#1
My main genre is heavy metal. But i like to play all kind of music soft and rock n metal. I started playing electric guitar for almost a year. before that i used to play acoustic guitar. even i practiced metal with may acoustic guitar. but now i cant play acoustic any more. because my acoustic sound is very low and not smooth and fast. But i can play electric guitar fairly fast. Is this normal or it's just me. one of my band member can play electric and acoustic both very well. Do any of you facing the same problem? do you practice electric and acoustic both or just with electric?
#2
You can't play acoustic and electric the same way. If you think that the acoustic is too quiet get an electric-acoustic guitar amp connect it to an amp. Besides I think that playing acoustic is more about the chords and playing electric is playing fast and loud
#3
They are very different instruments and should be treated as such - something good sounding on electric may not work on acoustic and vica-versa
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

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#5
i have watched interviews with mikael akerfeldt and he says that he writes all of his riffs on acoustic, thinking that if it sounds metal on acoustic then it will sound really heavy and dark on electric, I don't think the same can be said in reverse. I agree with HP92 in the regard that electric you can play faster, however many people can play very fast and get a great sound out of an acoustic. I just think it comes down to your playing style. It is harder to transition from an electric to an acoustic, mostly due to neck size, string gauge and action of the acoustic. My advice, practice, practice, practice!
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#6
Quote by bobafettacheese
i have watched interviews with mikael akerfeldt and he says that he writes all of his riffs on acoustic, thinking that if it sounds metal on acoustic then it will sound really heavy and dark on electric, I don't think the same can be said in reverse. I agree with HP92 in the regard that electric you can play faster, however many people can play very fast and get a great sound out of an acoustic. I just think it comes down to your playing style. It is harder to transition from an electric to an acoustic, mostly due to neck size, string gauge and action of the acoustic. My advice, practice, practice, practice!

Well of course there's dudes like Al Di Meola who can play really fast on acoustic but that takes years of practice
#7
that is exactly who I was thinking of as well.
Gibson LP traditional and DC standard, PRS S2 Custom 24, Schecter Banshee 7
EVH 5153, Mesa DR Tremoverb combo 2-2x12's
Line 6 M13
#8
Acoustics are more about chording/strum pattern. It really is a whole 'nother beast. Playing and singing on electric is great because it hides some of your sloppiness - acoustic is not so forgiving.
#9
acoustic i obviously about rhythm mostly and you need far more finger strength. generally acoustics have higher actions, differet necks, and way thicker strings (if you want tone and volume...thin strings generally sound thin and quiet).

and any form of lead play on acoustic is generally pretty different. technically, you can do anything on an acoustic that you can do on an electric (besides tremolo and stuff) but its just doesnt go with alot of stuff really.

bascially, you gotta change your game up a bit. plus there are a ton of sick songs that are acoustic. for me, its about training myself in all styles of music, being able to play in all settings, have a portable guitar (no amp needed), and increasing my finger strength (11s or 12s with a higher action makes my hand REAL tired sometimes. definitely great to increase finger strength)
#10
I started out playing electric about 6~ish years ago. I know, like anybody else, that playing acoustic and electric guitar differs a lot. It's basically two different schools of playing. Anyway, at one point I felt I was lacking something, so I switched over to the acoustic for a while, and it was a like another dimension of playing. It was a lot harder to produce the sound I was going for, hardly any room for error and all of that.

Playing acoustic (especially finger-picking songs) is a great way to get better at rhythm, understanding and conveying the feel of a song... which you can later on apply to any type of guitar.

I play both daily, but I would have to admit, knowing how to play real nice acoustic songs is a lot more rewarding than electric guitar ones. Not in a sense that one is better than the other, but it's a different feeling... and it's just hard to explain.

There are lots of great acoustic songs to play. Have a look at stuff by David Crosby - his first solo album "If I Could Only Remember My Name..." (or any CSNY song for that matter). You should also look up bluesy stuff. They're usually somewhat fast songs, and lots of finger picking. Another great finger picking song (but not for the novice player) is Jefferson Airplane "Embryonic Journey".


I would advise you to play both as much as you can. You'll only get better by it!
Last edited by icep at Apr 28, 2011,
#11
Quote by CantShred
Acoustics are more about chording/strum pattern. It really is a whole 'nother beast. Playing and singing on electric is great because it hides some of your sloppiness - acoustic is not so forgiving.

not sure what you mean, sure there are strumming and singing songs but there's a lot more too. here's a good pair of self proclaimed metal heads that do both.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8zT_OxsDFs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cUibjcu2L_s

and zepplin.

i tend to find that the better the gear, the less "forgiving" it is, acoustic or electric. amps that lack clarity are the ones i think hide mistakes, but with that they hide the parts you got right as well.


*** for best results learn and practice every kind of guitar and genre possible...
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#12
R&G are badass. I wish I was 1/10 the guitarist Gabriella is.

I don't know anyone who tries to be an acoustic guitar hero like that though - my post completely left that group of people/musicians out.

Also - the strum thing I meant because the muted strings and clicks between notes come through so much better acoustically that they really can make or break a song, whereas on electric I feel that they tend not to be very important in a song. And I say chording because you have to carry the melody and bass notes.

I feel like acoustically you're carrying a lot more. You can't just play a power chord and have a ball-crushing tone monster amp backing you up.


Hope that made some form of sense.
Last edited by CantShred at Apr 28, 2011,
#13
I can't play acoustic

Of course you can. Get an acoustic amp or experiment with different techniques until you get it right. And try to remember that while it's the fundementally the same instrument with the same sound, they are being played in two different ways, even though it's possible to play them with "each other's technique"
#14
One man.

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"Experience is not what happens to you. It is what you do with what happens to you." - Aldous Huxley