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#1
Hello,
I'm new to guitar playing (I've beeen playing for 10 weeks actually); and I started with a classic guitar (paid 45€, so it couldn't be that cool)...but I'm aiming to play mostly metal/rock music, so I'm looking forward to buy an electric guitar this summer.

The problem is that I don't know much about it; how to choose one, which "parts" are more important (I mean, which parts do you check the quality of first); which ampli for which guitar and so on.

So, if please someone would be so patient to explain me about this stuff, it'll be very welcome.

Thanks and sorry for bad english
#2
What kinds of music do you plan on playing? Rock, metal, blues, other? A lot of other info is needed but this is a good start.
#3
All the parts are very important, but the most important are probably the pickups. These are what send the sound the guitar string is making to the amp. But still don't forget about the other parts. There are two types of pickups - active and passive. Active is battery powered and passive uses the power of the amp. I personally like the sound of passive pickups better.

There are also 2 types of amps - solid state and tube. The difference between these is like the difference between digital and analog. Tube amps are more expensive but in my opinion sound better. Solid state is found in every price range. To start out I would get at least a 30 watt amplifier for solid state or at least 10 watts for tube.

If you want to play rock and metal then you need equipment made for rock and metal. Some brands I would check out are Ibanez, EMG, and Jackson. For an amp I would check out Randall, Marshall, Peavey, and Line 6. Do not buy a new guitar or amp for under $200 (140 euros) because they are generally a waste of money. You may also want to consider getting a or a few effects pedals to get some awesome sound. But in the end my advice is to go to the music store and try a guitar paired with an amp and buy what sounds best to you.
#4
@Skullivan: Actually I plan to play rock and Metal..maybe something like Judas Priest, Slipknot, ACDC, Pantera, Guns'n Roses.
What are the other infos needed?

@Guitarhead37: thanks for your explanation
So pickups change mostly the sound of a guitar?
I mean, it's possible make a guitar sound like another one just using the same pickup?

About the amps, the idea was to buy directly a very good one, so, as You said, I'll not waste money.
I think I'll have about 900/1300 € to buy both the guitar and the amp.

You mentioned pedals too..I saw some, but I don't really take what they're used for.
Ok, they can change the sound, but are there some must have ones; or they're all just an extra?

Thanks for helping
Last edited by Michele_R at Apr 26, 2011,
#5
How much are you willing to spend?
Quote by Boonnoo666
Another factor that has grown this myth is a bunch of opinionated guys who really don't know what they're talking about, which to be brutally honest is a bunch of you guys on here.
#6
Things to look for in guitars? There's quite a lot of them, but here's the basics i find.

First of all (and the most important) factor is how well the guitar plays. Do you like how the guitar feels when you hold it and do you find playing it comfortable?

Do you like how the neck feels in your hands? Do you like how the frets feel? With cheap guitars, somtimes the frets (the metal bars that go across the fingerboard) are sharp and you can somtimes even cut your fingers on the sharp edges. You don't want that of course, so feel that the edges of the frets are smooth.

How low are the strings off the fingerboard? This is called the guitars action.
The lower the action is, the easier the guitar is to play, but you may get a phenomenon called fret buzz. Basically what that is, when you fret a note, the frets infront of the fretted note may rattle against the string, causing the note to choke out and sound dead. You want to avoid this. You want a guitar that has the lowest action possible, with minimum fret buzz. If you get such a guitar, the axe will have the potential to play a lot faster and be a lot easier and more enjoyable to play.

Do you like how the guitar sounds? If you are interested in rock/metal, i would recommend getting a guitar with pickups called 'humbuckers'. I won't go into why, but basically these pickups are higher output, have a thicker sound and are less noisy. This will allow you to have a more overdriven, thick rythm sound with the added bonus of the pickups being less noisy. They are a lot better suited to rock and especially metal than 'single coil' pickups.

EDIT: Pedals are all optional extras. Pedals are often used by guitarists who want a certain effect, such as distortion, a reverb, a phaser, flanger etc. Pedals aren't essential to get started. Most modelling amps already have built-in effects anyway. Things such as distortion (often known as 'lead' channels on amps) and other effects such as reverb, flanger and phaser effects.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Apr 26, 2011,
#7
For a first guitar, you should be looking at a cheapish guitar and possibly a modeling amp.

Pickups aren't too important in a starter guitar, but if at all possible go for a humbucker-single coil-single coil (HSS) from bridge to neck. That configuration is the most versatile that you'll be able to find, and beginners tend to change playing styles often so versatility is a good thing.
You'll be able to tell a humbucker from a single coil - a humbucker looks like two single coils taped together most of the time.

As for actually choosing a guitar, go to the nearest Guitar Center/Sam Ash and just pick all guitars up within your budget. Play a few chords unplugged, then plug into the amp you're looking to get and again, play a few chords.

In a starter guitar, the single most important factor is a playable neck - check if it's smooth and the frets are cut off properly. They shouldn't stick out of the sides, and there should be almost no room below the metal fret wire.

The single tip I can give you is to AVOID EVERYTHING THAT HAS A LOCKING NUT. In a starter guitar, difficulty restringing and tuning is the one thing you don't want.

Also, don't believe the anti-Line 6 bandwagon - they're good for beginners that don't have a trained ear yet, but there are better options (Peavey Vypyr, Fender Mustang series amplifiers).

I'm not going to give you any specific guitars to buy since everyone will have different tastes in them - the best thing you can do is go to Guitar Center (or any other large instrument store) and play as many of them as possible.

The ideal set of gear will probably cost you around 500 dollars, so you should save up about that much.

Getting a pre-collected starterpack from Squier/Epiphone/Ibanez/what-have-you is rarely worth it - either the guitar or the amp will be crap, and you'll want both to be at least decent.
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Last edited by PsiGuy60 at Apr 26, 2011,
#8
Thanks for the advices.

@Strat007: I think the budget will be between 900/1300 € for both guitar and amp (and eventually pedals or stuff like that)

@T00DEEPBLUE: thanks for explaining me so well
I'll pay attention to the neck...I suppose it can be damn annoying.

I didn't understand (sorry for my bad english) if it's better when the strings are really low on the frets, or when they're high.
I guess when they're low but..

@PsiGuy60: ok..so you think it's not a good idea to buy directly a pretty good guitar (which I hope to get with the budget I have); but it's better to take a beginner one?
#10
Quote by Michele_R

@T00DEEPBLUE: thanks for explaining me so well
I'll pay attention to the neck...I suppose it can be damn annoying.

I didn't understand (sorry for my bad english) if it's better when the strings are really low on the frets, or when they're high.
I guess when they're low but..


Thanks for your kind words. I'm glad that what i said made sense.

You want the string action to be low. The guitar will be a lot easier to play. But having lower action can cause more fret buzz. You need to find a guitar that has a fine balance between low action and little fret buzz. Having high action will make the guitar hard to play and learn on.

Experiment with as many guitars as possible that you like the look of. If the action on the guitar is high, that CAN be adjusted. But somtimes guitar manufacturers set up their guitars with high action to hide the fact that the guitar has lots of fret buzz, as fret buzz is less with high action.
You need to watch out for that if you want the best playing guitar possible.

If you find a guitar you like the look of, that is comfortable, with low action and little fret buzz and sounds great, that is probably the right guitar for you.
Roses are red
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Omae wa mou
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Apr 27, 2011,
#11
Guitar:

If you'll really make a commitment to it, go ahead and knock yourself out. Cheap gear will only discourage you from playing.

As T00DEEPBLUE said, you want something with low action, but not so low that it buzzes. However, electric guitars are very adjustable. If you find a guitar that you like, but it has high action, don't be afraid to ask the guitar shop guy to adjust it. For rock and metal, get a guitar with humbuckers, which sound fatter, bigger, and thicker than single-coils. You can get HSS guitars, which have a humbucker in the bridge for AC/DC, G&R, and so on, and single coils in the neck and bridge position for Hendrix, SRV, Clapton,etc. There's also something called a coil split, which lets you use only one coil of a humbucker, essentially transforming it into a single coil.

Do you want a whammy bar? The whammy bar system on most Strats is fine for moderate vibrato. If you plan on doing a lot of whammy bar work, consider a guitar with a Floyd Rose bridge. However, changing strings on a Floyd Rose is a pain in the ass.

A couple of suggestions are the Gibson SG Standard (excellent for AC/DC and G&R)

Fender American Standard Stratocaster HSS (Has one humbucker and two single-coils; very versatile)


Amplifier:

I would suggest you go ahead and get a good tube amp. They're a little heavier and more expensive, but the sound is worth it. Take a look at the Blackstar HT-20.

Do you have any idea how you want it to sound?
Quote by Boonnoo666
Another factor that has grown this myth is a bunch of opinionated guys who really don't know what they're talking about, which to be brutally honest is a bunch of you guys on here.
#12
with that budget, I'd get maybe a roland cube 30x or peavey vypyr for the amp.

Maybe an ibanez rg1451 or one of those new charvel pro-mods.

Philosophy being:

- those amps are fairly cheap, but are very versatile, being modelling amps. They're also more aimed at hard rock and metal tones. They'll let you see what type of amp tones you like before forking out for a kickass tube amp- without cutting too much into the budget.

- If you know you're going to stick with it, it's worth buying a good guitar- both those guitars are good enough that you should never really grow out of them (they're both made in japan, and japanese-made guitars are generally really well-made, and also good value), but again you're not blowing your whole budget before you really know what you want... and also they're pretty versatile to cope with a range of tones (again, in case you change your mind regarding what stuff you mainly play).

EDIT: you don't even have to spend that much on the guitar. I was just making a suggestion. Even guitars around the 400-500 euro mark, if you know what you're doing, should be pretty good and good enough that they won't hold you back.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#13

If you find a guitar you like the look of, that is comfortable, with low action and little fret buzz and sounds great, that is probably the right guitar for you


Ok, I'll try to find something like that
And thanks for the explanation you gave.

@Strat007: wait wait...what is vibrato?
What's the difference between floyd rose bridge and normal one? Sorry but about electric guitars I'm a complete beginner.

About the sound, no ideas so far. Maybe something more similar to pantera than GNR; if this can make some sence.

The guitar Dave adviced looks good..but I think I need to try a lot before knowing enought to choose the right one.

About amp, should look after a tube one than?

Amps are "standard" or they're built for specific guitars?

Another question..is the distance between the strings standard? It may look silly, but I think it would be a problem for me if the strings are too near.
#14
Quote by Michele_R

(a) @Strat007: wait wait...what is vibrato?
(b) What's the difference between floyd rose bridge and normal one? Sorry but about electric guitars I'm a complete beginner.

(c) About the sound, no ideas so far. Maybe something more similar to pantera than GNR; if this can make some sence.

(d) The guitar Dave adviced looks good..but I think I need to try a lot before knowing enought to choose the right one.

(e) About amp, should look after a tube one than?

(f) Amps are "standard" or they're built for specific guitars?

(g) Another question..is the distance between the strings standard? It may look silly, but I think it would be a problem for me if the strings are too near.


(a) raising and lowering the pitch of the note.

(b) a floyd rose locks the strings at both the bridge and and nut with clamps. This supposedly keeps the guitar in tune even with extreme whammy bar usage. However, this is only half the story- it's true if your guitar has a high quality floyd rose... not so true if it has a cheaper one. For that reason, I personally think you should only get a floyd rose-style bridge if you can afford a decent quality one. The one on the charvels I suggested is reasonably good (it's a korean-made version of an Original Floyd Rose, it's not quite as good as the German/Schaller-made ones, but it's not bad. Plus it's a direct swap, as far as i'm aware, for the German/Schaller-made one, so you can upgrade later if you need to).

(c) Ok, cool. The roland cube 30x should work for that. I haven't tried the peavey vypyr, but I think it should, too.

(d) no worries, of course you should do that.

(e) If you're after a pantera-type of tone it's probably easier to get that with a solid state or modeller. Certainly without forking out a ton of money.

(f) nah they're pretty much standard (as long as you don't mean things like acoustic guitar amps etc.). Some amps will sound better with different types of guitar, and some amps are better than others, but all electric guitar amps will "work" with all electric guitars, kind of thing.

(g) nah that can vary. Normally you have two choices- most guitars have either a 43mm (1 11/16") nut width or 1 5/8" (41.5mm?). Depending on how they've been measured (some factories use metric and some use imperial), they can be 42mm or 42.5mm. And occasionally the odd guitar can be smaller or bigger than those two measurements (e.g. 40mm or 45mm), but it's rare.

Other things can affect how the neck feels, too- the fretboard radius (how curved the fretboard surface is- a bigger measurement means less curve), the size of the frets, the scale length (basically how long the neck is, which affects the tension of the strings), and also the neck shape/profile (basically the shape of the neck round the back, the bit that your left-hand palm is in contact with when playing).
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#15
Quote by Michele_R
Ok, @Strat007: wait wait...what is vibrato?
What's the difference between floyd rose bridge and normal one? Sorry but about electric guitars I'm a complete beginner.


Vibrato is basically a fancy musical term for bending a string or using a tremolo to loosen ar tighten the strings to adjust the pitch of a note. That's all it means.

The difference between a fixed bridge and a Floyd Rose would take a lengthy explination, so to save loads of time, i will just give you these links. They will explian everything.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridge_(instrument)
(look under 'Electric Guitar Bridges' in the link)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floyd_Rose
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Shindeiru



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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Apr 29, 2011,
#16
dude i would only suggest electric , only if you have already spent 2-3 years on acoustic guitar.
its like the hard guitar and if you can play well on accoustic . ( i mean even rock and metal and blues) that too clear . You are ready to move on to electric

Because electric gives lot of sustain .

Just my 2 cents , ( its like hitting rock with punches before you start your kung fu training ) :P
#17
Quote by anonymusneo
dude i would only suggest electric , only if you have already spent 2-3 years on acoustic guitar.
its like the hard guitar and if you can play well on accoustic . ( i mean even rock and metal and blues) that too clear . You are ready to move on to electric

Because electric gives lot of sustain .

Just my 2 cents , ( its like hitting rock with punches before you start your kung fu training ) :P


I refuse to believe that electric guitar is inherently harder than acoustic. It depends on what you do with it. Playing <insert classical guitar piece here> on an acoustic is just as hard if not harder than shredding on an electric guitar, in my opinion.

Ontopic:

For the budget, I'd suggest getting a Fender Highway 1 and any good tube amp you can find. They're really versatile, and good for learning on as well as intermediate playing.

The tube amp may be heavier, but the sound is absolutely worth it when compared to a transistor amp.

Your first guitar being 45 euros gave me the impression of being a piss-poor student, so I reccommended you get something decently cheap.
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#18
wut?

if you want to play electric, get an electric.

if you want to play acoustic, get an acoustic.

Simple.

If someone wants to learn to drive a car you don't tell them to start on a motorbike. Or if someone wants to learn to play tennis you don't make them start with table tennis.

Because that would be crazy.



Life's short enough without wasting a bunch of it doing something you don't really want to do in some misguided attempt to make yourself feel like you "deserve" it more...
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Apr 29, 2011,
#19
If I may piggy-back off of Michele's questions: I'm new to the electric guitar market as well, and I just want to clarify; with regard to amp size, a 10W would be good for practice, but I'd want something bigger for live gigs, correct?
#20
Quote by PsiGuy60
I refuse to believe that electric guitar is inherently harder than acoustic. It depends on what you do with it. Playing <insert classical guitar piece here> on an acoustic is just as hard if not harder than shredding on an electric guitar, in my opinion.


i think maybe i wrote worngor you misundersttood me :P acoustic is more harder then electric


on topic :
um yea and try the Cort series you might like em
#21
Quote by ibanezjoey1007
If I may piggy-back off of Michele's questions: I'm new to the electric guitar market as well, and I just want to clarify; with regard to amp size, a 10W would be good for practice, but I'd want something bigger for live gigs, correct?


yeah pretty much
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#22
Michele_R, be sure to post pics of what u get. I'm curious as to what you buy.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
#24
Ok, so I think the next month I'll have a guitar (not sure about the amp..have to see how much does the guitar cost ).

I asked some advice from my teacher, who said in his opinion the best for me would be 2 single coil pickups and a humbucker.
And to NOT chose a guitar with the tremolo sistem (I hope that's the correct name)-which I don't like btw.

But I saw this, what kind of pickups are these?



And, if I would choose a les paul, I know they're more expensive than ibanez or fender, is it true? How much would cost a good les paul?
Would it be good to do all kind of metal or just zakk wylde style?

Sorry if theese are stupid questions, but I don't know much about electric guitars.

Thanks in advance
#25
Those are two humbuckers man. To get a Zakk signature model would be very expensive, so you'd be better off looking at Ibanez, Washburn and Squier, all who make great guitars for an entry level price. But that there guitar would be good for any metal.
#26
Those are EMG pickups. They're humbuckers, and they're active. That means that they have a battery powered pre-amp built in, which boosts the signal.

People will argue about whether active pickups are better than passive or not, and of course there's no definitive answer. General opinions will tell you that passive pickups are warmer and more dynamic, and that actives can sound a bit sterile, but are great for high gain.

Getting an HSS layout guitar (one humbucker and two singles) is good for a first guitar because it's very versatile. You can get 'fatter' tones from the humbucker and 'twangier' tones from the single coils. Basically, an HSS guitar can play just about anything.

There are good reasons people usually advise beginners to stay away from Floyd Rose systems. The Floyd Roses that come on cheaper guitars that beginners usually buy are rubbish and fall out of tune far more than they should. But, you've got a better budget so you wouldn't have that problem.

The main problem is that they can be a pain in the ass until you're used to setting them up. Restringing and retuning take longer with a Floyd, and they can be frustrating processes if you're not sure how to do it properly. If you're just starting, you might want to experiment with different tunings, and the Floyd Rose makes it more difficult for you to do that.

It is true that Les Pauls can be more expensive than other guitars of equivalent quality. Gibson always intended for them to be a 'premium' product, and these days they're so legendary that Gibson can get away with charging a lot more for them than they should.

The Epiphone line are better priced, but they're also not as good as the Gibsons. They're essentially Gibson's cheap models, that they didn't want to use the Gibson name for. I wouldn't get that Zakk model that you posted, because signature models are generally overpriced. You're paying for the artist's name.

Les Pauls in general can play metal very well. They've got a chunky body which provides a great tone, and they're very popular among metal rhythm players in particular for the beefy tone that they can give to riffs. They can also sound great for leads too, but their drawback there is that they have poor upper fret access, so it can be difficult to get to the really high notes.
#27
Assuming you know the parts of an acoustic guitar, I'll explain the electric guitar parts basically.

- Pickups. They "pick up" the vibrations of the metal strings, using magnets, and send the signal to the amplifier. The pickups are the rectangle things under the strings on the body

* Single coil pickups are the thin ones. They sound bright and twangy
* Humbucker are essentially 2 single coils that share one set of magnets. You get a fatter sound and higher output.


- Pickup selector switch. Does what it says on the tin - chooses which pickup is to be used. Using the neck pickup will give you a more rounded tone, the bridge pickup gives a more harsher tone and the middle pickup will be somewhere in between
- Volume and tone knobs control the volume and tone. they both do what they say on the tin
- Output jack. Just plug the lead in hear and connect it to an amplifier

Along with a guitar, you will need an amplifier to get some sound out of it.
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#28
A good electric guitar to begin with and that is easy to play with two Humbucker pick-ups is the Cort X 6 VPR series or even the EVL series.The X series is more fun and better to play with.Cort is a good and good priced guitar...about 360 Euro's for the X6 VPR series of cort.
www.cortguitars.com
#29
Quote by Michele_R

(a) I asked some advice from my teacher, who said in his opinion the best for me would be 2 single coil pickups and a humbucker.
And to NOT chose a guitar with the tremolo sistem (I hope that's the correct name)-which I don't like btw.

But I saw this, what kind of pickups are these?



(c) And, if I would choose a les paul, I know they're more expensive than ibanez or fender, is it true? How much would cost a good les paul?
Would it be good to do all kind of metal or just zakk wylde style?

(d) Sorry if theese are stupid questions, but I don't know much about electric guitars.

Thanks in advance


(a) I'm guessing he means to avoid double locking tremolos... because the vast majority of HSS (humbucker and two singles) guitars will have a tremolo of some sort, albeit not locking in a lot of cases.

FWIW I'd agree with going HSS for versatility unless you desperately need the neck humbucker tone.

Yamaha pacifica 112v would work well. EDIT: oh if you have 900 euro you can do a lot better than a 112

(b) they're emgs. they're just humbuckers with a black cover.

(c) well, in my opinion, les pauls start getting good when you start hitting the price range of the cheapest japanese-made copies- e.g. the tokai ls80. Which is around the £600 mark, at the current exchange rate (the yen's very strong at the moment, unfortunately).

Things like the better epiphones would be fine too, e.g. the epiphone les paul standard. they're around the £300-£400 mark. (though the japanese tokais are noticeably better)

Again, in my opinion, I wouldn't buy a les paul for metal- the tone is very thick and warm, which works really well for classic rock and hard rock, but things can get a bit mushy/muddy for metal.

(d) there are no stupid questions, don't worry.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Jun 12, 2011,
#30
Tbh, a Yamaha Pacifica 112v with upgraded pickups would be a good option. If you wanted to you could hold off on pickups and get a nicer amp. If you do want two humbuckers, the 112H might be worth a look when that comes out.

Alternatively, look at something like an Ibanez RG1451 Which has 2 humbuckers and a single coil - the best of both worlds!

Btw, a 5 watt tube amp should be plenty loud enough if you only want to do bedroom practice.

*Important* The Amp should cost more (is more important) than the guitar
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#31
Thanks for all the advices

I think that I'll go for the RG1451, if I choose an Ibanez (what prolly I'll).
Just another question, I saw I can activate only some of the pickups on the RG, the "quality" of the sound depends by the pickups I use?
For example, if I want to have a clean sound I have to choose the single coil and for some slipknot riff (for example) It's better if I choose the humbuckers?
Another thing, I saw (here http://www.ibanez.com/ElectricGuitars/model-RG1451) that I can't activate both the humbuckers at the same time, which you can do on other guitars, is it a negative thing?

Thanks
#32
I wouldn't worry about it, a 5 way selector switch means it's going to be versatile.
No, it's not a negative thing. It will sound different, not better or worse, just different. In fact that setup is going to be more sensible with a HSH guitar.
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#33
if you are intrested in a new, first guitar I would say go to a store like guitar center or sam ash and try out every guitar. The one that feels and sounds best will be the one you want to get. Guitar Center and Sam Ash usually let you play every guitar and every amp so you will have a lot of options. For metal your probably gonna want a thin neck, Epiphone is a good brand for beginners. I would recomend an Epiphone les paul standard, which is around $400. Dont just take my word for it though, thats my opinion, you really have to try out all of the guitars before you can decide.
#34
yeah it's just one of those things, you get some advantages of HSH and some disadvantages... the advantages are that you can get single-coil type tones too, the disadvantages are you can't get the both-pickups-on tone you can get with a gibson.

It just depends on which tones you need more.

and yeah for cleans you'd generally use one of the single coil tones (i.e. one of the middle 3 positions of the switch), and for heavy distortion you'd probably use the bridge humbucker. Of course, you can use whichever position you like, lots of people like humbucker tones for cleans too.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
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#35
Thanks for the advices and explanations

By the way, I checked on the internet for other kind of guitars, what if I look for some Jackson guitar? or maybe parker?

Are theese good?
#36
what models are you looking at? with most of the bigger brands it depends more on model than brand. a lot of the time they're made in the same factories, lol.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#37
Quote by Michele_R
Thanks for the advices and explanations

By the way, I checked on the internet for other kind of guitars, what if I look for some Jackson guitar? or maybe parker?

Are theese good?


It entirely depends on the model you're looking at. You cannot generalise a company just by looking at one guitar.

I've played many Jacksons at a variety of different procepoints and i've generally really liked them. The cheap ones are a bit iffy which is to be expected. But their Pro series or higher are fantastic. It depends on the specific guitar you're looking at though, as no two guitars (even of the same model) ever feel and sound exactly the same.

A lot of Jacksons have locking Floyd Rose tremolo systems. Not all of them, but a lot of their models do. If you want a Jackson, make sure it's a fixed bridge, as Floyd Roses can be a pain in the ass for beginners.

I havn't had any experiences with Parker, so i really couldn't say. Sorry.
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#38
yeah pretty much the pro series or higher (which are Japanese-made) are great. Though I don't much like the jt580LP trem which is on the cheaper japanese jacksons.

But yeah there are a couple of hardtail options too, the dkmgt and dk2t.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#39
Quote by Dave_Mc
yeah pretty much the pro series or higher (which are Japanese-made) are great. Though I don't much like the jt580LP trem which is on the cheaper japanese jacksons.

But yeah there are a couple of hardtail options too, the dkmgt and dk2t.


At least the liscenced floyds that Jackson does fully supports the OFR. I think you can replace the baseplate on their units for an OFR one.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



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#40
not sure about the baseplate (not saying you're wrong, just saying I don't know), but i've definitely read they're a direct swap for an OFR.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
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