#1
Hey all.
I've got a question about 9 11 13 chords.
I know they are the 9 11 and 13 of that chord, but where do I take those?
Say I'm in Cmaj then I play this Emadd9 E/F.
Do I take my 9 from the E minor scale or do I take it ffrom the C major scale?
Steve Vai's For The Love Of God goes like that.
The chord has an F# in it, so I could conclude you take it from it's natural minor.
But is this always like that or is this an odd one out?
#2
There are two kinds of extended chords ... the add 9 (11 or 13) and the dominant 9 (11 or 13)

The dominant chords function like dominant chords -- they are there to add tension.

The add 9 chord .. whether major or minor is will add .. flavor.

You can do whatever you want with them, obviously. But they do not add tension the way the dominant extended chords do -- so A minor add 9 can be treated like an A minor chord under most circumstances.

As for what you should do .. what does Vai do??
#3
the scale that the chord names... so like Cmajor9 will be C E G B D no matter what key you are in or Emadd9 would be E G B F# in any key.

just like a major chord is the 1 3 5 of the key represented by the chord name (C maj is always CEG), not the key you are playing in.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#4
Quote by krypticguitar87
the scale that the chord names... so like Cmajor9 will be C E G B D no matter what key you are in or Emadd9 would be E G B F# in any key.

just like a major chord is the 1 3 5 of the key represented by the chord name (C maj is always CEG), not the key you are playing in.

Thanks!
#5
Chord tones/extensions are all taken in relation to the root of the chord. Like kryptic was saying, you start with that 1 3 5 and go off of that. It helps if you visualize the whole stacked thirteenth chord, like 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 and just take the notes you need. So an add11 would be 1 3 5 7 9 11 13. Then from there, you reorder them in order to make a workable voicing.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Apr 25, 2011,
#6
Quote by liampje
Hey all.
I've got a question about 9 11 13 chords.
I know they are the 9 11 and 13 of that chord, but where do I take those?
Say I'm in Cmaj then I play this Emadd9 E/F.
Do I take my 9 from the E minor scale or do I take it ffrom the C major scale?
Steve Vai's For The Love Of God goes like that.
The chord has an F# in it, so I could conclude you take it from it's natural minor.
But is this always like that or is this an odd one out?

Going over ground that has already been covered and just to reiterate the point...

You form that major interval above the root of the chord.

9 and 13 indicate major intervals above the root of the chord. 11 indicates a perfect interval above the root of the chord,

Regardless of what key you are in or whether the base triad is major or minor or even an inversion - the numbers indicate a major (or perfect) interval above the root note of the chord. UNLESS there is a ♯ or ♭ tagged to the number then you would raise or lower that interval respectively.

Em9 is an E minor seventh chord extended to include the major ninth above the E (F♯
Em♭9 is an E minor seventh chord extended to include the minor ninth above E (F).

An E7♯9 is an E dominant seventh chord with a raised ninth interval E G♯ B D F♯♯ (the F♯♯ is enharmonic to the minor third G so effectively it's a chord with both the major and minor third in it. However it is written as an augmented second F♯♯ not a minor third because if you write it on a staff each of these notes F♯♯ and G♯ will have their own lines - one note on the F line and the other on the G.) This particular chord can be heard prominently in Purple Haze.

The same goes for those intervals lower down so 2 and 6 are always major; 4 is always perfect - unless stated otherwise.

The chord is always assumed major unless stated otherwise.

The 7 is the only one that is assumed minor unless specifically stated, this just makes it easier when the triad is assumed major. That way if the chord name says Maj you know it's referring to the 7 because the triad is assumed major and you don't need to say it. Similarly a seven chord says minor you know that refers to the triad because the 7 is assumed minor and it doesn't need to be spelled out.

Everything else is assumed major or perfect in quality - unless noted otherwise.

And the intervals are always named from the root note of the chord being named.
Si