#1
Okay, so one day my friend was talking to me about music theory(what little we know about it) and he told me just to create my own scale. Well i looked up on the internet how, of course i came up with nothing, but just yesterday, i stumbled upon the most revolutionary idea(at least of music) to cross my mind. It was influenced by what my friend told me, "a scale that doesn't stay the same every octave" and well, i found something that works. It works well, and it doesn't sound weird at all!

There are almost 7 billion people on the planet so i am more than positive this has been proposed and named and processed. I came up with a scale containing only 4 intervals that repeat. And as it turns out. It will take approximately(cuz i'm not entirely sure) 13 repeats before you get the same note progression as the very first.

The scale goes like this: Whole-Whole-Whole-Half-etc.

So what ends up happening is the note progression is different between every octave, and in fact, after the first repeat, it doesn't hit an octave note until about the 7th repeat. So if i start on the lowest E note on my guitar, then i won't hit an E until i get to the highest E on the fretboard(with E standard tuning of course)!

You have a specific shape that repeats, but it doesn't last a whole octave, and it's not exactly half an octave either.

The best part about this scale is that EVERY SINGLE note has a Perfect 5th Harmony! So you can bet your ass that this scale can do very well with heavy metal. The tricky part of this scale is learning it. It seems easy enough to remember, wwwhwwwh etc., but trying to understand how it works and how far it can go, or even just shifting it around is so confusing. I'm determined to figure this out, and that's one reason why i'm starting this thread.

I want to hear more about this. It's an unconventional take at music(speaking for western music) so i'd like to see how far this can go. PLEASE people share your experiences with this scale or any that YOU'VE made similar to this. I'm very excited about my discovery, and now i want this to be on the internet, so that i don't have to search this topic and go through a million forums before i find it.

I'd also like to add, that if you know common scales used for "cowboy western" music, you know, like in the Spaghetti Western Movies and whatnot, please let me know. All i can think of is the Major Pentatonic scale and the Major Scale. Perhaps a little bit of the Harmonic Minor, since it's used in some Spanish music(i think, i don't actually listen to spanish music).

I worship you if you sat on your ass and read the entire post. I hardly ever read entire posts if they're longer than a paragraph. BTW, i am currently trying to compose some music with this scale.
#2
Some non-western music does use a scale that goes beyond an octave. A scale like the one you propose would not have one specific tonal centre. The reason an Octave is special is because it's a frequency doubled and thus sounds almost the same to our ears.
#3
I'd say before getting our oppinions you should compose that song first, because you got alot of research to do for each instrument since you will have different notes available due to the range of each instrument, otherwise it's just chromatic....
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#4
To embody what the other people are saying:

Yes, you can play any note randomly on the fretboard and call it whatever you want. However when it comes to application to music, its usefulness may be limited.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
Quote by Shredder J
Okay, so one day my friend was talking to me about music theory(what little we know about it) and he told me just to create my own scale. Well i looked up on the internet how, of course i came up with nothing, but just yesterday, i stumbled upon the most revolutionary idea(at least of music) to cross my mind. It was influenced by what my friend told me, "a scale that doesn't stay the same every octave" and well, i found something that works. It works well, and it doesn't sound weird at all!

There are almost 7 billion people on the planet so i am more than positive this has been proposed and named and processed. I came up with a scale containing only 4 intervals that repeat. And as it turns out. It will take approximately(cuz i'm not entirely sure) 13 repeats before you get the same note progression as the very first.

The scale goes like this: Whole-Whole-Whole-Half-etc.

So what ends up happening is the note progression is different between every octave, and in fact, after the first repeat, it doesn't hit an octave note until about the 7th repeat. So if i start on the lowest E note on my guitar, then i won't hit an E until i get to the highest E on the fretboard(with E standard tuning of course)!

You have a specific shape that repeats, but it doesn't last a whole octave, and it's not exactly half an octave either.

The best part about this scale is that EVERY SINGLE note has a Perfect 5th Harmony! So you can bet your ass that this scale can do very well with heavy metal. The tricky part of this scale is learning it. It seems easy enough to remember, wwwhwwwh etc., but trying to understand how it works and how far it can go, or even just shifting it around is so confusing. I'm determined to figure this out, and that's one reason why i'm starting this thread.

I want to hear more about this. It's an unconventional take at music(speaking for western music) so i'd like to see how far this can go. PLEASE people share your experiences with this scale or any that YOU'VE made similar to this. I'm very excited about my discovery, and now i want this to be on the internet, so that i don't have to search this topic and go through a million forums before i find it.

I'd also like to add, that if you know common scales used for "cowboy western" music, you know, like in the Spaghetti Western Movies and whatnot, please let me know. All i can think of is the Major Pentatonic scale and the Major Scale. Perhaps a little bit of the Harmonic Minor, since it's used in some Spanish music(i think, i don't actually listen to spanish music).

I worship you if you sat on your ass and read the entire post. I hardly ever read entire posts if they're longer than a paragraph. BTW, i am currently trying to compose some music with this scale.


E w F#w G#w A#h B w C#w D#w E# h F#

C D E F# G A B C# D

Like that?
#6
I like that you're thinking outside the box and trying new ideas of your own. I respect that, but it always has to come back to the music - an idea for the sake of novelty and curiosity is interesting but only useful it it leads to good music. These things can be taken too far look at anything by John Cage as an example.
Si
#7
Quote by 20Tigers
I like that you're thinking outside the box and trying new ideas of your own. I respect that, but it always has to come back to the music - an idea for the sake of novelty and curiosity is interesting but only useful it it leads to good music. These things can be taken too far look at anything by John Cage as an example.

maybe a bit harsh
#9
This (or something similar) is a pretty common thing with more classical music of the last 100 years or so. It's not really a scale so much as pitch material, and what you've done interests me (I've experimented with very similar things) as it creates a sort of register-specific pitch material. Instead of a tone row or a pitch class set that are like scales in that they are rendered as pitch classes, this denotes specific pitches in specific octaves to fall within the pitch material and different melodic cells dependent on the register.

Of course, if you're not into that type of music, the uses for this is probably somewhat limited.
#11
Quote by AlanHB
To embody what the other people are saying:

Yes, you can play any note randomly on the fretboard and call it whatever you want. However when it comes to application to music, its usefulness may be limited.


Limited, yes, but if it provides the basis for just one song it was worth doing.
#12
Quote by Sean0913
E w F#w G#w A#h B w C#w D#w E# h F#

C D E F# G A B C# D

Like that?


yeah, like that. i was talking over this with my friend and he just called it a pattern, so i really don't know what to call it now. BUT i am certain that it sounds pretty good, and since it takes 13 repeats of the pattern to get back to the starting notes, it's kind of difficult to learn, at least for me. but i'm gonna keep looking at this. I hope more people come and discuss this topic, i want to learn a little more about this. I'm sure this isn't the first time anyone came up with the sequence WWWH. After all, its in the major scale, you know, wwh...WWWH. Perhaps that's why it has great harmonies, it's practically ripped right out of the major scale. i didn't notice that at first. hmm...

In the meantime, i'm gonna work on this song. so far it's just chords, i don't know if i'm gonna go heavy metal with it cuz it sounds kind of relaxing so far. Almost ambient or like white noise(just needs a few effects). I still need to construct it also, i have bits and pieces but no order of them.

Thank you everyone who's discussing this. Just a couple weeks ago, one of my friend's friends told me that i have no soul(i play like a robot). So i decided to change that, and really start trying my own thing. I'm gonna see where it goes and hopefully i can make some original sounding material with this.
#13
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
This (or something similar) is a pretty common thing with more classical music of the last 100 years or so. It's not really a scale so much as pitch material, and what you've done interests me (I've experimented with very similar things) as it creates a sort of register-specific pitch material. Instead of a tone row or a pitch class set that are like scales in that they are rendered as pitch classes, this denotes specific pitches in specific octaves to fall within the pitch material and different melodic cells dependent on the register.

Of course, if you're not into that type of music, the uses for this is probably somewhat limited.

This idea interests me.

It would be as if, depending on the octave played in, your key would "change" (I use the word "key" loosely). Some very interesting polytonal stuff could be done with this.
#14
Yeah, I've written a piece using something like this with the sequence 314151413 (m3 m2 M3 m2 P4 m2 M3 m2 m3). I started at the lowest note (of a marimba) and just sequenced upwards for 4.3 octaves and the results were very cool, but I did not take full advantage of how this works as I just stumbled upon it for this piece. But it is interesting to see different melodic characteristic depending on the octave.
#15
What i see here is, the end of the major scale as you have noticed.

When you repeat however, instead of WWH ( I iim iiim ) your skipping the H by a semitone
(WWW) which then skips the octave of the major scale.

ex. A-W-B-W-C#-W-D#-H-E-W-F#-W-G# : here Would be a H for the A again and major scale repeating. (Key of E, starting on the IV). Instead your pattern skips the A octave and plays,

A# which would then insinuate a key change to F from E, BUT.. Then your pattern "makes up for the key change" caused, by throwing in a H again, so.. B.. then W C# and onward, up through all the keys.
#16
worship me, i read the entire post....


Anyway thats pretty sweet bro glad to see your coming up with some stuff!
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#17
Quote by ToXyN
What i see here is, the end of the major scale as you have noticed.

When you repeat however, instead of WWH ( I iim iiim ) your skipping the H by a semitone
(WWW) which then skips the octave of the major scale.

ex. A-W-B-W-C#-W-D#-H-E-W-F#-W-G# : here Would be a H for the A again and major scale repeating. (Key of E, starting on the IV). Instead your pattern skips the A octave and plays,

A# which would then insinuate a key change to F from E, BUT.. Then your pattern "makes up for the key change" caused, by throwing in a H again, so.. B.. then W C# and onward, up through all the keys.


thanks for the explanation. i see it now. at first i didn't notice it was from the major scale. That explains the harmonies. And i didn't realize that it goes through all the keys. It's amazing, i've created some contrasting riffs with it. One sounds kind of heavy, and the other relaxing. But it's for anyone to judge. I think i'm gonna have a lot of fun with it. Oh and also, i've been using the pattern H-W-W-W starting at D open(cuz i'm tuned to D standard). This way i can actually play open chords. It's much easier on my hands, but still the shapes are difficult, but they sound so awesome. I have also been thinking about trying this pattern H-W-H-W# or augmented i think that's what its called. It's part of the Harmonic Minor scale. It really doesn't sound too amazing, kind of more Eastern than Harmonic Minor itself. I don't know if i'll continue on trying more with 4 interval patterns. For me the only good one is W-W-W-H. Maybe if I use 5, i'll try somethin like H-W-W-H-W. I can't wait to share this with my friends. I don't know what use they'd have from these patterns, but I like them, they're different from what I always hear and play.
#18
Quote by GoodOl'trashbag
worship me, i read the entire post....


Anyway thats pretty sweet bro glad to see your coming up with some stuff!


I do! hah! I'm glad people are talking about this. At least now I know where this pattern came from and a little more how it works from the guy who posted right before you. If there's one thing i've always tried to do, is be different. And so my friend's friend was on my ass like, "you have no soul" and all this shit, so I really need to change it up. Maybe this new stuff i've been messing around with will impress him a bit. They guy is 4 years older than me, and I know that he know's what he's talking about. I think making these patterns is helping me start fresh. Cuz it's hard to make something unique from a flat out Major Scale or Minor Scale, or Harmonic minor. Almost anything that can be done has been done on them. They're overused. And I'm not so great with changing keys. I just hope that there will always be something new to look at.
There's a forum somewhere on the web of a non-repeating scale. Just look that term up, and i think it'll be the first webpage that comes up on google. Anyway this guy talks about making a scale that goes through many octaves without repeating, so it's just one big melodic thing. It sounds very interesting. I don't think the guy is talking about on a guitar though.