When it comes to album liner notes- What do "Engineered by" and "Assisted by" mean?

#1
Hey everyone. I'm quite new to the world of audio engineering. I know very little about sound recording and mixing outside of a few Wikipedia articles. So I was hoping if I could gain some knowledge from any of you studio experts here.

As a rock music fan, I've collected many U2 albums over the years. Sometimes I find myself reading through the liner notes inside the inner sleeve of every U2 album.

In several of these liner notes, I'd often come across the phrase "Engineered by". Also, when the phrase "Engineered by" is used, the phrase "Recorded by" would not be included.

Plus, I'd regularly see the phrase "Assisted by" immediately after the phrase "Engineered by" (or "Recorded by"), and immediately after the phrase "Mixed by".

What do the phrases "Engineered by" and "Assisted by" in all these liner notes refer to?

And why is the phrase "Recorded by" omitted when the phrase "Engineered by" is used?

For me, the phrases "Produced by", "Recorded by", and "Mixed by" are very obvious. But the phrases "Engineered by" and "Assisted by" are much too vague for me to understand.

Does "Engineered by" refer to the recording engineer? Does "Assisted by" refer to the assistant engineer for the recording and/or mixing engineer?

Can any experts here clear this up for me?
#2
An engineer is generally the same thing as a music producer. The term engineer refers to the person who is in charge of the album's sound. He works a large console with hundreds of buttons, knobs, and sliders on it that all can either subtly or drastically change the properties of the sound produced by the band or artist being recorded. They can also be in charge of micing up the drums and setting up the instruments and amps for the band.

As for the assistant, I would assume that would be the engineer's helper
#3
^I have to disagree with you slightly. The producer is still the one in charge of the record's sound. The engineer runs the board, as well as any outboard gear. You're correct on the mic set-up aspect, however.

A good example would be Alan Parsons on Dark Side Of The Moon. He was mostly an engineer on the record, but occasionally would contribute musical ideas, such as the clock chiming intro in "Time".
I can only listen to so many breakdowns and "spoken word" vocals before I wanna puke.

I find Jennette McCurdy attractive, but Elizabeth Gillies and Debby Ryan much more so.

That's enough, Djent people. We get it.
#4
Quote by chronic_stp
An engineer is generally the same thing as a music producer. The term engineer refers to the person who is in charge of the album's sound.


Steve Albini would like a word with you.

A producer has creative influence; an extreme example would be Phil Spector, who pioneered the 'wall of sound.' Many people can identify Spector produced albums pretty easily.

Engineers simply do technical work; they mic the instruments, operate the console, etc. For example, Steve Albini is the engineer that worked on Nirvana's In Utero. He had very little creative input on the album; most of his contribution was mixing.

Quote by Pat_s1t
I remember Das_Skittles made me rage hard.

Quote by WCPhils
I can't stand Das_Skittles everything he says makes me mad.

Quote by due 07
Skittles is the shit you cuntles. Slob on his knob.

My Band Youtube Channel Last.fm
#5
Watch a few episodes - even one episode - of this on-line show:

http://www.aux.tv/show/Master-Tracks/

Each episode (about 20 minutes) shows a band going "from demo to download" in a day, under the direction of two people:
-Moe Berg - producer
-Laurence Currie - engineer

Every now and again, you get to see the assistant at work too.

By watching the two of them at work, you really get to see what the difference is between a producer and engineer, and how they work together.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
"Engineered by" is essentially the same as "Recorded by". "Recorded by" sounds somewhat goofy and unprofessional to me. It makes me think, "Recorded by? That guy has an easy job." or something of the like.
..I was watching my death.
#8
Quote by timbit2006
"Engineered by" is essentially the same as "Recorded by". "Recorded by" sounds somewhat goofy and unprofessional to me. It makes me think, "Recorded by? That guy has an easy job." or something of the like.


Thanks for explaining that to me.

Can BOTH the recording engineer and the mixing engineer have an assistant engineer ("Assisted by") attending to them?
#9
sure, everyone can have an assistant if they want/need.
the recording engineer would have his assistant to help with setting up mics, setting levels, getting the eq on amplifiers right, etc.
the mixing engineer's assistant would be lending a second set of ears on the mix and offering a second perspective (among other things).

the producer's assistant gets the coffee, donuts, and other consumable substances
#10
Why do forum users put stupid quotes from threads into their signature template?
#11
Quote by dirtfoot
Why do forum users put stupid quotes from threads into their signature template?

Why do forum trolls try to start arguments?
If you have nothing to contribute, get the hell out of here.
..I was watching my death.
#12
Quote by dirtfoot
Why do forum users put stupid quotes from threads into their signature template?


Because it's fun... and because we can.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
Quote by timbit2006
Why do forum trolls try to start arguments?



CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.