#1
This might be the wrong area? but
Okay, so my band is gonna start using back tracks to play live with. We are without a bassist and synth and we don't need one. That's beside the point. So we have the synth recorded, the drummer is comfortable with the click. etc etc, all the logistic stuff is good.

Right now we're gonna do the recordings panned left and click panned right. split the music from an iPod and feed to headphone/P.A. system. But heres the problem, since theres both treble synth and bass.. bass, we don't know what level to set them at. any thoughts on what do with that? Or are there any alternatives to iPods that give us adjustable levels on the two different parts? Don't suggest laptops please; I've seen them fail too often on stage.

and now one last question. with the bass tracks, we need them recorded. We can't do it at home due to poor quality. We would rather not have to pay for studio time (don't give me grief). Are there any bass VSTs that could substitute for a real bass?
#2
Your approach using the ipod is perfectly fine. That's how we did it.

Q#1 - You're going to want them set relative to each other. Once they are set, you won't want them moved. Your best bet is to set them how you think they should go at rehearsal and try it out. If one is too loud or not loud enough, then adjust it and try it again at the next rehearsal. Lather, rinse, repeat until it is perfect and then stop screwing with it.

Q#2 - You can totally record bass tracks at home. There is no reason to have to accept poor quality - at least not for one instrument. Get a free program like Audacity or a free trial like Reaper. Beg, borrow or rent a cheap interface (or hell.... even buy one... ), plug the bass directly into it or run a line out from a bass amp, set a click, arm the track and go.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#3
Quote by axemanchris

Q#1 - You're going to want them set relative to each other. Once they are set, you won't want them moved. Your best bet is to set them how you think they should go at rehearsal and try it out. If one is too loud or not loud enough, then adjust it and try it again at the next rehearsal. Lather, rinse, repeat until it is perfect and then stop screwing with it.
Wouldn't it differ among all the different venues and P.A.s?

Q#2 - You can totally record bass tracks at home. There is no reason to have to accept poor quality - at least not for one instrument. Get a free program like Audacity or a free trial like Reaper. Beg, borrow or rent a cheap interface (or hell.... even buy one... ), plug the bass directly into it or run a line out from a bass amp, set a click, arm the track and go.
That's right, we don't want to accept poor quality. we want it to sound great. the reocrding setup we have right now, for some reason can't record bass well. but it can record everything else fine. There's no punch in the bass. It seems to be all treble.

Replies in bold.
#4
1. No. The levels, no matter where you play and what you play through, are always adjusted relative to each other.

2. How are you recording it, and with what?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.