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#2
this'll be difficult...

what degree is the neapolitan 6th based on?

name the 3 sections of a standard sonata form.

what is the purpose of inversions?

what does a 6/4 inversion usually resolve to?

name three different types of modulation.

why do you insist on making threads?

what factors are in a german 6th?

briefly explain the melodic minor.
Last edited by gavk at Apr 27, 2011,
#3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GEo8IrU5MQk

At around 0:24 the intro melody is juxtaposed against the new main melody. Together, they create a certain stylistic effect, mostly only found in the more adventurous classical music. Name this effect.

Compose a four part harmony in D major of 16 bars with atleast one PAC and one deceptive cadence.

Write down a B# major scale in note names and on a staff.

What is the difference between a 3/4 and a 6/8 time signature?

How would you voice a i-N-V progression?
#4
I posed some questions to you in your last thread on this and you didn't even try to answer anything...

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#5
Quote by liampje
Hey all.
Just ask me questions about music theory and better me.


Name the Primary chords in C major and describe the function of each.
shred is gaudy music
#6
Quote by gavk
this'll be difficult...

what degree is the neapolitan 6th based on?

name the 3 sections of a standard sonata form.

what is the purpose of inversions?

what does a 6/4 inversion usually resolve to?

name three different types of modulation.

why do you insist on making threads?

what factors are in a german 6th?

briefly explain the melodic minor.

The neapolitan 6th is based on the flattened 7th degree forming one extra major chord and you can make another one by flattening the second of a major scale.

The purpose of inversions is making another bass note of a chord tone.
Such as an Cmaj triad CEG and then making G the lowest note is a second inversion.

You have direct modulation moving suddenly to another key, also chord mod is taking a chord that is in both scales and use that as pivot chord and finally the common tone mod, which is like playing in C major and then sustain a G maj chord for like a whole bar and then play in G major.

I like making threads lol.

Melodic minor is a natural minor scale with a raised 6th and seventh.

The questions I didn't answer are the ones I don't know the answer too.
#7
Quote by liampje
The neapolitan 6th is based on the flattened 7th degree forming one extra major chord and you can make another one by flattening the second of a major scale.

Not exactly...

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#8
Quote by Keth
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GEo8IrU5MQk

At around 0:24 the intro melody is juxtaposed against the new main melody. Together, they create a certain stylistic effect, mostly only found in the more adventurous classical music. Name this effect.

Compose a four part harmony in D major of 16 bars with atleast one PAC and one deceptive cadence.

Write down a B# major scale in note names and on a staff.

What is the difference between a 3/4 and a 6/8 time signature?

How would you voice a i-N-V progression?

I think that's a canon.

I will try to write it but not now maybe tommorow.

B# C# D# E# F# G# A#
I don't know how to write them digitally.

3/4 is where you count 1 2 3, 1 2 3, but 6/8 you count 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and 5 and 6 and 1.

i-N-V I don't know what that N means.
#9
Quote by Xiaoxi
Not exactly...
Could you explain why not?
Because my answer is I think right because Steve Vai wrote a chord progression in B major and it went like F# E E F# B sus2 A.
#10
how does a bIIMAJ7 chord function?
What tensions are available on a Maj7 chord, extended to the 13?
what altered tensions are available when using a superlocrian chord/scale.
what is the purpose of melodic and harmonic minor, and how did they first arise
what is an example of an extended work that alternates between modality and functional harmony
what is plurality of function--and what is every function of a Fm7 chord, how do the notes B F# and E function against any (and all) bass notes.
what is chromatic wandering to diatonic release?
what is a piece from the common practice period (classical repetoire) that makes use of chromatic wandering to diatonic release.
what chords do you use if you want to retain modality in all 7 modes of the major scale?
what are bebop scales.
what is the difference between functional and non-functional harmony?
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#11
Quote by GuitarMunky
Name the Primary chords in C major and describe the function of each.

C Major D minor E minor F major G major A minor B diminished.
I don't know what you mean by functions.
#12
Quote by liampje
I think that's a canon.

I will try to write it but not now maybe tommorow.

B# C# D# E# F# G# A#
I don't know how to write them digitally.

3/4 is where you count 1 2 3, 1 2 3, but 6/8 you count 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and 5 and 6 and 1.

i-N-V I don't know what that N means.


3/4 is 1 2 3 yes but 6/8 is 1 2
#13
Quote by tehREALcaptain
how does a bIIMAJ7 chord function?
What tensions are available on a Maj7 chord, extended to the 13?
what altered tensions are available when using a superlocrian chord/scale.
what is the purpose of melodic and harmonic minor, and how did they first arise
what is an example of an extended work that alternates between modality and functional harmony
what is plurality of function--and what is every function of a Fm7 chord, how do the notes B F# and E function against any (and all) bass notes.
what is chromatic wandering to diatonic release?
what is a piece from the common practice period (classical repetoire) that makes use of chromatic wandering to diatonic release.
what chords do you use if you want to retain modality in all 7 modes of the major scale?
what are bebop scales.
what is the difference between functional and non-functional harmony?

1) That's a minor chord with a major seventh, but I'm kind of confused because in neither Major Minor Melodic and harmonic minor the second degree is major.
2)What scale are we talking about and what degree.
3)Melodic and harmonic minor are just different minor scales, and knowing how they first arose is history.
4)I don't know any examples, but I can explain them.
Modality is picking a key and picking a scale degree and making that your tonal center, Functional harmony is a key and the root is always the most important note.
5)No Idea.
6)Playing chromatic lines and eventually they resolve into a scale of some sort, commonly seen in jazz music.
7)Probably some jazz piece.
8)Chords that have a drone, I have an example of that kind in my sig.
And little chord progressions.
9)I have no idea.
10) I don't know for sure but non functional harmony doesn't really do anything with the piece and functional harmony actually does.
#14
Isn't the B# one a trick question ? Because B# = C so the notes would be those of the C major scale and not whatever the **** you wrote there.
#15
Quote by liampje
I think that's a canon.

I will try to write it but not now maybe tommorow.

B# C# D# E# F# G# A#
I don't know how to write them digitally.

3/4 is where you count 1 2 3, 1 2 3, but 6/8 you count 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and 5 and 6 and 1.

i-N-V I don't know what that N means.


N is a neopolitan chord, and it isn't a canon. (canon is pretty 'common' in classical music, I'm talking something you'll most likely only encounter in avant-garde music). The first question is hard, though.
#16
Quote by Sóknardalr
3/4 is 1 2 3 yes but 6/8 is 1 2
Could you explain that 1 2 better?
Or do you mean you count 1 2 1 2 1 2 etc.
#17
Quote by Kroaton
Isn't the B# one a trick question ? Because B# = C so the notes would be those of the C major scale and not whatever the **** you wrote there.

I knew that but I also know that sometimes music isn't what you expect it to be.
Such as F# and Gb are the same notes but Gb wants to go down to F and F# wants to go up to G.
#18
Quote by Kroaton
Isn't the B# one a trick question ? Because B# = C so the notes would be those of the C major scale and not whatever the **** you wrote there.


He did it right.

3/4 - XxXxXx
6/8 - XxxXxx

Capital X's are accents, lowercase are not accented (or, rather, the way you feel the pulse).
#19
So far only Guitar Munky's question was appropriate to the TS's current knowledge, based off, as Gavk pointed out, insane amount of threads
#20
Quote by Keth
He did it right.

3/4 - XxXxXx
6/8 - XxxXxx

Capital X's are accents, lowercase are not accented (or, rather, the way you feel the pulse).

I don't get that can you write down the actual counting for one bar and the accents on caps lock?
How am I doing so far btw?
#21
Give me three time signatures that classify as simple meter, compound meter and odd meter (3 for each).
#22
Quote by liampje
Could you explain why not?
Because my answer is I think right because Steve Vai wrote a chord progression in B major and it went like F# E E F# B sus2 A.

Neapolitan (N) is essentially a major triad with its root on the b2 degree of either the major or minor scale. So in C major or minor, it is Db F Ab.

However, it is most often voiced on its 3rd, F. Notice that F is the subdominant root of C major. So it is mostly used as a subdominant functioning chord with an altered chromatic note (the Db). In this context as a subdominant harmony, logically it leads to a dominant harmony such as V7. As with all functional harmony, this can be relative; N of not only I, but also ii, iii, IV, V, and vi in the major key and their corresponding positions in minor.

The Steve Vai progression you mentioned doesn't make any use of neapolitan (which in B major would be some form of C major chord).

Typical 4 part voice leading:
N6: F Ab Db F
V7: G G  B  F 
I:  C G  C  E


Notice the chromaticism of Db -> B -> C.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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Last edited by Xiaoxi at Apr 27, 2011,
#24
Let me get you in real time, and I'll show you what you don't know. Anyone can Google and Wikipedia their answers. That's not knowledge. I want to see what you know in real time, and...you can test me. Parroting Wiki and Google results is not the equivalent of knowing what you are talking about.

Try me, just PM me your IM on Yahoo, and I'll be happy to "test" you. Otherwise this is a game designed to make you feel better about what you know, and who knows maybe you've already PM'd me to link this topic to "prove" it. I haven't checked.

Google this if you have to, and you'll prove my point. What are the correct notes in the Gb Minor Triad?

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Apr 27, 2011,
#25
Quote by Keth
He did it right.

3/4 - XxXxXx
6/8 - XxxXxx

Capital X's are accents, lowercase are not accented (or, rather, the way you feel the pulse).


Think of it is way, 3/4 is a simple meter, which means you count it the same as 4/4 or anything like that, with 1 less pulse.

3/4 - 1 and 2 and 3 and (The accented pulse is on the numbers)

6/8 is a compound meter, which means it has a completely different feel than 3/4 and any other simple meter.

6/8 - 1 la li 2 la li (Accented pulses are still on the numbers)

EDIT: Also notice in the simple meter (3/4) the pulses are divided into two beats (1 and) but in compound meter (6/8) the pulses are divided into 3 (1 la li)
"When that day comes I shall Futterwacken ... vigorously."
~ The Mad Hatter



Last edited by nbur4556 at Apr 27, 2011,
#26
You guys think it would be interesting to have an official "testing" thread and see what we know/don't know?

...modes and scales are still useless.


Quote by PhoenixGRM
Hey guys could you spare a minute to Vote for my band. Go to the site Search our band Listana with CTRL+F for quick and vote Thank you .
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Voted for Patron Çıldırdı.

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Quote by PhoenixGRM
But our Band is Listana
#27
Quote by Xiaoxi
You guys think it would be interesting to have an official "testing" thread and see what we know/don't know?

Would be good.
#28
Quote by Sean0913
Let me get you in real time, and I'll show you what you don't know. Anyone can Google and Wikipedia their answers. That's not knowledge. I want to see what you know in real time, and...you can test me. Parroting Wiki and Google results is not the equivalent of knowing what you are talking about.

Try me, just PM me your IM on Yahoo, and I'll be happy to "test" you. Otherwise this is a game designed to make you feel better about what you know, and who knows maybe you've already PM'd me to link this topic to "prove" it. I haven't checked.

Google this if you have to, and you'll prove my point. What are the correct notes in the Gb Minor Triad?

Sean

What's yahoo IM?
#29
Quote by liampje
What's yahoo IM?


Yahoo Instant Messenger. Pretty much Yahoo's version of MSN.
#30
Quote by Xiaoxi
Neapolitan (N) is essentially a major triad with its root on the b2 degree of either the major or minor scale. So in C major or minor, it is Db F Ab.


German music theory books handle the neopolitan chord as a minor iv with a minor 6th replacing the chord's 5th degree which means it also usually appears just as that instead of in inversion. Same notes in the end but it's based off of a different degree. Just a fun fact, I suppose.
#31
I have a song in the key of C major. I play the E phrygian scale over it. What mode am I playing?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#32
Quote by AlanHB
I have a song in the key of C major. I play the E phrygian scale over it. What mode am I playing?


Super Locrian b3b7
#33
Quote by liampje
I think that's a canon.

I will try to write it but not now maybe tommorow.

B# C# D# E# F# G# A#
I don't know how to write them digitally.


It's actually:

B sharp, C double sharp, D double sharp, E sharp, F double sharp, G double sharp, A double sharp.

T
#35
1) That's a minor chord with a major seventh, but I'm kind of confused because in neither Major Minor Melodic and harmonic minor the second degree is major.

diatonic chords are not the only chords usable in a key. and its uppercase bII major seven (so in C it would be Dbmaj7). if you want to figure out the function, I'd compare it to a iim7 chord (does it share notes?) and check out the tunes All the Things You Are, Lady Bird and Someday My Prince Will come (and probably many more). see what chord it usually leads to, and how it sounds.

2)What scale are we talking about and what degree.
the superlocrian scale. the seventh mode of the melodic minor scale.

3)Melodic and harmonic minor are just different minor scales, and knowing how they first arose is history.

Theres a very specific reason, which won't transform your playing, but I think is important to know (and is a very early example of singers demanding instrumentalists cater to their deficiencies). theres a reason (involving one very important chord) that these scales are used in minor keys in lieu of natural minor.


4)I don't know any examples, but I can explain them.
Modality is picking a key and picking a scale degree and making that your tonal center, Functional harmony is a key and the root is always the most important note.

sure. with functional harmony the root is not always the most important note (totally opinion--but I'd argue the 4 and 7 are the most important notes), but it is the point of return. theres also a very specific way of using chords and progressions (google it maybe?).

5)No Idea.
Do you know what the words plurality and function mean? It is literally exactly what it sounds like--finding the possible functions of chords/notes. for F minor, you'd want to consider what keys it occurs in. For the group of notes (B E F#), you'd consider them in relation to all 12 possible bass notes (so the major seventh, third and #11 in C, the root, perfect 4th and Fifth in B, the b9, #11 and b13 or #5--depending on context--in Bb, etc).

6)Playing chromatic lines and eventually they resolve into a scale of some sort, commonly seen in jazz music.
kind of yeah, mostly no. it is moving voices (when using chords) chromatically, so that your harmonies are dictated by what you want, what sounds good and close voiceleading, rather then functional harmony. It is seen in jazz music, but not at all commonly, and it came about at the end of the romantic period.

7)Probably some jazz piece.
Yeah, but thats not common practice period. It's used in a good deal of late romantic music, the most prevelent example is this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ef-4Bv5Ng0w
theres some antonio carlos jobim tune based on that harmony though (so your right)--also, radiohead's exit music for a film.
8)Chords that have a drone, I have an example of that kind in my sig.
And little chord progressions.
you'd want to use triads that are not diminished, and are the tonic triad or contain the charecteristic note of the mode (called "Dominant Equivilants", by Vincent Persechetti).
9)I have no idea.
Plenty of post-common practice period classical music does. Debussy alternates between modal and functional stuff in his Suite Bergamesque (and a lot of his other stuff), and (I believe, i don't have the score) Orff does in Carmina Burana, but I could be wrong about that.
10) I don't know for sure but non functional harmony doesn't really do anything with the piece and functional harmony actually does.
non-functional harmony does A LOT with the piece, it just doesn't use harmonic function as the guiding principle. examples are the IV chord in a blues, anything modal, whole tone passages, many of the chords in the chopin piece linked above, and a lot of impressionistic music, and post-bop jazz. functional harmony is harmony predicated on the resolution of a V chord to a I chord, and the use of "normal progressions" to get there. its something worth figuring out. Allen Mchose did a lot of research and has a good method for getting inside functional harmony (as does Ottman, or Kosta).
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#36
Quote by liampje
C Major D minor E minor F major G major A minor B diminished.
I don't know what you mean by functions.


^ those are all the chords the key of C, but what about the "primary" chords?

btw, the terms "chord function" and "primary" chords are very lookupable.

This is fundamental stuff. No offense intended, but If you don't get this you really have no business studying Neapolitan chords, or modes and things of that nature.

It's like trying to learn algebra when you're struggling to understand how 1 + 1 = 2.

If you build your house with no foundation it's sure to come crashing down.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 27, 2011,
#38
Quote by AlanHB
I have a song in the key of C major. I play the E phrygian scale over it. What mode am I playing?


I think this made the thread, and my day.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#39
Quote by nmitchell076
What hexachords have 3 minor third relationships among their pitch classes?

6-1, 2, Z36, Z3, Z40, Z11, 15, Z46, Z24, Z47, Z25, Z44, Z19, Z10, Z39, 14, 31, 20, 8, 33, 32

...modes and scales are still useless.


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Voted for Patron Çıldırdı.

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Quote by PhoenixGRM
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#40
Cool it down guys, as Munky and Sean have pointed out, the guy doesn't even know what primary chords are or how chords function, how is he going to know about hexachords and chromatic/altered harmony.
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