#1
I figured that since guitar playing and comics have mildly similar demographics (male, free time), that you could tell me if this would be a good idea for a non canon Batman one shot. Keeping in mind it's not strictly serious, and just for fun.


The Bat Who Wasn’t There

Synopsis:

Bruce Wayne has died in a private jet crash. The media runs stories about how The Batman, a vigilante Bruce used to embody, was one of the greatest urban myths of all time, comparing him to the Loch Ness monster. A figurehead built up from legend and encouraged by a sensationalist media, and mask for Bruce Wayne’s charitable activities. Vigilantes may still adopt his face, but the “real” batman never existed.

However one such imitator, who has been abused by everyone he has met in his life and holds Batman up as a shining example of virtue, and cannot accept his childhood hero is just a legend. He flies into a rage, and tears all his posters off the walls of his tiny apartment.

He kidnaps Harvey Dent and threatens to kill him unless he can meet the real Batman. Harvey explains to him the ridiculousness of the concept of one of the most powerful men in the world being a bat themed vigilante, who risks his own life every night; and he gives him an invitation to his small private funeral.

He sees a pale white man with bright red lips who tells him how Bruce Wayne’s sponsored therapy helped him over his troubles after becoming a failed comedian; he meets an ugly long nosed man who tells him how he has been rehabilitated from addiction to collecting after Bruce Wayne aided the Gotham Police and helped his arrest.

Alfred Pennyworth approaches the confused youth at the end, he tells him how Batman may not have existed, but he gave a frightened city hope, he inspired young men like himself to take a stand, and whether or not Bruce Wayne was really a Caped Crusader or merely a socially active billionaire, Batman is still important, and the good he did was real. On his way out an extremely well built man with glasses and slicked black hair, passes him small parcel, but his wife Lois hurries him along. He opens in bed that night; it’s a picture of Batman and Superman, side by side on karaoke machine. He sleeps, confused and enlightened.
Last edited by Acidshred at Apr 26, 2011,
#3
Quote by Jaymz_515
Bruce Wayne dies an old man, Alfred still alive? Wicked!


...

Better change that before I get horribly flamed.
#4
Um...wait, how is this a decent comic? People don't read comics because they wanna hear batman was fake.

Also, why the hell isn't Alfred dead?...
#5
Holy crap, I'm glad you don't write Batman comics.

Unedited version for posterity:
I figured that since guitar playing and comics have mildly similar demographics (male, free time), that you could tell me if this would be a good idea for a non canon Batman one shot. Keeping in mind it's not strictly serious, and just for fun.


The Bat Who Wasn’t There

Synopsis:

Bruce Wayne has died of cancer, an old man. The media runs stories about how The Batman, a vigilante Bruce used to embody, was one of the greatest urban myths of all time, comparing him to the Loch Ness monster. A figurehead built up from legend and encouraged by a sensationalist media, and mask for Bruce Wayne’s charitable activities. Vigilantes may still adopt his face, but the “real” batman never existed.

However one such imitator, who has been abused by everyone he has met in his life and holds Batman up as a shining example of virtue, and cannot accept his childhood hero is just a legend. He flies into a rage, and tears all his posters off the walls of his tiny apartment.

He kidnaps Harvey Dent and threatens to kill him unless he can meet the real Batman. Harvey explains to him the ridiculousness of the concept of one of the most powerful men in the world being a bat themed vigilante, who risks his own life every night; and he gives him an invitation to his small private funeral.

He sees a pale white man with bright red lips who tells him how Bruce Wayne’s sponsored therapy helped him over his troubles after becoming a failed comedian; he meets an ugly long nosed man who tells him how he has been rehabilitated from addiction to collecting after Bruce Wayne aided the Gotham Police and helped his arrest.

Alfred Pennyworth approaches the confused youth at the end, he tells him how Batman may not have existed, but he gave a frightened city hope, he inspired young men like himself to take a stand, and whether or not Bruce Wayne was really a Caped Crusader or merely a socially active billionaire, Batman is still important, and the good he did was real. On his way out an extremely well built man with glasses and slicked black hair, passes him small parcel, but his wife Lois hurries him along. He opens in bed that night; it’s a picture of Batman and Superman, side by side on karaoke machine. He sleeps, confused and enlightened.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#6
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Um...wait, how is this a decent comic? People don't read comics because they wanna hear batman was fake.

Also, why the hell isn't Alfred dead?...

It's not in the actual storyline of the Batman comics.

TS, if you can flesh out that storyline a little more and draw the pictures, you can test if it's good.
Ceci n'est pas une signature.
#7
Quote by PsiGuy60
It's not in the actual storyline of the Batman comics.

TS, if you can flesh out that storyline a little more and draw the pictures, you can test if it's good.

Yeah, but it doesn't make sense that Alfred, the man who raised Bruce Wayne, would outlive him. Let's say that Bruce is 75 when he dies (a normal age of death for an American man, which doesn't take into account his extreme physical condition nor the hardships he endures). Alfred has been the Wayne's butler throughout Bruce's life, so let's assume that he was at least 30 when Bruce was born. Alfred is supposed to be 105 years old in this story?

Edit - This is Post-Crisis, naturally.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
Last edited by DaddyTwoFoot at Apr 26, 2011,
#9
I was thinking of using a more minor character, but I would much prefer have Alfred do the explaining, as I thought symbolically it worked better. I kinda forgot it might not pass the suspension of disbelief test.
#10
It doesn't really ever go anywhere. Also, you seem to just be complicating matters by making it Batman when it could just as easily be about a character you come up with yourself.
I play by my own rules. And I have one rule; There are no rules... but if there are, they're there to be broken. Even this one.


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#11
the idea of batman as an urban legend is interesting, but I think it needs work. Why should readers be interested in a protagonist who has never appeared in this series before and isn't really that special?
#12
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
Yeah, but it doesn't make sense that Alfred, the man who raised Bruce Wayne, would outlive him. Let's say that Bruce is 75 when he dies (a normal age of death for an American man, which doesn't take into account his extreme physical condition nor the hardships he endures). Alfred has been the Wayne's butler throughout Bruce's life, so let's assume that he was at least 30 when Bruce was born. Alfred is supposed to be 105 years old in this story?

Edit - This is Post-Crisis, naturally.


Perhaps I shouldn't have called him old. Was thinking either leaving him to die naturally at say 55, leaving Alfred at a perfectly reasonable age, or taking Bruce out in an accident during say his 30's or 40's. Sorry, I was a rush transcribing my ideas.

Also, yes perhaps, I shouldn't have used the Batman mythos, it could have worked well with a self created one.
#13
Okay, new question. Everyone finds out that Bruce Wayne is Batman after he dies?
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#14
I like it as a one shot, people in this thread don't understand alternate universes, and their popularity in comics. It'd be pretty fun just to see it done, especially if the boy was Tim Drake. Maybe just explore how Gotham City would have been had followed in his father's footsteps as a benevolent rich man instead of a martial artist.


Quote by Acidshred
Perhaps I shouldn't have called him old. Was thinking either leaving him to die naturally at say 55, leaving Alfred at a perfectly reasonable age, or taking Bruce out in an accident during say his 30's or 40's. Sorry, I was a rush transcribing my ideas.

Also, yes perhaps, I shouldn't have used the Batman mythos, it could have worked well with a self created one.


It only works with an already established mythos. If you're a writer don't let a few people who misunderstand your idea stop you, half of writing is being stubborn about your idea being brilliant, and as a comic fan myself, I'd pick this up as a one shot.

My favorite DC comic is Superman:Red Son, a non canon story about Superman landing in Russia instead of Smallville, this also reminds me of Marvel's Noir series, where the X-Men are sociopaths trained to be gangsters instead of mutants trained to be heroes.
Due what you want as long as you vote Due!
Last edited by tayroar at Apr 26, 2011,
#15
Quote by kaptink
the idea of batman as an urban legend is interesting, but I think it needs work. Why should readers be interested in a protagonist who has never appeared in this series before and isn't really that special?


I was thinking of doing a relatively complex back story, focusing on how he came to love Batman. I wanted to show how the protagonist is very much like the reader, as he using the real life Batman as form of escapism and comfort, like they use comic. He collects newspaper clipping attempted to meet Batman, in a way eerily similar to obsessive comic book fans.

Your point is valid though, but I think the concept is interesting.

And I was thinking if there was a good way of linking the boy to Robin some way.
Last edited by Acidshred at Apr 26, 2011,
#16
Quote by Acidshred
I was thinking of doing a relatively complex back story, focusing on how he came to love Batman. I wanted to show how the protagonist is very much like the reader, as he using the real life Batman as form of escapism and comfort, like they use comic. He collects newspaper clipping attempted to meet Batman, in a way eerily similar to obsessive comic book fans.

Your point is valid though, but I think the concept is interesting.

And I was thinking if there was a good way of linking the boy to Robin some way.


Make him an orphan boy. It'd be interesting to see all the supervillains live better lives with batman as a benefactor instead of a hero, but this boy didn't get the father figure he craved.
Due what you want as long as you vote Due!
#17
Quote by tayroar
I like it as a one shot, people in this thread don't understand alternate universes, and their popularity in comics. It'd be pretty fun just to see it done, especially if the boy was Tim Drake. Maybe just explore how Gotham City would have been had followed in his father's footsteps as a benevolent rich man instead of a martial artist.


It only works with an already established mythos. If you're a writer don't let a few people who misunderstand your idea stop you, half of writing is being stubborn about your idea being brilliant, and as a comic fan myself, I'd pick this up as a one shot.

My favorite DC comic is Superman:Red Son, a non canon story about Superman landing in Russia instead of Smallville, this also reminds me of Marvel's Noir series, where the X-Men are sociopaths trained to be gangsters instead of mutants trained to be heroes.

You seem to be misunderstanding the criticisms. Alfred being involved just didn't make sense with the original story posted. It's not the idea of a one-shot that's illogical, just the aspect of Alfred being there.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
Last edited by DaddyTwoFoot at Apr 26, 2011,
#18
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
You seem to be misunderstanding the criticisms. Alfred being involved just didn't make sense with the original story posted. It's not the idea of a one-shot that's illogical, just the aspect of Alfred being there.


I only saw a few Alfred still alive criticisms, which is a legitimate criticism, most of them I was referring to was. "No one wants to read about Batman not being real" which people definitely would, there's a whole Marvel series called "What If" that deals with premises like this. Even so, I came in after he said Batman died in a plane crash which is more than reasonable for Alfred to outlive him after that.
Due what you want as long as you vote Due!
#19
Well, what do you suggest instead?

A: Incorporating Bruce Wayne dying young into this one shot, so Alfred can be expected to be still be alive.
B: Using another DC character instead.
#20
Quote by Acidshred
Well, what do you suggest instead?

A: Incorporating Bruce Wayne dying young into this one shot, so Alfred can be expected to be still be alive.
B: Using another DC character instead.


It works great with Batman, especially with his rogue gallery in particular. I like the suggestion the Gotham doesn't need Batman after all, and a white knight Bruce would have been better. It'd be fun to have Crane as a psychiatrist who talks to the boy, and most of the supervillains living successful lives somehow, and if the JLA exists, maybe have them missing a crucial part of their team. Just think about how many lives Bruce Wayne touched donning the cowl.
Due what you want as long as you vote Due!
#21
I asked this question earlier and it hasn't been answered from what I saw: Does everyone find out that Bruce Wayne is Batman after he dies? How do they find out?
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#22
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
I asked this question earlier and it hasn't been answered from what I saw: Does everyone find out that Bruce Wayne is Batman after he dies? How do they find out?


From my understanding of it Bruce Wayne is dead and it's revealed that Batman never was, either that or the Bruce Wayne dying is unrelated to some documentary about Batman being a myth.

Maybe I misunderstand the story, but I like it, there are always a few wrinkles in an early idea, but if you work them out it could make one of his famous stories.
Due what you want as long as you vote Due!
#24
you suck at plots.
THE SOLE PURPOSE OF THIS SIG IS TO GRAB YOUR ATTENTION TO THIS POST OF UTTER GENIUS
#25
Quote by tayroar
From my understanding of it Bruce Wayne is dead and it's revealed that Batman never was, either that or the Bruce Wayne dying is unrelated to some documentary about Batman being a myth.

Maybe I misunderstand the story, but I like it, there are always a few wrinkles in an early idea, but if you work them out it could make one of his famous stories.

"Bruce Wayne has dies in a private jet crash. The media runs stories about how The Batman, a vigilante Bruce used to embody, was one of the greatest urban myths of all time, comparing him to the Loch Ness monster. A figurehead built up from legend and encouraged by a sensationalist media, and mask for Bruce Wayne’s charitable activities. Vigilantes may still adopt his face, but the “real” batman never existed.

It's kind of confusingly worded and I'm not sure how the people of Gotham see Batman or Bruce Wayne, TS. Can their views be clarified?
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#26
Quote by Grimriffer
you suck at plots.


Man I hate this. Offer constructive criticism, don't just put him down. This is why you shouldn't ask for reassurance on the internet though. People are unnecessarily dicks online. This isn't really even a plot pitch but more of a concept pitch.
Due what you want as long as you vote Due!
#27
i'm putting it out there that i like the concept.

maybe to alleviate some of the problems with it being Alfred and allowing Bruce Wayne to be older and Gotham further removed from the origins of the myth of Batman, make the guy at the end James Gordon instead.
#28
Quote by uhh_me?
i'm putting it out there that i like the concept.

maybe to alleviate some of the problems with it being Alfred and allowing Bruce Wayne to be older and Gotham further removed from the origins of the myth of Batman, make the guy at the end James Gordon instead.


That could be cool, Bruce Wayne doesn't even necessarily need to be dead either for the concept to work. If you want to make a Robin connection you could have him see a like Myth of Batman documentary similar to Bigfoot documentaries and have him be an orphan escaping his parent's death through a Batman he believes in, and at the end Bruce adopts the boy.
Due what you want as long as you vote Due!
#29
I thought this was a very good idea and liked it a lot. Maybe just work out the kinks a bit more and perhaps have the 'fatherless boy' be an actual character from the DC universe. It was a good concept though.