#1
I like
Albert king
Bb king
Hendrix
Clap
Srv


I love wht
They
Do and how they make me feel. I hear the words tension and release get thrown around. Any
Examples?
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal
#2
Tension and release is a lot like the plot of a story. You build up suspense (tension), and then when "everyone lives happily ever after" (release), it all make sense and everything is justified.

That is my explanation of what tension and release is, but it obviously has nothing to do with how you create tension, and then release.
It helps if you know music theory, do you?
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
#3
Play a wrong note or scale to build tension, grab the listener.. then play a real kick-ass melodic lick to release. Thats my version. Sorry if it doesnt help.
ESP LTD m400
Peavey Vypyr 30 w/ Sanpera I
Dunlop Crybaby Wah pedal
ISP Decimator

"Dream big, and dare to fail. I dare you to do that." - James Hetfield, HoF Speech, 09
#4
moving upward creates tension (moving back down releases tension), especially if you hit notes that ready your ear for the root and then choose a different note in its place (perferably not a note found in the major7 chord created from the root note).

a minor second creates a large amount of tension (think of Jaws), a trill between the 3 and 4 of a scale is a great way to do this, since you don't hit the root which typically releases all tension (however moving between the 7 and the root also tends to create alot of tension, I just personally feel more tension when playing the 3 and 4).

a flatted fifth is another way to create tension so moving from the 7 to the 4 creates a large amount of tension. accidentals also help to create tension.

the best way to relieve tension is to bring the listener back to the most stable note of all, the root. however it's not the only way, I feel that figuring what other things you can do on your own is more helpful than getting a list.

there are hundreds of ways to create and release tension and none of these work 100% of the time, they are just the ones that I think of right away.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#5
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
Tension and release is a lot like the plot of a story. You build up suspense (tension), and then when "everyone lives happily ever after" (release), it all make sense and everything is justified.

That is my explanation of what tension and release is, but it obviously has nothing to do with how you create tension, and then release.
It helps if you know music theory, do you?



I know basic chord structure. Progressions. Blues pent. Modes etc basic stuff
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal
#6
surprisingly this hasent been said but volume control helps alot like if you fade out of a song or suddenly go from slow to fast if you raise and lower volume at the rite times it can build tension and release it
#7
Quote by krypticguitar87
moving upward creates tension (moving back down releases tension), especially if you hit notes that ready your ear for the root and then choose a different note in its place (perferably not a note found in the major7 chord created from the root note).

a minor second creates a large amount of tension (think of Jaws), a trill between the 3 and 4 of a scale is a great way to do this, since you don't hit the root which typically releases all tension (however moving between the 7 and the root also tends to create alot of tension, I just personally feel more tension when playing the 3 and 4).

a flatted fifth is another way to create tension so moving from the 7 to the 4 creates a large amount of tension. accidentals also help to create tension.

the best way to relieve tension is to bring the listener back to the most stable note of all, the root. however it's not the only way, I feel that figuring what other things you can do on your own is more helpful than getting a list.

there are hundreds of ways to create and release tension and none of these work 100% of the time, they are just the ones that I think of right away.


Ty very much for the info. Ya i love blues. More so hendrix and albrt king. They really tickle my ear. I working releaseing to root. To get used to it. I understsnd good tention is going then going back down too. Thnx
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal
#8
honestly creating tension and release is a bit easier to understand when working with chords, because it is more promenent, at least it always has been for me....

also listen to songs with alot of tension, then learn how to play a few of them, and figure out how they created the tension, it's more helpful than you think.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#9
The first solo in Hotel California is a classic example, if you analyze it you'll here all these semitone shifts and overbent notes that make things feel slightly uncomfortable and awkward. It also occasionally dwells on those notes for a little too long when you're ear is expecting things to resolve. The second solo provides a contrast, as that's far more harmonically stable.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#11
Perfect example is the opening of "Purple Haze"

Jimi is playing Bb on the low E string to Bb on the D string (he was tuned down on the studio recording, I believe, I can't remember .. but let's say it was Bb) while Noel plucked an E -- that creates a "tritone" or diminished 5th interval -- lotta tension.

When Jimi slides into is E blues riff, it resolves.

All blues musicians will add tension on the turnaround .. so they are coming back to the I chord in a I - IV - V progression. Suppose you are playing an E blues -- play a B7 for the V chord, when you get back to the E (minor or 7, usually) there is a release. Blues players will tease with this by adding notes to the V chord -- so extension like B7#9, B13 will add tension. Coming back to the I chord a lot of songs add a quick move to an extended V chord on the last bar of a 12 bar blues.

So you will hear:

|| E7 | A7 | E7 | E7 |
| A7 | A7 | E7 | E7 |
| B7 | A7 | E7 | B7 ||