoot some heroin, hence the "busking for baggies" and "good sick" lines which allude to heroin use.]

Corr was no Sgt. Smack,
an immoral sleepwalker, tapping
like VT sappers to placate the reaper
out of his Harlem Renaissance for a bit of
Deck-Shit Mortal Combatant.
Predator drones circling with “pilots”
living vicariously through robots,
and Corr would only mutter, “GeeCeeTee”
before accompanying poison people to a matinee.
[Corr is a heroin junkie/dealer. Sgt. Smack was a notorious accomplice of Frank Lucas, one of the most notable heroin dealers in Harlem. He "Taps" or steals from the bags he deals to get his fix. "GeeCeeTee" his way of saying Grand Central Terminal, where Georgia probably went to shoot up the dope he sold to her just before he accompanies some other junkies to shoot up and nod off in a movie theater.]

Nearness comes in varying degrees,
and in this 5:30 blue line to the, “Take Charge, Take Care”
terminal, every one explored everyone.
With external influence, even tattoos resembling Morrissey become
unforgettable visible eccentricities, but never
talking points on 116th street until this
temple of treasure troves, trash,
bio-diesel jazz and the Lucas empire
comes into view.
[It's nearing rush hour, and the narrator is trying to get to Grand Central Terminal on a packed subway through Harlem. "Take Charge, Take Care" was the name of a controversial informational pamphlet that was issued in New York on how to safely and properly shoot dope. (The Morrissey tattoos line is a memory I had from being on the same subway line a few years ago. I saw a girl with a tattoo that simply said, "THE SMITHS". When I told her I thought it was a pretty awesome tattoo, she promptly told me to, "Fuck off in the politest way possible). Anyway, the end of the stanza brings Grand Central Terminal into view, a temple of treasure troves and trash. The Lucas Empire is another shout out to Frank Lucas, the dope king]

Set design is apparently everything to The Fitz,
but he shows no remorse
portraying Georgia the good seed
caught with red rum, flexing carpals,
corporeal and adorable, and mumbling
something about how sharks keep moving
even while asleep.
All the while those Red River kids are sandbagging again,
threaded together with an ebbing temp's temper
and the thought of a possible trip to Hazleden to
reinsert the golden apple girl with the green meanies, hoodrats
and the possibility of a Hallelujah friend.
["The Fitz" is a reference to F. Scott Fitzgerald, an author with ties to both Minnesota(where the characters are from) and New York City(where the characters have moved). Georgia was always viewed as, "The good seed", or the good child until this whole heroin addiction came about, and she's caught with "red rum"(murder backwards, also slang for dope), flexing carpals(she's injecting it), yet somehow she has a somehow real bodily beauty about her while this is all going down. The line about sharks moving while asleep is her view on nodding off, and how she's still functional, but very high. "Red River kids sandbagging" refers to Grand Forks ND and the almost yearly flooding of the red river, but unlike the red river, the Temp's temper with Georgia for shooting up again is ebbing, and they're more worried about taking care of her. Hazleden is a psychiatric/substance abuse ward back in Minnesota that they could possibly send her to in hopes of helping her addiction.]

Maybe the TV will just have to wait a few paychecks.
[This is probably the easiest line to understand(if you've understood the rest), it's the decision that buying back the TV will have to wait until the narrator pays for her to get into treatment.]


There's still a bit more to it than that, I just don't want to explain every single line and get rid of every last bit of mystery and ambiguity in the piece.

Also, I'm sorry I've bumped this semi-inadvertently with all these edits, I won't touch it until someone else posts.
Last edited by wizards? at Apr 25, 2011,