#1
Will my 2010 Stratocaster be considered vintage in 2065? Or are only the early (first) models considered vintage? Basically is it age or Year?
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Last edited by Rich EpiWildkat at Apr 27, 2011,
#2
Depends on how many survive. They are mass-produced by the thousands. Just because something is old doesn't necessarily make it desirable.

Not every guitar from the 1950's costs thousands today. Their prices may have gone up slightly because they're rare, but they're more of a curious object from another time than a truly desirable instrument. The reason that old Fenders, Gibsons and Martins cost so much is because they're really good guitars, originally produced in much smaller numbers, and not all of them have survived to this day.
Last edited by sashki at Apr 27, 2011,
#5
So if all the other 2010 Strats go die i'll be in on a winner? :p I guess its already Vintage as 2010 Strats are not made any more :p
'Slap bass refers to the slap delivered to the bassist when they play too loud or with any kind of attention drawing behaviour...'

'The dusty end, is not my friend.'
#6
1) Buy a guitar worth +- 200 euro.
2) Bang it up, make it a relic. Make sure it still functions and plays well though.
3) Keep it for 55 years.
4) ???
5) Profit regardless of outcome !
#7
Why buy a 2010 when a Fender from the 90's has a twenty year head start?!

Srsly tho; not that many older guitars, except ones pre-80's have accumulated any collector value.
#9
Quote by sashki
Depends on how many survive. They are mass-produced by the thousands. Just because something is old doesn't necessarily make it desirable.

Not every guitar from the 1950's costs thousands today. Their prices may have gone up slightly because they're rare, but they're more of a curious object from another time than a truly desirable instrument. The reason that old Fenders, Gibsons and Martins cost so much is because they're really good guitars, originally produced in much smaller numbers, and not all of them have survived to this day.



This was a perfect answer, why are people still replying?
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#10
Quote by JustRooster
This was a perfect answer, why are people still replying?



maybe the same reason you are
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#11
Quote by sashki
Depends on how many survive. They are mass-produced by the thousands. Just because something is old doesn't necessarily make it desirable.

Not every guitar from the 1950's costs thousands today. Their prices may have gone up slightly because they're rare, but they're more of a curious object from another time than a truly desirable instrument. The reason that old Fenders, Gibsons and Martins cost so much is because they're really good guitars, originally produced in much smaller numbers, and not all of them have survived to this day.


It's also worth mentioning that we can't predict things that may happen in the future - For example, pre-1964 Fenders wouldn't be nearly as valuable today if CBS hadn't bought the company. If Fender is bought out by a Chinese manufacturer in 2013, mass layoffs, and the quality drops with CBS-esque corner-cutting and new employees getting a trial-by-fire, then the value will definitely go up. But you can't predict the future, which is a big element.

Though you're doing it wrong if you buy your guitar based on how much it'll be worth in fifty years.
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