#1
Right, so this topic is dealt with a lot, but after a lot searching I still didn't find a proper answer to my question.

A lot of people tell me to "learn scales". I'm not sure what this means. For example, the major scale: I can construct it, i.e. I know the intervals, but what exactly does mastering it means? Should I aim towards being able to play every major scale (For every key) fluently? How should I go about it?

The idea I have is that I should like memorize what the pattern looks like on the fretboard, and then learn to move it up and down depending on the key. It's easier said than done though, and I really have no idea if I'm right and if so, how to work towards it.

Cheers!
#2
Do you know the notes on the fretboard?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
The goal is to play music with it, simply as that. If you recognize the sound of a major scale, and can recreate that sound, in the context of the music, in whatever key you're in, then you mastered the scale.

Knowing patterns is not mastering a scale, it's just a way of organizing the notes throughout the neck.
#4
Quote by AlanHB
Do you know the notes on the fretboard?


Not very fluently, no. Should that be the first step?
#5
You should be comfortable using it across the fretboard, play a lick/melody on the lower frets and then move onto higher frets without thinking too long about it etc.
You should know the intervals in the scale, how to construct different diatonic chords and which notes produce which effects on the chords when soloing.
Which scale degrees function as tonic, subdominant, dominant, leading tone.
#6
What are your needs and goals Ahteh? I think whatever you do should be relevant to your goals and motivations for playing in the first place.

I see people tell others to "learn...xyz" but I think you have got to know what you want and by want, I don't mean generic goals like "I want to be great!" I mean DEFINE what it is to be GREAT by YOUR standards. When people come to me and say "I want to learn theory" Instead of saying "Great", I ask "Why?"

I always ask "why". Motivation and needs are so important in determining what is right for YOU.

I could tell you all day what I think is important, but I dont matter, I'm not playing your guitar, I'm not walking in your shoes. No one else here is either.

So, my question to you is, why?

Sean
#7
Quote by Ahteh
Not very fluently, no. Should that be the first step?



This might help :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ci6aTve_fAU


If you know how the strings are tuned -- E A D G B E and that each fret is a semitone ... it is REALLY helpful you run some exercises to get you used to the natural note names. 15 minutes a day for a week and you will know where all the natural notes are on the neck -- and then start to see where your major and minor scale shapes will fit naturally under your fingers.
#8
Quote by Ahteh
Not very fluently, no. Should that be the first step?


Yes, it should be one of the first steps. From there you should be able to use those major/minor scale creations you have there.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#9
Quote by Sean0913
What are your needs and goals Ahteh? I think whatever you do should be relevant to your goals and motivations for playing in the first place.

I see people tell others to "learn...xyz" but I think you have got to know what you want and by want, I don't mean generic goals like "I want to be great!" I mean DEFINE what it is to be GREAT by YOUR standards. When people come to me and say "I want to learn theory" Instead of saying "Great", I ask "Why?"

I always ask "why". Motivation and needs are so important in determining what is right for YOU.

I could tell you all day what I think is important, but I dont matter, I'm not playing your guitar, I'm not walking in your shoes. No one else here is either.

So, my question to you is, why?

Sean


I want to be able to compose my own stuff and improvise.
#10
scales are important because harmonic chord progressions are built on them. knowing scales will help you figure out the diatonic notes for the progression. knowing arpeggios is also important as it will let you reflect the harmony in your melodic lines. chord tones and guide tones are places of resolution knowing these in the context of the arpeggio and scale will help you resolve lines with tensions.
#11
Learn the entire fretboard.

For your goals you are going to NEED to know how to write and spell out every single Major Scale Correctly. Following that, you'll Want to learn how the Harmonized Major scale at least to 4 part harmony applies to Every Major Scale you've written. Then start studying cadences and experimenting, and apply each thing you learn to some sort of exercise, that allows you to get in and explore it, instead of mentally assenting to it.

Sean
#12