#1
Hello,
I have been playing guitar for almost six years now, but just a couple months ago, I started slide guitar. I picked it up relatively quickly, and now I want to start writing some songs that have bluesy slide leads in them. However, for the life of me, I just can't write anything that sounds good, as I am so used to writing leads for, I guess "normal" guitar. I was just wondering are there any specific scales or techniques I'm missing (I'm in Open E tuning as well).

Thank you for your response.
I'm just like the Jonas Brothers,

I'm no longer relevant and write mediocre music.


#2
Best universal tip for all styles is "look at some songs you like the sound of and deconstruct how,where,why,when to use techniques".

If it's solo slide guitar, think rythmicly
If it's soloing with a slide guitar, don't overuse it
#3
Quote by Silent Murder
Best universal tip for all styles is "look at some songs you like the sound of and deconstruct how,where,why,when to use techniques".

If it's solo slide guitar, think rythmicly
If it's soloing with a slide guitar, don't overuse it

Okay, thanks. And that was one of the problems I had at the start, when I was blending slide guitar with the rest of my solo I was overusing it. Luckily I got over that. Once again, thank you.
I'm just like the Jonas Brothers,

I'm no longer relevant and write mediocre music.


#4
there isn't anything you're missing except a better understanding of melody. Study some vocalists you like. It's ALL about melody. No trick, you just have to hear it. Open E is great.

--m
www.knobtwiddler.net
#5
Yeah, it's all about melody. If you like The Allman Brothers, try looking up Statesboro Blues and Memory of Elizabeth Reed. Duane was a master at improvising great melodies (All in open E as well)
#6
i play slide in standard and imo, everyone should. i found it so much easier to get decent at slide in standard that in an open tuning. one of the problems you might have is that you not only have to learn to play slide, you have to learn a new tuning. at least in standard its just a new technique. the notes stay in the same place.

also, with slide try to think of singing instead of playing an instrument. its all about the rhythm and melody. of course you should think that with normal playing but because the slide limits you in what you can play, they become more important. i would say listen to guys like derek trucks for someone who can make it sing. warren hayes is pretty good too and he plays in standard. derek plays in open E. joe bonamassa is pretty good too. he plays in standard too although he sometimes uses open E (which he used to always play in). sonny landreth is great too but more technical and uses the "fingers behind the glass" technique which allow him to play fast lines and alter chords. also plays in open E.

take your time too. dont be afraid to milk some notes. dont be afraid to repeat ideas a few times. slide is about making the guitar more vocal so again, think about singing more than playing a guitar. as you get better at slide you can get more technical but keep it simple for now.
#7
depends what you're doing. For accompaniment, such as the typical blues tunes, open tuning is the way to go.
Gives you easy "open" chords any time you want, and as well allows for lead playing as complex as you'd like.
Listen to Johnny Winters' "Dallas" for an example of stellar slide playing in open "G", self-accompanying.
Likewise any of the old blues masters. If you're playing "lead" lines with the slide, then standard tuning is fine; someone else can handle the rhythm.